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E-waste

WEEE Forum expands in three continents

With worldwide e-waste levels continuing to rise by around 3% per annum – and expected to reach in excess of 74 million tonnes (Mt) in 2030 according to UN research – attracting these organisations reflects the desire of the WEEE Forum to spread best practice, engage with actors in all parts of the world and the commitment of the growing global movement to ensuring that e-waste is collected and treated responsibly and in a manner that is not detrimental to people’s health and the environment.

WEEE Producer Responsibility Organisations are emerging across the globe, often ahead of the implementation of legislation in the countries in which they are based, and because of this they are not only helping to shape collection infrastructure in their countries but are also able to influence how e-waste legislation is developed. As a result, they are reaching out to the WEEE Forum to tap into the knowledge and experience of its current members, many of which have huge experience in operating under European legislation that has been in place for almost twenty years.

On announcing these new members, Pascal Leroy, Director General of the WEEE Forum said, “E-waste is increasingly being recognised as a priority waste stream across the world. Innovative organisations are being established that aim to put into practice Extended Producer Responsibility principles and lead the way in formalising e-waste collection, treatment and reporting in their countries. The WEEE Forum offers these organisations access to its network and knowledge base, and in return gains from these emerging PROs’ new approaches and attitudes towards e-waste. We are pleased to be able to welcome new members in Colombia and South Africa on top of recent additions in Nigeria, India, Australia, and Canada, as well as new members in Lithuania and Spain that add to our strong European base.”

The WEEE Forum recently introduced an initiative for “twinning” new producer responsibility organisations with existing, more established, members so each can share knowledge, information and exchange staff, amongst other things. This supports the views of the European Parliament on the Circular Economy Action Plan, which urges producers to take responsibility for products sold into markets outside the EU and to develop consistent approaches worldwide.

Phil Morton, Global Ambassador of the WEEE Forum said, “Our efforts to reach out to stakeholders in the e-waste sector across the world is to ensure e-waste sits high on the global environmental agenda. PROs in countries that are developing producer responsibility regulations can benefit hugely from joining the WEEE Forum and tapping into our experienced network. This work also supports the WEEE Forum’s stated aim of being the world #1 go-to competence centre for WEEE.”

The new members of the WEEE Forum are EcoCómputo and Red Verde from Colombia; ERA, South Africa; EEPA, Lithuania; and Ecolec, Spain. The WEEE Forum now has 43 members, at least one on every continent, and more than it has ever had before. It is looking forward to welcoming more PROs in the near future.

WEEE Forum expands in three continents

With worldwide e-waste levels continuing to rise by around 3% per annum – and expected to reach in excess of 74 million tonnes (Mt) in 2030 according to UN research – attracting these organisations reflects the desire of the WEEE Forum to spread best practice, engage with actors in all parts of the world and the commitment of the growing global movement to ensuring that e-waste is collected and treated responsibly and in a manner that is not detrimental to people’s health and the environment.

WEEE Producer Responsibility Organisations are emerging across the globe, often ahead of the implementation of legislation in the countries in which they are based, and because of this they are not only helping to shape collection infrastructure in their countries but are also able to influence how e-waste legislation is developed. As a result, they are reaching out to the WEEE Forum to tap into the knowledge and experience of its current members, many of which have huge experience in operating under European legislation that has been in place for almost twenty years.

On announcing these new members, Pascal Leroy, Director General of the WEEE Forum said, “E-waste is increasingly being recognised as a priority waste stream across the world. Innovative organisations are being established that aim to put into practice Extended Producer Responsibility principles and lead the way in formalising e-waste collection, treatment and reporting in their countries. The WEEE Forum offers these organisations access to its network and knowledge base, and in return gains from these emerging PROs’ new approaches and attitudes towards e-waste. We are pleased to be able to welcome new members in Colombia and South Africa on top of recent additions in Nigeria, India, Australia, and Canada, as well as new members in Lithuania and Spain that add to our strong European base.”

The WEEE Forum recently introduced an initiative for “twinning” new producer responsibility organisations with existing, more established, members so each can share knowledge, information and exchange staff, amongst other things. This supports the views of the European Parliament on the Circular Economy Action Plan, which urges producers to take responsibility for products sold into markets outside the EU and to develop consistent approaches worldwide.

Phil Morton, Global Ambassador of the WEEE Forum said, “Our efforts to reach out to stakeholders in the e-waste sector across the world is to ensure e-waste sits high on the global environmental agenda. PROs in countries that are developing producer responsibility regulations can benefit hugely from joining the WEEE Forum and tapping into our experienced network. This work also supports the WEEE Forum’s stated aim of being the world #1 go-to competence centre for WEEE.”

The new members of the WEEE Forum are EcoCómputo and Red Verde from Colombia; ERA, South Africa; EEPA, Lithuania; and Ecolec, Spain. The WEEE Forum now has 43 members, at least one on every continent, and more than it has ever had before. It is looking forward to welcoming more PROs in the near future.

WEEE Forum expands in three continents

With worldwide e-waste levels continuing to rise by around 3% per annum – and expected to reach in excess of 74 million tonnes (Mt) in 2030 according to UN research – attracting these organisations reflects the desire of the WEEE Forum to spread best practice, engage with actors in all parts of the world and the commitment of the growing global movement to ensuring that e-waste is collected and treated responsibly and in a manner that is not detrimental to people’s health and the environment.

WEEE Producer Responsibility Organisations are emerging across the globe, often ahead of the implementation of legislation in the countries in which they are based, and because of this they are not only helping to shape collection infrastructure in their countries but are also able to influence how e-waste legislation is developed. As a result, they are reaching out to the WEEE Forum to tap into the knowledge and experience of its current members, many of which have huge experience in operating under European legislation that has been in place for almost twenty years.

On announcing these new members, Pascal Leroy, Director General of the WEEE Forum said, “E-waste is increasingly being recognised as a priority waste stream across the world. Innovative organisations are being established that aim to put into practice Extended Producer Responsibility principles and lead the way in formalising e-waste collection, treatment and reporting in their countries. The WEEE Forum offers these organisations access to its network and knowledge base, and in return gains from these emerging PROs’ new approaches and attitudes towards e-waste. We are pleased to be able to welcome new members in Colombia and South Africa on top of recent additions in Nigeria, India, Australia, and Canada, as well as new members in Lithuania and Spain that add to our strong European base.”

The WEEE Forum recently introduced an initiative for “twinning” new producer responsibility organisations with existing, more established, members so each can share knowledge, information and exchange staff, amongst other things. This supports the views of the European Parliament on the Circular Economy Action Plan, which urges producers to take responsibility for products sold into markets outside the EU and to develop consistent approaches worldwide.

Phil Morton, Global Ambassador of the WEEE Forum said, “Our efforts to reach out to stakeholders in the e-waste sector across the world is to ensure e-waste sits high on the global environmental agenda. PROs in countries that are developing producer responsibility regulations can benefit hugely from joining the WEEE Forum and tapping into our experienced network. This work also supports the WEEE Forum’s stated aim of being the world #1 go-to competence centre for WEEE.”

The new members of the WEEE Forum are EcoCómputo and Red Verde from Colombia; ERA, South Africa; EEPA, Lithuania; and Ecolec, Spain. The WEEE Forum now has 43 members, at least one on every continent, and more than it has ever had before. It is looking forward to welcoming more PROs in the near future.

FEAD event – Batteries’ recycling: energising the EU green transition

The debate, initiated by FEAD President – Peter Kurth, was joined by Hartmut Stahl, Senior Researcher – Oeko Institut, Jose Rizo Martin – Senior Expert at the European Commission, MEP Maria Spyraki – EPP Shadow Rapporteur for ITRE opinion on the new Sustainable Batteries’ Framework, Ralf Mittermayr – CEO, Saubermacher Dienstleistungs AG, Alessandro Danesi – Commerical Director -S.E.VAL Group, Janne Koivisto – Public Affairs Manager – Fortum, and Valerie Plainemaison, FEAD’s Secretary-General.

The discussion was facilitated by moderator Claire Doole, and revolved around the following key issues in relation to the Batteries’ and Waste Batteries’ Regulation:

  • More ambitious collection targets; to achieve the correct handling and disposal of batteries, higher collection targets of up to 80% for all types of batteries are needed, except for automotive batteries for which collection targets of 100% should apply.
  • Mandatory recycled content; the circular economy requires a strong demand for recyclates, and in this regard mandatory recycled content is crucial. FEAD calls that all types of batteries, not only portable batteries, include higher levels of recycled content during the production of new batteries.
  • Need for appropriate and rapid implementation tools; FEAD calls for an early determination of the methodology to be used in the calculation and verification of recycled content, and a performant data gathering for the calculation and verification of recycling efficiencies, and for the recovery of materials.

In conclusion, panellists agreed that having a strong battery value chain is of strategic value and importance for Europe, as well as for the waste management industry. Recycling in a safe manner is an important activity in this value chain, from an economic and resource point of view.

FEAD President Peter Kurth stressed that: “The right framework conditions are needed for a functioning circular economy in the battery sector at European level so that it can develop its full potential. This includes practice-oriented targets for efficiency quotas, ambitious minimum input quotas for recycling raw materials for batteries, and ambitious collection targets coupled with a practical deposit system for batteries. If the framework conditions are right, battery recycling can be a key project for Europe in the transition to a true circular economy.”

FEAD event – Batteries’ recycling: energising the EU green transition

The debate, initiated by FEAD President – Peter Kurth, was joined by Hartmut Stahl, Senior Researcher – Oeko Institut, Jose Rizo Martin – Senior Expert at the European Commission, MEP Maria Spyraki – EPP Shadow Rapporteur for ITRE opinion on the new Sustainable Batteries’ Framework, Ralf Mittermayr – CEO, Saubermacher Dienstleistungs AG, Alessandro Danesi – Commerical Director -S.E.VAL Group, Janne Koivisto – Public Affairs Manager – Fortum, and Valerie Plainemaison, FEAD’s Secretary-General.

The discussion was facilitated by moderator Claire Doole, and revolved around the following key issues in relation to the Batteries’ and Waste Batteries’ Regulation:

  • More ambitious collection targets; to achieve the correct handling and disposal of batteries, higher collection targets of up to 80% for all types of batteries are needed, except for automotive batteries for which collection targets of 100% should apply.
  • Mandatory recycled content; the circular economy requires a strong demand for recyclates, and in this regard mandatory recycled content is crucial. FEAD calls that all types of batteries, not only portable batteries, include higher levels of recycled content during the production of new batteries.
  • Need for appropriate and rapid implementation tools; FEAD calls for an early determination of the methodology to be used in the calculation and verification of recycled content, and a performant data gathering for the calculation and verification of recycling efficiencies, and for the recovery of materials.

In conclusion, panellists agreed that having a strong battery value chain is of strategic value and importance for Europe, as well as for the waste management industry. Recycling in a safe manner is an important activity in this value chain, from an economic and resource point of view.

FEAD President Peter Kurth stressed that: “The right framework conditions are needed for a functioning circular economy in the battery sector at European level so that it can develop its full potential. This includes practice-oriented targets for efficiency quotas, ambitious minimum input quotas for recycling raw materials for batteries, and ambitious collection targets coupled with a practical deposit system for batteries. If the framework conditions are right, battery recycling can be a key project for Europe in the transition to a true circular economy.”

FEAD reiterates support to ambitious EU Regulation

FEAD welcomes the Council’s first remarks, reiterating our support to the proposed Regulation. FEAD underlines the following key points for the waste management sector:

  • FEAD welcomes the Commission’s Regulation to ensure a robust implementation and level playing field across the EU for the waste management sector and the production of batteries.
  • FEAD asks for an extended scope to include the batteries from light means of transport in the same collection targets, in the context of a constantly growing market for these batteries.
  • Pertaining to sustainability and safety requirements, and the determination of the methodology for the calculation of the recycling performance and verification of recycled content, FEAD calls for the required rules to be set in place, and implemented before 2025, to give our sector the needed time to adapt the recovery processes accordingly.
  • FEAD calls for addressing mandatory recycled content in portable batteries, and for more ambitious requirements for mandatory recycled content levels.
  • Concerning the end-of-life management of portable batteries, FEAD advocates for increasing the proposed collection rates of 65% in 2025 and 70% in 2030. The successful return in high proportions of the material flow is a prerequisite for a truly circular economy for which all actors in the value chain must take responsibility. Higher collection targets of 80% for all types of batteries are required, except for automotive batteries for which collection targets of 100% should apply.
  • We also strongly support the introduction of a mandatory return system, to increase the willingness to collect, and encourage the effective and safe management of critical battery flows.

Having a strong battery value chain is of strategic importance for Europe. Recycling in a safe manner is a key activity in this value chain, from both an economic and a resource point of view. Ambitious qualitative and quantitative targets will contribute to realising the circular economy.

FEAD reiterates support to ambitious EU Regulation

FEAD welcomes the Council’s first remarks, reiterating our support to the proposed Regulation. FEAD underlines the following key points for the waste management sector:

  • FEAD welcomes the Commission’s Regulation to ensure a robust implementation and level playing field across the EU for the waste management sector and the production of batteries.
  • FEAD asks for an extended scope to include the batteries from light means of transport in the same collection targets, in the context of a constantly growing market for these batteries.
  • Pertaining to sustainability and safety requirements, and the determination of the methodology for the calculation of the recycling performance and verification of recycled content, FEAD calls for the required rules to be set in place, and implemented before 2025, to give our sector the needed time to adapt the recovery processes accordingly.
  • FEAD calls for addressing mandatory recycled content in portable batteries, and for more ambitious requirements for mandatory recycled content levels.
  • Concerning the end-of-life management of portable batteries, FEAD advocates for increasing the proposed collection rates of 65% in 2025 and 70% in 2030. The successful return in high proportions of the material flow is a prerequisite for a truly circular economy for which all actors in the value chain must take responsibility. Higher collection targets of 80% for all types of batteries are required, except for automotive batteries for which collection targets of 100% should apply.
  • We also strongly support the introduction of a mandatory return system, to increase the willingness to collect, and encourage the effective and safe management of critical battery flows.

Having a strong battery value chain is of strategic importance for Europe. Recycling in a safe manner is a key activity in this value chain, from both an economic and a resource point of view. Ambitious qualitative and quantitative targets will contribute to realising the circular economy.

Electronic Waste – Our greatest threat

he United Nations has already warned that the current 53 million tonnes of e-waste generated every year will more than double by 2050 making it the fastest growing waste stream in the world.

The Founding president of the Global Recycling Foundation, Ranjit Baxi, said: “It may already be too late to stem the tide of the millions of discarded smart phones and other electronic waste from fridges and TVs to microwaves and PC monitors.

“It is not just the items themselves but the irreplaceable precious metals and dangerous components like lithium-ion batteries, cadmium, lead and mercury, flame retardant chemicals and corrosive acid that are used in their manufacture. It amounts to so much toxic waste which if not professionally recycled ends up on waste dumps,” he warned.

According to the Foundation, thousands of containers of plastic and electronic waste are shipped annually around the world to countries which are already incapable of handling the mountains of waste arriving in their ports every year.

Mr Tom Bird, President Bureau of International Recycling, said: “We need to promote recycling of the rapidly growing E Waste volumes to generate valuable Seventh Resource as raw material for the Industry whist helping to meet UNSDG 2030 & Climate change goals. ”

The facts speak for themselves:

Over the past 5 years e-waste has grown to 53 million tonnes and is projected to reach 74 million tonnes by 2030.

We only recycle some 10 million tonnes of e-waste annually, and precious metals valued at over $55 billion are not recovered and are either dumped or burned.

Burning of e-waste produces over 100 million tonnes of CO2 emissions and must be stopped. GRF calls for legislative support and investments to incentivise growth of much needed e-waste Recycling Plants globally.

Electronic Waste – Our greatest threat

he United Nations has already warned that the current 53 million tonnes of e-waste generated every year will more than double by 2050 making it the fastest growing waste stream in the world.

The Founding president of the Global Recycling Foundation, Ranjit Baxi, said: “It may already be too late to stem the tide of the millions of discarded smart phones and other electronic waste from fridges and TVs to microwaves and PC monitors.

“It is not just the items themselves but the irreplaceable precious metals and dangerous components like lithium-ion batteries, cadmium, lead and mercury, flame retardant chemicals and corrosive acid that are used in their manufacture. It amounts to so much toxic waste which if not professionally recycled ends up on waste dumps,” he warned.

According to the Foundation, thousands of containers of plastic and electronic waste are shipped annually around the world to countries which are already incapable of handling the mountains of waste arriving in their ports every year.

Mr Tom Bird, President Bureau of International Recycling, said: “We need to promote recycling of the rapidly growing E Waste volumes to generate valuable Seventh Resource as raw material for the Industry whist helping to meet UNSDG 2030 & Climate change goals. ”

The facts speak for themselves:

Over the past 5 years e-waste has grown to 53 million tonnes and is projected to reach 74 million tonnes by 2030.

We only recycle some 10 million tonnes of e-waste annually, and precious metals valued at over $55 billion are not recovered and are either dumped or burned.

Burning of e-waste produces over 100 million tonnes of CO2 emissions and must be stopped. GRF calls for legislative support and investments to incentivise growth of much needed e-waste Recycling Plants globally.

Electronic Waste – Our greatest threat

he United Nations has already warned that the current 53 million tonnes of e-waste generated every year will more than double by 2050 making it the fastest growing waste stream in the world.

The Founding president of the Global Recycling Foundation, Ranjit Baxi, said: “It may already be too late to stem the tide of the millions of discarded smart phones and other electronic waste from fridges and TVs to microwaves and PC monitors.

“It is not just the items themselves but the irreplaceable precious metals and dangerous components like lithium-ion batteries, cadmium, lead and mercury, flame retardant chemicals and corrosive acid that are used in their manufacture. It amounts to so much toxic waste which if not professionally recycled ends up on waste dumps,” he warned.

According to the Foundation, thousands of containers of plastic and electronic waste are shipped annually around the world to countries which are already incapable of handling the mountains of waste arriving in their ports every year.

Mr Tom Bird, President Bureau of International Recycling, said: “We need to promote recycling of the rapidly growing E Waste volumes to generate valuable Seventh Resource as raw material for the Industry whist helping to meet UNSDG 2030 & Climate change goals. ”

The facts speak for themselves:

Over the past 5 years e-waste has grown to 53 million tonnes and is projected to reach 74 million tonnes by 2030.

We only recycle some 10 million tonnes of e-waste annually, and precious metals valued at over $55 billion are not recovered and are either dumped or burned.

Burning of e-waste produces over 100 million tonnes of CO2 emissions and must be stopped. GRF calls for legislative support and investments to incentivise growth of much needed e-waste Recycling Plants globally.