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Metal scrap

Crude steel production increases in March

Global crude steel production was 486.9 Mt in the first three months of 2021, up by 10.0% compared to the same period in 2020.

Asia and Oceania produced 356.9 Mt of crude steel in the first quarter of 2021, an increase of 13.2% over the first quarter of 2020.

The EU (27) produced 37.8 Mt of crude steel in the first quarter of 2021, up by 3.1% compared to the same quarter of 2020.

North America’s crude steel production in the first three months of 2021 was 28.1 Mt, a decrease of 5.2% compared to the first quarter of 2020.

The CIS produced 26.2 Mt of crude steel in the first quarter of 2021, an increase of 3.1% over the first quarter of 2020.

Crude steel production increases in March

Global crude steel production was 486.9 Mt in the first three months of 2021, up by 10.0% compared to the same period in 2020.

Asia and Oceania produced 356.9 Mt of crude steel in the first quarter of 2021, an increase of 13.2% over the first quarter of 2020.

The EU (27) produced 37.8 Mt of crude steel in the first quarter of 2021, up by 3.1% compared to the same quarter of 2020.

North America’s crude steel production in the first three months of 2021 was 28.1 Mt, a decrease of 5.2% compared to the first quarter of 2020.

The CIS produced 26.2 Mt of crude steel in the first quarter of 2021, an increase of 3.1% over the first quarter of 2020.

Crude steel production increases in March

Global crude steel production was 486.9 Mt in the first three months of 2021, up by 10.0% compared to the same period in 2020.

Asia and Oceania produced 356.9 Mt of crude steel in the first quarter of 2021, an increase of 13.2% over the first quarter of 2020.

The EU (27) produced 37.8 Mt of crude steel in the first quarter of 2021, up by 3.1% compared to the same quarter of 2020.

North America’s crude steel production in the first three months of 2021 was 28.1 Mt, a decrease of 5.2% compared to the first quarter of 2020.

The CIS produced 26.2 Mt of crude steel in the first quarter of 2021, an increase of 3.1% over the first quarter of 2020.

Global Recycling Foundations Reforestation Initiative

The event, held in conjunction with the Global Recycling Foundation (GRF), also marked 20 years in business by Recycled Products. The company was honored to have the founding president of the GRF, Ranjit Baxi, join with managing director Susie Burrage in planting the first tree – a Prunus Cherry Plum, which had just started to blossom. The other trees include beech, which have come to symbolise the idyllic Chilterns countryside.

Recycled Products is leading the way in backing the UK’s goal to be net carbon neutral by 2050. By using recycled copper, CO2 emissions can be reduced by 65% compared to use of mined primary copper, for example. Recycling aluminium gives a higher 92% reduction, and the figure is a headline, 99% for recycled lead.

Susie Burrage, managing director of Recycled Products, said: “All recycled materials are inherently low carbon, so metal recyclers have a key role to play as society looks to cut CO2 emissions in the decades ahead. This doesn’t absolve us of all responsibility for working on reducing our own carbon footprint, however.

“Global Recycling Day is a great reminder that we all – from individuals to large companies and governments – must play our part in achieving net-zero carbon emissions and limit the worst effects of climate change.

“Those of us working in the recycling sector are more aware of this than most and are therefore making every effort to limit our carbon emissions. Recycled Products are offsetting unavoidable emissions by planting trees.”

Leading metal Recyclers mark 4th Global Recycling Day by setting ambitious net zero emission targets

Major recycling companies, such as European Metal Management (EMR) and Sims Metal Management, want to help meet growing consumer demand for more eco-friendly, recycled products.

In the past decade, investment in state-of-the-art technology has seen the metal recycling industry utilise vision systems, artificial intelligence (AI) and robot technology to improve the efficiency and quality of processing, creating less carbon intensive materials for manufacturers.

The industry has also developed innovative partnerships with a wide range of sectors, using its insight and expertise to ‘eco design’ the products of the future which are both less carbon intensive during their lifetimes and more easily recycled or repurposed at end-of-life.

These efforts help protect biodiversity as recycling removes waste from the environment and cuts the volume of virgin material needed by manufacturers avoiding the destruction of precious habitats around the world.

Susie Burrage, President of the British Metals Recycling Association said: “All recycled materials are inherently low carbon, so metal recyclers have a great starting point as we look to cut CO2 emissions in the decades ahead. This, however, does not mitigate us of the responsibility of working on reducing our own carbon footprint. Global Recycling Day is a great reminder that we all must play our part in achieving net-zero and limit the worst effects of climate change.”

Ian Sheppard, Managing Director of Metal Recycling at EMR, said: “There’s lots of evidence that manufacturers and governments can achieve massive reductions in carbon emissions by using recovered materials. Meanwhile, the recycling sector itself is a comparatively low emissions industry, with businesses across the sector investing in improved technology and research, which will further reduce our environmental impact.”

Leading metal Recyclers mark 4th Global Recycling Day by setting ambitious net zero emission targets

Major recycling companies, such as European Metal Management (EMR) and Sims Metal Management, want to help meet growing consumer demand for more eco-friendly, recycled products.

In the past decade, investment in state-of-the-art technology has seen the metal recycling industry utilise vision systems, artificial intelligence (AI) and robot technology to improve the efficiency and quality of processing, creating less carbon intensive materials for manufacturers.

The industry has also developed innovative partnerships with a wide range of sectors, using its insight and expertise to ‘eco design’ the products of the future which are both less carbon intensive during their lifetimes and more easily recycled or repurposed at end-of-life.

These efforts help protect biodiversity as recycling removes waste from the environment and cuts the volume of virgin material needed by manufacturers avoiding the destruction of precious habitats around the world.

Susie Burrage, President of the British Metals Recycling Association said: “All recycled materials are inherently low carbon, so metal recyclers have a great starting point as we look to cut CO2 emissions in the decades ahead. This, however, does not mitigate us of the responsibility of working on reducing our own carbon footprint. Global Recycling Day is a great reminder that we all must play our part in achieving net-zero and limit the worst effects of climate change.”

Ian Sheppard, Managing Director of Metal Recycling at EMR, said: “There’s lots of evidence that manufacturers and governments can achieve massive reductions in carbon emissions by using recovered materials. Meanwhile, the recycling sector itself is a comparatively low emissions industry, with businesses across the sector investing in improved technology and research, which will further reduce our environmental impact.”

APEAL announces 2025 vision for recycling

The 2025 Vision is set to be supported by action in four key areas, identified by the Association as critical in the drive to prevent steel packaging being diverted from recycling and wasted.

Alexis Van Maercke, secretary general of APEAL, said: “The four key areas of action will include a focus on optimising separate waste collection, establishing a scrap quality standard, the collection and sorting of steel closures, and designing for recyclability.
“As APEAL’s recycling report published in 2018 illustrates, separate collection is the best way of guaranteeing high-quality input into recycling operations. It was therefore encouraging to see this highlighted in the Circular Economy Action Plan (CEAP) 2.0 report adopted by the European Parliament last 9th February.

“Establishing a scrap quality standard is equally important. Crucially, to maintain quality in the steel for packaging scrap value chain, quality control must start when the material is at the sorting facility. This can only be achieved by establishing a quality standard for packaging steel scrap.”

Whilst an average of 82,5% of all steel packaging is currently recycled across Europe, the collection and sorting of steel closures in Europe is estimated to be below-average, with steel closures regularly put in the wrong waste bin (and often in the residual waste bin) by citizens.

Mr Van Maercke continued: “Improving the recycling rate of steel closures will make a significant contribution in the drive towards zero steel packaging to landfill. But there is currently a lack of clear sorting instructions and low awareness among citizens. At the same time ineffective sorting techniques in a number of facilities result in collected steel closures being lost and not recycled.”

APEAL also believes designing for recyclability will underpin the successful implementation of all these measures, helping to ensure that every product placed on the market, can be recycled as efficiently as possible.

“Ultimately, steel packaging is a valuable resource which cannot be wasted if we are to achieve the objectives of the European Green Deal. APEAL will continue to work with its colleagues, the European Commission, European Parliament, Member States and all stakeholders to realise a shared ambition of a truly circular economy.”

A new APEAL report, ‘Why Steel recycles forever – How to collect, sort & recycle steel for packaging’, designed to help stakeholders throughout the value chain work collaboratively to achieve the 2025 Vision, is set to be published in December 2021.

At the same time, APEAL will reveal a new recycling rate objective in line with the new EU calculation methodology. Applicable for data from 2020, this new methodology moves the calculation point for all members states and all packaging materials, to the entrance of the recycling operation. This means that no impurities can be included and only materials that are really recycled can be included in the measurement process.

Mr Van Maercke added: “Indeed, APEAL will release the 2019 steel recycling rate in May this year. But towards the end of the year we aim to be the first material to release our figures with the new methodology.”

APEAL announces 2025 vision for recycling

The 2025 Vision is set to be supported by action in four key areas, identified by the Association as critical in the drive to prevent steel packaging being diverted from recycling and wasted.

Alexis Van Maercke, secretary general of APEAL, said: “The four key areas of action will include a focus on optimising separate waste collection, establishing a scrap quality standard, the collection and sorting of steel closures, and designing for recyclability.
“As APEAL’s recycling report published in 2018 illustrates, separate collection is the best way of guaranteeing high-quality input into recycling operations. It was therefore encouraging to see this highlighted in the Circular Economy Action Plan (CEAP) 2.0 report adopted by the European Parliament last 9th February.

“Establishing a scrap quality standard is equally important. Crucially, to maintain quality in the steel for packaging scrap value chain, quality control must start when the material is at the sorting facility. This can only be achieved by establishing a quality standard for packaging steel scrap.”

Whilst an average of 82,5% of all steel packaging is currently recycled across Europe, the collection and sorting of steel closures in Europe is estimated to be below-average, with steel closures regularly put in the wrong waste bin (and often in the residual waste bin) by citizens.

Mr Van Maercke continued: “Improving the recycling rate of steel closures will make a significant contribution in the drive towards zero steel packaging to landfill. But there is currently a lack of clear sorting instructions and low awareness among citizens. At the same time ineffective sorting techniques in a number of facilities result in collected steel closures being lost and not recycled.”

APEAL also believes designing for recyclability will underpin the successful implementation of all these measures, helping to ensure that every product placed on the market, can be recycled as efficiently as possible.

“Ultimately, steel packaging is a valuable resource which cannot be wasted if we are to achieve the objectives of the European Green Deal. APEAL will continue to work with its colleagues, the European Commission, European Parliament, Member States and all stakeholders to realise a shared ambition of a truly circular economy.”

A new APEAL report, ‘Why Steel recycles forever – How to collect, sort & recycle steel for packaging’, designed to help stakeholders throughout the value chain work collaboratively to achieve the 2025 Vision, is set to be published in December 2021.

At the same time, APEAL will reveal a new recycling rate objective in line with the new EU calculation methodology. Applicable for data from 2020, this new methodology moves the calculation point for all members states and all packaging materials, to the entrance of the recycling operation. This means that no impurities can be included and only materials that are really recycled can be included in the measurement process.

Mr Van Maercke added: “Indeed, APEAL will release the 2019 steel recycling rate in May this year. But towards the end of the year we aim to be the first material to release our figures with the new methodology.”

APEAL announces 2025 vision for recycling

The 2025 Vision is set to be supported by action in four key areas, identified by the Association as critical in the drive to prevent steel packaging being diverted from recycling and wasted.

Alexis Van Maercke, secretary general of APEAL, said: “The four key areas of action will include a focus on optimising separate waste collection, establishing a scrap quality standard, the collection and sorting of steel closures, and designing for recyclability.
“As APEAL’s recycling report published in 2018 illustrates, separate collection is the best way of guaranteeing high-quality input into recycling operations. It was therefore encouraging to see this highlighted in the Circular Economy Action Plan (CEAP) 2.0 report adopted by the European Parliament last 9th February.

“Establishing a scrap quality standard is equally important. Crucially, to maintain quality in the steel for packaging scrap value chain, quality control must start when the material is at the sorting facility. This can only be achieved by establishing a quality standard for packaging steel scrap.”

Whilst an average of 82,5% of all steel packaging is currently recycled across Europe, the collection and sorting of steel closures in Europe is estimated to be below-average, with steel closures regularly put in the wrong waste bin (and often in the residual waste bin) by citizens.

Mr Van Maercke continued: “Improving the recycling rate of steel closures will make a significant contribution in the drive towards zero steel packaging to landfill. But there is currently a lack of clear sorting instructions and low awareness among citizens. At the same time ineffective sorting techniques in a number of facilities result in collected steel closures being lost and not recycled.”

APEAL also believes designing for recyclability will underpin the successful implementation of all these measures, helping to ensure that every product placed on the market, can be recycled as efficiently as possible.

“Ultimately, steel packaging is a valuable resource which cannot be wasted if we are to achieve the objectives of the European Green Deal. APEAL will continue to work with its colleagues, the European Commission, European Parliament, Member States and all stakeholders to realise a shared ambition of a truly circular economy.”

A new APEAL report, ‘Why Steel recycles forever – How to collect, sort & recycle steel for packaging’, designed to help stakeholders throughout the value chain work collaboratively to achieve the 2025 Vision, is set to be published in December 2021.

At the same time, APEAL will reveal a new recycling rate objective in line with the new EU calculation methodology. Applicable for data from 2020, this new methodology moves the calculation point for all members states and all packaging materials, to the entrance of the recycling operation. This means that no impurities can be included and only materials that are really recycled can be included in the measurement process.

Mr Van Maercke added: “Indeed, APEAL will release the 2019 steel recycling rate in May this year. But towards the end of the year we aim to be the first material to release our figures with the new methodology.”

APEAL announces 2025 vision for recycling

The 2025 Vision is set to be supported by action in four key areas, identified by the Association as critical in the drive to prevent steel packaging being diverted from recycling and wasted.

Alexis Van Maercke, secretary general of APEAL, said: “The four key areas of action will include a focus on optimising separate waste collection, establishing a scrap quality standard, the collection and sorting of steel closures, and designing for recyclability.
“As APEAL’s recycling report published in 2018 illustrates, separate collection is the best way of guaranteeing high-quality input into recycling operations. It was therefore encouraging to see this highlighted in the Circular Economy Action Plan (CEAP) 2.0 report adopted by the European Parliament last 9th February.

“Establishing a scrap quality standard is equally important. Crucially, to maintain quality in the steel for packaging scrap value chain, quality control must start when the material is at the sorting facility. This can only be achieved by establishing a quality standard for packaging steel scrap.”

Whilst an average of 82,5% of all steel packaging is currently recycled across Europe, the collection and sorting of steel closures in Europe is estimated to be below-average, with steel closures regularly put in the wrong waste bin (and often in the residual waste bin) by citizens.

Mr Van Maercke continued: “Improving the recycling rate of steel closures will make a significant contribution in the drive towards zero steel packaging to landfill. But there is currently a lack of clear sorting instructions and low awareness among citizens. At the same time ineffective sorting techniques in a number of facilities result in collected steel closures being lost and not recycled.”

APEAL also believes designing for recyclability will underpin the successful implementation of all these measures, helping to ensure that every product placed on the market, can be recycled as efficiently as possible.

“Ultimately, steel packaging is a valuable resource which cannot be wasted if we are to achieve the objectives of the European Green Deal. APEAL will continue to work with its colleagues, the European Commission, European Parliament, Member States and all stakeholders to realise a shared ambition of a truly circular economy.”

A new APEAL report, ‘Why Steel recycles forever – How to collect, sort & recycle steel for packaging’, designed to help stakeholders throughout the value chain work collaboratively to achieve the 2025 Vision, is set to be published in December 2021.

At the same time, APEAL will reveal a new recycling rate objective in line with the new EU calculation methodology. Applicable for data from 2020, this new methodology moves the calculation point for all members states and all packaging materials, to the entrance of the recycling operation. This means that no impurities can be included and only materials that are really recycled can be included in the measurement process.

Mr Van Maercke added: “Indeed, APEAL will release the 2019 steel recycling rate in May this year. But towards the end of the year we aim to be the first material to release our figures with the new methodology.”