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Son Güncelleme: 02.08.2021 02:31
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Metal scrap

Crude steel production increases in June

Africa produced 1.5 Mt in June 2021, up 46.9% on June 2020. Asia and Oceania produced 122.5 Mt, up 6.4%. The CIS produced 8.9 Mt, up 9.1%. The EU (27) produced 13.2 Mt, up 34.7%. Europe, Other produced 4.3 Mt, up 21.0% The Middle East produced 3.6 Mt, up 9.1%. North America produced 10.0 Mt, up 45.2%. South America produced 3.9 Mt, up 51.3%.

Top 10 steel-producing countries

China produced 93.9 Mt in June 2021, up 1.5% on June 2020. India produced 9.4 Mt, up 21.4%. Japan produced 8.1 Mt, up 44.4%. The United States produced 7.1 Mt, up 44.4%. Russia is estimated to have produced 6.4 Mt, up 11.4%. South Korea produced 6.0 Mt, up 17.3%. Germany produced 3.4 Mt, up 38.2%. Turkey produced 3.4 Mt, up 17.9%. Brazil produced 3.1 Mt, up 45.2%. Iran is estimated to have produced 2.5 Mt, up 1.9%.

Circular metals and global value chains

After the opening speech of Susie Burrage, President of EuRIC Non-Ferrous Metal Recycling and Trade Branch (EUROMETREC), stressing the enormous contribution of metal recycling to the economy and environmental protection, Hildegard Bentele, Member of the European Parliament, highlighted the key role of metals, in particular critical raw materials, for Europe’s green transition. Dr. Frank Pothen, Head of Fraunhofer IMW branch, Center for Economics of Materials CEM, joined the keynote session to further elaborate on the study made for the BDSV on steel scrap recycling benefits. Linking it with EU’s Green Deal and Circular Economy strategic priorities, Dr. Pothen outlined the CO2 and energy savings stemming from steel scrap use in steelmaking and eluded to the need to reward these benefits in order to level the playing field with extracted raw materials.

Moving to the panel discussion, Maria Nyberg, Policy Officer at Energy Intensive Industries and Raw Materials, DG Grow, European Commission, outlined how the European Commission’s New Industrial Strategy aims at boosting the secondary raw materials markets. Axel Eggert, Director General of EUROFER, highlighted the need to level the playing field and ensure that exports of waste meet equivalent conditions to the ones imposed by European legislation. Tom Bird, President of BIR, made the point that free and fair trade is vital to the recycling industry’s competitiveness, thus a crucial success factor to transitioning towards a more circular economy. Thomas Papageorgiou, President of EuRIC Ferrous Recycling Branch (EFR), talked about the importance of carefully balancing measures which can impact trade as Europe’s supply for most raw materials from recycling exceeds the demand, which is the case for steel scrap. Wrapping up on the previous interventions, Murat BAYRAM, Director and Head of EMR European Non-Ferrous, added that free and fair trade of non-ferrous metal scrap is vital to the recycling industry’s competitiveness and ability to invest in innovation to recover hard to recycle materials.

Olivier Francois, Vice-President of EuRIC, concluded the debate by stressing the inherent global nature of metals in general and the readiness of the recycling industry to provide high quality recycled materials provided there is a market in Europe, which adequately value the environmental and economic benefits it brings to society as a whole.

Circular metals and global value chains

After the opening speech of Susie Burrage, President of EuRIC Non-Ferrous Metal Recycling and Trade Branch (EUROMETREC), stressing the enormous contribution of metal recycling to the economy and environmental protection, Hildegard Bentele, Member of the European Parliament, highlighted the key role of metals, in particular critical raw materials, for Europe’s green transition. Dr. Frank Pothen, Head of Fraunhofer IMW branch, Center for Economics of Materials CEM, joined the keynote session to further elaborate on the study made for the BDSV on steel scrap recycling benefits. Linking it with EU’s Green Deal and Circular Economy strategic priorities, Dr. Pothen outlined the CO2 and energy savings stemming from steel scrap use in steelmaking and eluded to the need to reward these benefits in order to level the playing field with extracted raw materials.

Moving to the panel discussion, Maria Nyberg, Policy Officer at Energy Intensive Industries and Raw Materials, DG Grow, European Commission, outlined how the European Commission’s New Industrial Strategy aims at boosting the secondary raw materials markets. Axel Eggert, Director General of EUROFER, highlighted the need to level the playing field and ensure that exports of waste meet equivalent conditions to the ones imposed by European legislation. Tom Bird, President of BIR, made the point that free and fair trade is vital to the recycling industry’s competitiveness, thus a crucial success factor to transitioning towards a more circular economy. Thomas Papageorgiou, President of EuRIC Ferrous Recycling Branch (EFR), talked about the importance of carefully balancing measures which can impact trade as Europe’s supply for most raw materials from recycling exceeds the demand, which is the case for steel scrap. Wrapping up on the previous interventions, Murat BAYRAM, Director and Head of EMR European Non-Ferrous, added that free and fair trade of non-ferrous metal scrap is vital to the recycling industry’s competitiveness and ability to invest in innovation to recover hard to recycle materials.

Olivier Francois, Vice-President of EuRIC, concluded the debate by stressing the inherent global nature of metals in general and the readiness of the recycling industry to provide high quality recycled materials provided there is a market in Europe, which adequately value the environmental and economic benefits it brings to society as a whole.

April 2021 crude steel production

Africa produced 1.3 Mt in April 2021, up 93.9% on April 2020. Asia and Oceania produced 125.0 Mt, up 19.2%. The CIS produced 9.0 Mt, up 20.7%. The EU (27) produced 12.9 Mt, up 42.8%. Europe, Other produced 4.2 Mt, up 33.9% The Middle East produced 3.5 Mt, up 15.3%. North America produced 9.7 Mt, up 38.2%. South America produced 3.8 Mt, up 70.9%.

Top 10 steel-producing countries

China produced 97.9 Mt in April 2021, up 13.4% on April 2020. India produced 8.3 Mt, up 152.1%. Japan produced 7.8 Mt, up 18.9%. The United States produced 6.9 Mt, up 43.0%. Russia is estimated to have produced 6.5 Mt, up 15.1%. South Korea is estimated to have produced 5.9 Mt, up 15.4%. Germany produced 3.4 Mt, up 31.5%. Turkey produced 3.3 Mt, up 46.6%. Brazil produced 3.1 Mt, up 59.3%. Iran is estimated to have produced 2.5 Mt, up 6.4%.

April 2021 crude steel production

Africa produced 1.3 Mt in April 2021, up 93.9% on April 2020. Asia and Oceania produced 125.0 Mt, up 19.2%. The CIS produced 9.0 Mt, up 20.7%. The EU (27) produced 12.9 Mt, up 42.8%. Europe, Other produced 4.2 Mt, up 33.9% The Middle East produced 3.5 Mt, up 15.3%. North America produced 9.7 Mt, up 38.2%. South America produced 3.8 Mt, up 70.9%.

Top 10 steel-producing countries

China produced 97.9 Mt in April 2021, up 13.4% on April 2020. India produced 8.3 Mt, up 152.1%. Japan produced 7.8 Mt, up 18.9%. The United States produced 6.9 Mt, up 43.0%. Russia is estimated to have produced 6.5 Mt, up 15.1%. South Korea is estimated to have produced 5.9 Mt, up 15.4%. Germany produced 3.4 Mt, up 31.5%. Turkey produced 3.3 Mt, up 46.6%. Brazil produced 3.1 Mt, up 59.3%. Iran is estimated to have produced 2.5 Mt, up 6.4%.

April 2021 crude steel production

Africa produced 1.3 Mt in April 2021, up 93.9% on April 2020. Asia and Oceania produced 125.0 Mt, up 19.2%. The CIS produced 9.0 Mt, up 20.7%. The EU (27) produced 12.9 Mt, up 42.8%. Europe, Other produced 4.2 Mt, up 33.9% The Middle East produced 3.5 Mt, up 15.3%. North America produced 9.7 Mt, up 38.2%. South America produced 3.8 Mt, up 70.9%.

Top 10 steel-producing countries

China produced 97.9 Mt in April 2021, up 13.4% on April 2020. India produced 8.3 Mt, up 152.1%. Japan produced 7.8 Mt, up 18.9%. The United States produced 6.9 Mt, up 43.0%. Russia is estimated to have produced 6.5 Mt, up 15.1%. South Korea is estimated to have produced 5.9 Mt, up 15.4%. Germany produced 3.4 Mt, up 31.5%. Turkey produced 3.3 Mt, up 46.6%. Brazil produced 3.1 Mt, up 59.3%. Iran is estimated to have produced 2.5 Mt, up 6.4%.

A Blockchain Solution for Cobalt Traceability

A global EV pioneer and one of the world’s leading battery makers are also part of the pilot. Tested in real operating conditions, from upstream cobalt production sites in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) to downstream electric vehicle production sites, the pilot will run until the end of 2021, with the roll-out of the final solution expected in 2022.

Assured through blockchain technology, the solution is a unique industry partnership between EV supply chain majors aiming to accelerate sustainable practices for every unit of cobalt mined, processed and used in end products. Founded by CMOC, ERG and Glencore and launched in 2019, Re-Source was later joined by Umicore, as well as a battery and EV company. It is designed with the direct input of responsible sourcing, and supply chain experts from all participating companies, proactively addressing the growing need for cobalt value chain visibility.

The collaboration between major cobalt industry players working in the DRC, deploys various technologies, including blockchain and Zero-Knowledge Proofs, to link digital flows with physical material flows on the ground. The ground-breaking solution is supported by boutique technology studio Kryha, which is experienced in carbon footprint and metals traceability and known for projects with the World Economic Forum.

To meet the consortiums’ mission of ensuring that all cobalt used in end products will be sustainably sourced, Re-Source integrates a comprehensive set of industrial sustainable mining and sourcing standards and frameworks, such as ICMM, RMI, IRMA CIRAF1, Copper Mark and others. The solution is therefore also exploring how aspects of the related GHG emissions along the value chain can be traced and disclosed.

In addition to EV supply chain majors, Re-Source is developed with the involvement of a broad group of industry advisors and stakeholders. It reflects their expectations about all aspects of sustainably sourced materials and is designed to be used by wide-ranging industry players.

Re-Source also has a direct link with the Battery Passport project of the Global Battery Alliance (GBA), through ERG, Umicore, Glencore and other Re-Source pilot partners, members of the GBA. The Battery Passport is aimed at transforming the entire value chain to make battery production more responsible and sustainable. The member companies believe that these projects support each other and together will deliver on the overarching agenda of increasing sustainability in the wider battery supply chain.

Marc Grynberg, CEO of Umicore, said: “I am proud to support Re-Source in developing a technology solution to assure traceability in the entire battery industry. For many years, Umicore has been a pioneer in promoting a sustainable value chain by only offering battery materials of a certified and ethical origin. Today, we share our expertise within this innovatory consortium and participate in the pilot to develop an industry-wide traceability technology, which is an important step towards a sustainable value chain for all batteries.”

Ivan Glasenberg, CEO of Glencore, said: “Blockchain technology offers us an unprecedented ability for traceability in the supply chain. Through this pilot, we are supporting the development of this tool for our customers who seek to understand and demonstrate the origin of the cobalt units in their products. But traceability is not enough on its own, it must be part of a wider industry effort to bring improvements to the entire cobalt supply chain. This starts with responsible sourcing compliance, for example through RMI; the collective use of wider ESG standards such as CIRAF and ICMM; and supporting the artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) sector in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) sector through multi-stakeholder initiatives like the Fair Cobalt Alliance (FCA).”

Sun Ruiwen, CEO of CMOC, said: “Re-Source is a very exciting development in global battery industry. As a global leading producer and trader of cobalt, CMOC and its trading affiliate IXM are committed to the responsible mining, processing and use of cobalt. We believe this initiative will help increase the transparency throughout the value chain. In the backdrop of the global energy transition and China pledging carbon neutrality by 2060, the battery industry is growing and expanding rapidly. A transparent and responsible supply chain, bringing together all stakeholders with this joint effort, will give end users greater confidence in cobalt as a raw material.”

Benedikt Sobotka, CEO of ERG and co-chair of the Global Battery Alliance, said: “Eurasian Resources Group prides itself on being a leading cobalt producer globally, operating the second-largest standalone cobalt production facility with a design capacity of 24 ktpa. As part of our continued efforts to ensure cobalt is responsibly sourced and processed, a key focus for ERG has been collaborating with leading public and private organisations to respond to the growing battery market powering the energy transition and the low carbon economy which is the biggest purchase order in history. Piloting the Re-Source solution is a vital milestone that brings us one step closer to unveiling the significant potential of batteries, while strengthening transparency and sustainability of battery materials across the value chain – also a mission of the Global Battery Alliance, where ERG is a founding member.”

A Blockchain Solution for Cobalt Traceability

A global EV pioneer and one of the world’s leading battery makers are also part of the pilot. Tested in real operating conditions, from upstream cobalt production sites in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) to downstream electric vehicle production sites, the pilot will run until the end of 2021, with the roll-out of the final solution expected in 2022.

Assured through blockchain technology, the solution is a unique industry partnership between EV supply chain majors aiming to accelerate sustainable practices for every unit of cobalt mined, processed and used in end products. Founded by CMOC, ERG and Glencore and launched in 2019, Re-Source was later joined by Umicore, as well as a battery and EV company. It is designed with the direct input of responsible sourcing, and supply chain experts from all participating companies, proactively addressing the growing need for cobalt value chain visibility.

The collaboration between major cobalt industry players working in the DRC, deploys various technologies, including blockchain and Zero-Knowledge Proofs, to link digital flows with physical material flows on the ground. The ground-breaking solution is supported by boutique technology studio Kryha, which is experienced in carbon footprint and metals traceability and known for projects with the World Economic Forum.

To meet the consortiums’ mission of ensuring that all cobalt used in end products will be sustainably sourced, Re-Source integrates a comprehensive set of industrial sustainable mining and sourcing standards and frameworks, such as ICMM, RMI, IRMA CIRAF1, Copper Mark and others. The solution is therefore also exploring how aspects of the related GHG emissions along the value chain can be traced and disclosed.

In addition to EV supply chain majors, Re-Source is developed with the involvement of a broad group of industry advisors and stakeholders. It reflects their expectations about all aspects of sustainably sourced materials and is designed to be used by wide-ranging industry players.

Re-Source also has a direct link with the Battery Passport project of the Global Battery Alliance (GBA), through ERG, Umicore, Glencore and other Re-Source pilot partners, members of the GBA. The Battery Passport is aimed at transforming the entire value chain to make battery production more responsible and sustainable. The member companies believe that these projects support each other and together will deliver on the overarching agenda of increasing sustainability in the wider battery supply chain.

Marc Grynberg, CEO of Umicore, said: “I am proud to support Re-Source in developing a technology solution to assure traceability in the entire battery industry. For many years, Umicore has been a pioneer in promoting a sustainable value chain by only offering battery materials of a certified and ethical origin. Today, we share our expertise within this innovatory consortium and participate in the pilot to develop an industry-wide traceability technology, which is an important step towards a sustainable value chain for all batteries.”

Ivan Glasenberg, CEO of Glencore, said: “Blockchain technology offers us an unprecedented ability for traceability in the supply chain. Through this pilot, we are supporting the development of this tool for our customers who seek to understand and demonstrate the origin of the cobalt units in their products. But traceability is not enough on its own, it must be part of a wider industry effort to bring improvements to the entire cobalt supply chain. This starts with responsible sourcing compliance, for example through RMI; the collective use of wider ESG standards such as CIRAF and ICMM; and supporting the artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) sector in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) sector through multi-stakeholder initiatives like the Fair Cobalt Alliance (FCA).”

Sun Ruiwen, CEO of CMOC, said: “Re-Source is a very exciting development in global battery industry. As a global leading producer and trader of cobalt, CMOC and its trading affiliate IXM are committed to the responsible mining, processing and use of cobalt. We believe this initiative will help increase the transparency throughout the value chain. In the backdrop of the global energy transition and China pledging carbon neutrality by 2060, the battery industry is growing and expanding rapidly. A transparent and responsible supply chain, bringing together all stakeholders with this joint effort, will give end users greater confidence in cobalt as a raw material.”

Benedikt Sobotka, CEO of ERG and co-chair of the Global Battery Alliance, said: “Eurasian Resources Group prides itself on being a leading cobalt producer globally, operating the second-largest standalone cobalt production facility with a design capacity of 24 ktpa. As part of our continued efforts to ensure cobalt is responsibly sourced and processed, a key focus for ERG has been collaborating with leading public and private organisations to respond to the growing battery market powering the energy transition and the low carbon economy which is the biggest purchase order in history. Piloting the Re-Source solution is a vital milestone that brings us one step closer to unveiling the significant potential of batteries, while strengthening transparency and sustainability of battery materials across the value chain – also a mission of the Global Battery Alliance, where ERG is a founding member.”

A Blockchain Solution for Cobalt Traceability

A global EV pioneer and one of the world’s leading battery makers are also part of the pilot. Tested in real operating conditions, from upstream cobalt production sites in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) to downstream electric vehicle production sites, the pilot will run until the end of 2021, with the roll-out of the final solution expected in 2022.

Assured through blockchain technology, the solution is a unique industry partnership between EV supply chain majors aiming to accelerate sustainable practices for every unit of cobalt mined, processed and used in end products. Founded by CMOC, ERG and Glencore and launched in 2019, Re-Source was later joined by Umicore, as well as a battery and EV company. It is designed with the direct input of responsible sourcing, and supply chain experts from all participating companies, proactively addressing the growing need for cobalt value chain visibility.

The collaboration between major cobalt industry players working in the DRC, deploys various technologies, including blockchain and Zero-Knowledge Proofs, to link digital flows with physical material flows on the ground. The ground-breaking solution is supported by boutique technology studio Kryha, which is experienced in carbon footprint and metals traceability and known for projects with the World Economic Forum.

To meet the consortiums’ mission of ensuring that all cobalt used in end products will be sustainably sourced, Re-Source integrates a comprehensive set of industrial sustainable mining and sourcing standards and frameworks, such as ICMM, RMI, IRMA CIRAF1, Copper Mark and others. The solution is therefore also exploring how aspects of the related GHG emissions along the value chain can be traced and disclosed.

In addition to EV supply chain majors, Re-Source is developed with the involvement of a broad group of industry advisors and stakeholders. It reflects their expectations about all aspects of sustainably sourced materials and is designed to be used by wide-ranging industry players.

Re-Source also has a direct link with the Battery Passport project of the Global Battery Alliance (GBA), through ERG, Umicore, Glencore and other Re-Source pilot partners, members of the GBA. The Battery Passport is aimed at transforming the entire value chain to make battery production more responsible and sustainable. The member companies believe that these projects support each other and together will deliver on the overarching agenda of increasing sustainability in the wider battery supply chain.

Marc Grynberg, CEO of Umicore, said: “I am proud to support Re-Source in developing a technology solution to assure traceability in the entire battery industry. For many years, Umicore has been a pioneer in promoting a sustainable value chain by only offering battery materials of a certified and ethical origin. Today, we share our expertise within this innovatory consortium and participate in the pilot to develop an industry-wide traceability technology, which is an important step towards a sustainable value chain for all batteries.”

Ivan Glasenberg, CEO of Glencore, said: “Blockchain technology offers us an unprecedented ability for traceability in the supply chain. Through this pilot, we are supporting the development of this tool for our customers who seek to understand and demonstrate the origin of the cobalt units in their products. But traceability is not enough on its own, it must be part of a wider industry effort to bring improvements to the entire cobalt supply chain. This starts with responsible sourcing compliance, for example through RMI; the collective use of wider ESG standards such as CIRAF and ICMM; and supporting the artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) sector in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) sector through multi-stakeholder initiatives like the Fair Cobalt Alliance (FCA).”

Sun Ruiwen, CEO of CMOC, said: “Re-Source is a very exciting development in global battery industry. As a global leading producer and trader of cobalt, CMOC and its trading affiliate IXM are committed to the responsible mining, processing and use of cobalt. We believe this initiative will help increase the transparency throughout the value chain. In the backdrop of the global energy transition and China pledging carbon neutrality by 2060, the battery industry is growing and expanding rapidly. A transparent and responsible supply chain, bringing together all stakeholders with this joint effort, will give end users greater confidence in cobalt as a raw material.”

Benedikt Sobotka, CEO of ERG and co-chair of the Global Battery Alliance, said: “Eurasian Resources Group prides itself on being a leading cobalt producer globally, operating the second-largest standalone cobalt production facility with a design capacity of 24 ktpa. As part of our continued efforts to ensure cobalt is responsibly sourced and processed, a key focus for ERG has been collaborating with leading public and private organisations to respond to the growing battery market powering the energy transition and the low carbon economy which is the biggest purchase order in history. Piloting the Re-Source solution is a vital milestone that brings us one step closer to unveiling the significant potential of batteries, while strengthening transparency and sustainability of battery materials across the value chain – also a mission of the Global Battery Alliance, where ERG is a founding member.”

Crude steel production increases in March

Global crude steel production was 486.9 Mt in the first three months of 2021, up by 10.0% compared to the same period in 2020.

Asia and Oceania produced 356.9 Mt of crude steel in the first quarter of 2021, an increase of 13.2% over the first quarter of 2020.

The EU (27) produced 37.8 Mt of crude steel in the first quarter of 2021, up by 3.1% compared to the same quarter of 2020.

North America’s crude steel production in the first three months of 2021 was 28.1 Mt, a decrease of 5.2% compared to the first quarter of 2020.

The CIS produced 26.2 Mt of crude steel in the first quarter of 2021, an increase of 3.1% over the first quarter of 2020.