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Science & technology

New visualization software from Sesotec

The Visudesk visualization software consists of a browser-based dashboard that can be easily accessed via desktop, tablet, or smartphone. Reports and statistics are delivered to enable centralized monitoring and management of all sorting processes, helping to improve product quality as well as process efficiency. It is also possible to configure custom e-mail notifications to responsible employees in the event of critical machine conditions that could lead to equipment failure.

With Visudesk visualization software, you can see all process and usage data from your interconnected Sesotec sorting and metal detection devices in one comprehensive dashboard. This dashboard provides a complete overview of your entire sorting line as well as information about specific groups of devices, enabling you to quickly create equipment configurations and automate product changeovers. As required, Sesotec technicians also provide process optimization support.

Instant, process-wide feedback about equipment status and throughput makes it possible to continuously improve your processes. With more power to monitor and control your processes and sorted materials, productivity and efficiency climb — leading in turn to greater profitability. Furthermore, preventative maintenance contributes to a reduction in unplanned downtime, helping your sorting processes to continue creating maximal value with minimal malfunctions.

Greater operational reliability in scrap and aluminium recycling

In situations, for example, where recovered, recycled aluminium is being used to produce new products, aluminium manufacturers need their secondary raw materials to display consistently high levels of purity. This is one of the challenges solved by sorting technology. Dry density sorting using x-ray transmission is a proven method that is used by hundreds of metal recycling firms around the globe. Simply considering processors of the high-performance material aluminium, the sorting machine is used to separate free heavy metals, aluminium compounds, free magnesium and wrought and cast aluminium parts. Steinert’s ongoing development work now ensures specific benefits for the sorting process.

EVO 5.0 generation with new functions
New software: Multilayer Data Evaluation provides even more distinguishing criteria and the automatic x-ray monitoring and calibration of the x-ray sensors help achieve consistently high levels of detection and sorting quality. Photo: Steinert

Thanks to Multilayer Data Evaluation (MDE), the sorting machine is able to use even more distinguishing criteria for detection thanks to high-resolution object recognition and by undertaking classification in parallel. Complex sorting tasks, such as magnesium detection are solved easily. Automatic x-ray monitoring and calibration (AXM) of the x-ray sensors help achieve consistently high detection and sorting quality.

The high-resolution valve pitch of 6.25 mm enables even more efficient sorting of fine material down to 5mm. Photo: Steinert

The hardware has also been improved. The high-resolution valve pitch of 6.25 mm enables even more efficient sorting of fine material down to 5 mm. The x-ray scan area is cleaned automatically in the new generation of machines. This vastly reduces the amount of manual cleaning needed and maintains a consistently high level of detection quality. The 4-year warranty for the x-ray source and sensors provides operational reliability and keeps operating costs low.

A so-called solution guide can be downloaded as an e-book to provide an initial overview of the opportunities provided for sorting aluminium scrap and other materials. Although aluminium scrap comes from different sources like profiles and plates, incineration bottom ash, shredder systems or Dense Media Separation (DMS), the rough stages of the sorting process are similar: recovering non-ferrous metals and upgrading the recovered metals, in other words, producing pure metal types. The e-book provides insight into both the heart of the systems – the Steinert XSS T EVO 5.0 – as well as the upstream magnet technology and downstream fluorescence technology; of benefit to operators of aluminium shredders, secondary smelters or processors of waste incinerator ash. The downstream fluorescence technology produces pure heavy metal fractions such as copper, brass and zinc.

Download e-book

Weltec Biopower delivers two biogas plants to Japan

One of the plants is being set up in Urahoro on Japan‘s island of Hokkaido. The second plant is being built in Sakata in the prefecture of Yamagato on Honshu, the largest island. The structural design of the two biogas plants takes the earthquake risk in these regions into consideration. The generated power and heat will be used directly on site in order to enable energy autonomy. The commissioning will take place in summer 2021 in Urahoro and in autumn 2021 in Sakata.

Following the Fukushima nuclear disaster in March 2011 and thanks to the support of renewable energies, biogas enjoys a good reputation in Japan. Among the renewable energies, biogas is considered to be a weather-independent energy source that makes a significant contribution to the required grid stability. Additionally, the preconditions for the development of biogas are favourable, since despite the limited availability of other raw materials, Japan boasts plenty of biomass potential. Efforts to promote biogas projects had already started in 2002. A short while thereafter, Welten built its first„Made in Germany“ plant in Japan. However, the pace of development in this area picked up only after the government introduced the feed-in tariff for green energy in July 2012.

Weltec‘s latest biogas projects in Japan are hybrid dairy farms. This means that the embryos of special beef cattle breeds are transferred to dairy cows, allowing the farm to produce both milk and beef. Every year, the two locations of an agricultural company group yield approximately 30,000 t of liquid cattle manure, which will be used for the energy production in the anaerobic digestion plants. To ensure efficient digestion, Weltec Biopower is setting up one stainless-steel digester in Urahoro. In Sakata, Weltec is building two digesters, as the animal headcount will soon be increased. With a height of 6.3 m and a diameter of 25.34 m, the three bioreactors will each have a capacity of 3,176 m3. The benefits of stainless-steel tanks include compact shipping in just a few containers from Europe to Japan and easy adaptation to the structural requirements in earthquake regions.

At the Urahoro site on Hokkaido, the liquid substrates will be pumped to the digester from three upstream storage tanks. Two of the three pre-storages are already in place, but are being furnished with state-of-the-art technology. WELTEC is building the third pre-storage tank with a capacity of 393 m3 from scratch. Its height is 5.03 m, and its diameter measures 9.98 m. A pre-storage of the same size is also being set up in Sakata. Due to the cold winters with a lot of snow, the pre- storage tanks at the two locations will be insulated and furnished with gas-tight double-membrane roofs. Additionally, Weltec is setting up a digestate storage tank with a capacity of 524 m3 for each location. Following the separation, the digestate will be spread on the company‘s own fields as fertiliser. Apart from the digesters, upstream and digestate storage tanks, separation and pump technology, Weltec Biopower is also setting up a 250-kW CHP unit at each of the locations.

Based on the customer’s specification, the plants will run in parallel grid operation. Therefore, both construction projects are viewed as pilot projects in Japan. The fact that the power will not be fed into the grid, but will be used for the rotary milking parlour and other facilities, makes the operator more independent from the power grid. This makes sense from an economic perspective, as the grid capacity and stability in Japan is endangered especially in the earthquake areas. The fact that the framework conditions for the development of bioenergy are favourable is a great advantage: The yearly biomass potential in Japan amounts to approximately 284.4 million t, enough to produce about 13 billion kWh of electricity and continually supply 2.8 million households. At the bottom line, the efficient utilisation of raw material in biogas plants such as in Urahoro and Sakata contributes to the economic viability, eco-compatibility and security of supply and thus to the success of the energy transition in Japan.

Weltec Biopower delivers two biogas plants to Japan

One of the plants is being set up in Urahoro on Japan‘s island of Hokkaido. The second plant is being built in Sakata in the prefecture of Yamagato on Honshu, the largest island. The structural design of the two biogas plants takes the earthquake risk in these regions into consideration. The generated power and heat will be used directly on site in order to enable energy autonomy. The commissioning will take place in summer 2021 in Urahoro and in autumn 2021 in Sakata.

Following the Fukushima nuclear disaster in March 2011 and thanks to the support of renewable energies, biogas enjoys a good reputation in Japan. Among the renewable energies, biogas is considered to be a weather-independent energy source that makes a significant contribution to the required grid stability. Additionally, the preconditions for the development of biogas are favourable, since despite the limited availability of other raw materials, Japan boasts plenty of biomass potential. Efforts to promote biogas projects had already started in 2002. A short while thereafter, Welten built its first„Made in Germany“ plant in Japan. However, the pace of development in this area picked up only after the government introduced the feed-in tariff for green energy in July 2012.

Weltec‘s latest biogas projects in Japan are hybrid dairy farms. This means that the embryos of special beef cattle breeds are transferred to dairy cows, allowing the farm to produce both milk and beef. Every year, the two locations of an agricultural company group yield approximately 30,000 t of liquid cattle manure, which will be used for the energy production in the anaerobic digestion plants. To ensure efficient digestion, Weltec Biopower is setting up one stainless-steel digester in Urahoro. In Sakata, Weltec is building two digesters, as the animal headcount will soon be increased. With a height of 6.3 m and a diameter of 25.34 m, the three bioreactors will each have a capacity of 3,176 m3. The benefits of stainless-steel tanks include compact shipping in just a few containers from Europe to Japan and easy adaptation to the structural requirements in earthquake regions.

At the Urahoro site on Hokkaido, the liquid substrates will be pumped to the digester from three upstream storage tanks. Two of the three pre-storages are already in place, but are being furnished with state-of-the-art technology. WELTEC is building the third pre-storage tank with a capacity of 393 m3 from scratch. Its height is 5.03 m, and its diameter measures 9.98 m. A pre-storage of the same size is also being set up in Sakata. Due to the cold winters with a lot of snow, the pre- storage tanks at the two locations will be insulated and furnished with gas-tight double-membrane roofs. Additionally, Weltec is setting up a digestate storage tank with a capacity of 524 m3 for each location. Following the separation, the digestate will be spread on the company‘s own fields as fertiliser. Apart from the digesters, upstream and digestate storage tanks, separation and pump technology, Weltec Biopower is also setting up a 250-kW CHP unit at each of the locations.

Based on the customer’s specification, the plants will run in parallel grid operation. Therefore, both construction projects are viewed as pilot projects in Japan. The fact that the power will not be fed into the grid, but will be used for the rotary milking parlour and other facilities, makes the operator more independent from the power grid. This makes sense from an economic perspective, as the grid capacity and stability in Japan is endangered especially in the earthquake areas. The fact that the framework conditions for the development of bioenergy are favourable is a great advantage: The yearly biomass potential in Japan amounts to approximately 284.4 million t, enough to produce about 13 billion kWh of electricity and continually supply 2.8 million households. At the bottom line, the efficient utilisation of raw material in biogas plants such as in Urahoro and Sakata contributes to the economic viability, eco-compatibility and security of supply and thus to the success of the energy transition in Japan.

Andritz signs cooperation agreement with Linetechnology

The modular processing plants with flexible configurations are sold under the name of Blueline and enable decentralized recycling and economical processing of small quantities of residual industrial waste fractions.

Andritz will provide the required shredding technology and supply equipment from the ADuro product series for universal and fine shredding. The ADuro shredders will be tuned to the special requirements of the Blueline modules and can be used in different areas of applications, for example the treatment of plastic, substitute fuels, wood or cables. Their biggest advantages are the flexibility of the shredder modules for single-stage shredding and the high-performance, fine classification system with an integrated separation stage.

Linetechnology is headquartered in Waidhofen an der Ybbs, Austria, and was founded in 2019 as an independent affiliate of IFE Aufbereitungstechnik GmbH. The company develops, produces and sells modular, container-based processing plants under the product name BLUELINE. These plants can be reconfigured dynamically and cover virtually all established process steps in dry mechanical-physical processing of residual materials.

Andritz signs cooperation agreement with Linetechnology

The modular processing plants with flexible configurations are sold under the name of Blueline and enable decentralized recycling and economical processing of small quantities of residual industrial waste fractions.

Andritz will provide the required shredding technology and supply equipment from the ADuro product series for universal and fine shredding. The ADuro shredders will be tuned to the special requirements of the Blueline modules and can be used in different areas of applications, for example the treatment of plastic, substitute fuels, wood or cables. Their biggest advantages are the flexibility of the shredder modules for single-stage shredding and the high-performance, fine classification system with an integrated separation stage.

Linetechnology is headquartered in Waidhofen an der Ybbs, Austria, and was founded in 2019 as an independent affiliate of IFE Aufbereitungstechnik GmbH. The company develops, produces and sells modular, container-based processing plants under the product name BLUELINE. These plants can be reconfigured dynamically and cover virtually all established process steps in dry mechanical-physical processing of residual materials.

New polystyrene design for recycling guideline published by RecyClass

Any company wishing to verify the recyclability of its PS packaging can now consult the guidelines or use the free online RecyClass tool which incorporates the RecyClass Design for Recycling Guidelines.

“As polystyrene packaging is not widely recycled in the EU yet, development of this new guideline is pivotal in getting recycling of polystyrene-based packaging off the ground”, said David Eslava, RecyClass PS Technical Committee Chairman & Deputy Director at Eslava Plasticos, he continued: It is a very necessary step to give a clear direction to the industry”.
Each element of packaging plays a crucial role in ensuring its recyclability at the end of its use phase. That is where Design for Recycling Guidelines come into play as they offer a coherent insight into how different components must be manufactured to be compatible with recycling to, eventually, be recycled back into high-end applications.

PS Coloured Containers Guideline was elaborated by the experts from across the value chain represented in the respective RecyClass Technical Committee. By reporting on the behaviour of packaging in a PS containers’ recycling stream the guideline enables to determine whether a package will be assigned full, low, or no compatibility. Different components of a PS packaging such as closure systems, lids, labels, or additives, are in the scope of the document. The first and foremost requirement is that the density of packaging that must be between 1 and 1,07 g/cm³. The guideline does not cover, however, the expanded polystyrene (EPS) nor extruded polystyrene (XPS).

The document adds to the existing guidelines covering polyethylene, polypropylene, polyethylene terephthalate, comprising all kinds of packaging whether flexible or rigid, including films, bottles, tubes as well as pouches, pots, and trays.

The RecyClass PS Technical Committee works equally on the PS Recyclability Protocol which will allow for scientific testing innovative technologies and packaging to continuously update the guideline which is a living document. Such an approach allows the industry to be innovative while at the same time ensuring recyclability.
With this guideline, RecyClass aims at accelerating the high-quality recycling of post-consumer styrenics packaging in Europe.

New polystyrene design for recycling guideline published by RecyClass

Any company wishing to verify the recyclability of its PS packaging can now consult the guidelines or use the free online RecyClass tool which incorporates the RecyClass Design for Recycling Guidelines.

“As polystyrene packaging is not widely recycled in the EU yet, development of this new guideline is pivotal in getting recycling of polystyrene-based packaging off the ground”, said David Eslava, RecyClass PS Technical Committee Chairman & Deputy Director at Eslava Plasticos, he continued: It is a very necessary step to give a clear direction to the industry”.
Each element of packaging plays a crucial role in ensuring its recyclability at the end of its use phase. That is where Design for Recycling Guidelines come into play as they offer a coherent insight into how different components must be manufactured to be compatible with recycling to, eventually, be recycled back into high-end applications.

PS Coloured Containers Guideline was elaborated by the experts from across the value chain represented in the respective RecyClass Technical Committee. By reporting on the behaviour of packaging in a PS containers’ recycling stream the guideline enables to determine whether a package will be assigned full, low, or no compatibility. Different components of a PS packaging such as closure systems, lids, labels, or additives, are in the scope of the document. The first and foremost requirement is that the density of packaging that must be between 1 and 1,07 g/cm³. The guideline does not cover, however, the expanded polystyrene (EPS) nor extruded polystyrene (XPS).

The document adds to the existing guidelines covering polyethylene, polypropylene, polyethylene terephthalate, comprising all kinds of packaging whether flexible or rigid, including films, bottles, tubes as well as pouches, pots, and trays.

The RecyClass PS Technical Committee works equally on the PS Recyclability Protocol which will allow for scientific testing innovative technologies and packaging to continuously update the guideline which is a living document. Such an approach allows the industry to be innovative while at the same time ensuring recyclability.
With this guideline, RecyClass aims at accelerating the high-quality recycling of post-consumer styrenics packaging in Europe.

Fishing industry by-products and municipal solid waste are transformed into bioplastics

AIMPLAS, the Plastics Technology Centre, is the coordinator of the European DAFIA Project, whose aim has been to recover municipal solid waste and marine rest raw materials from the fishing industry in order to obtain new, high value-added products and additives. The results have included flame retardants that provide an alternative to halogenated models, sustainable barrier packaging and edible coatings that extend the shelf life of food, and chemical substances that can be used to produce new plastics from renewable resources.

The fifteen partners in the project consortium have worked for the last four years on waste that appears to have no added value, including municipal solid waste (household rubbish) and the by-products of the fishing industry. Fishing industry waste was used to extract and formulate flame-retardant additives at pilot plant scale. These additives can be used in the automotive industry to increase the flame retardancy of polyamides with components that provide an alternative to halogenated flame retardants, whose use is restricted due to the danger for human health. In this case, there are two advantages: these additives have the same properties as conventional ones, and they also respect the environment and human health because they come from renewable resources. Fishing industry waste was also used to obtain alternatives to ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH, of fossil origin) that have oxygen barrier properties. This fish-gelatin-based formula can be incorporated into food packaging film or used to actually coat food in the form of an edible coating that extends its shelf life. This case is a perfect example of circularity in that fish waste is reincorporated into the production chain to package food, thus preventing the generation of waste by using it as a new resource. In the case of municipal solid waste, the use of innovative fermentation processes has made it possible to extract building blocks from sugars (carbon source) that can be used to synthesize biopolymers such as bio-based polyamides. These materials come from renewable sources and also have applications in the automotive industry.

This project was funded by the European Union Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement number 720770.
The consortium is made up of the following companies and centres:
POLITECNICO DI TORINO, SINTEF OCEAN, SINTEF INDUSTRY, DANMARKS TEKNISKE UNIVERSITET, IRCELYON, NUTRIMAR, INOVAÇÃO I RECERCA INDUSTRIAL I SOSTENIBLE, BIOTREND – INOVAÇÃO E ENGENHARIA EM BIOTECNOLOGIA, DAREN LABORATORIES & SCIENTIFIC CONSULTANTS, MINE PLASTIK, BIO BASE EUROPE PILOT PLANT, BIOPOLIS, ARKEMA IRCELYON and THE NATIONAL NON- FOOD CROPS CENTRE

Fishing industry by-products and municipal solid waste are transformed into bioplastics

AIMPLAS, the Plastics Technology Centre, is the coordinator of the European DAFIA Project, whose aim has been to recover municipal solid waste and marine rest raw materials from the fishing industry in order to obtain new, high value-added products and additives. The results have included flame retardants that provide an alternative to halogenated models, sustainable barrier packaging and edible coatings that extend the shelf life of food, and chemical substances that can be used to produce new plastics from renewable resources.

The fifteen partners in the project consortium have worked for the last four years on waste that appears to have no added value, including municipal solid waste (household rubbish) and the by-products of the fishing industry. Fishing industry waste was used to extract and formulate flame-retardant additives at pilot plant scale. These additives can be used in the automotive industry to increase the flame retardancy of polyamides with components that provide an alternative to halogenated flame retardants, whose use is restricted due to the danger for human health. In this case, there are two advantages: these additives have the same properties as conventional ones, and they also respect the environment and human health because they come from renewable resources. Fishing industry waste was also used to obtain alternatives to ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH, of fossil origin) that have oxygen barrier properties. This fish-gelatin-based formula can be incorporated into food packaging film or used to actually coat food in the form of an edible coating that extends its shelf life. This case is a perfect example of circularity in that fish waste is reincorporated into the production chain to package food, thus preventing the generation of waste by using it as a new resource. In the case of municipal solid waste, the use of innovative fermentation processes has made it possible to extract building blocks from sugars (carbon source) that can be used to synthesize biopolymers such as bio-based polyamides. These materials come from renewable sources and also have applications in the automotive industry.

This project was funded by the European Union Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement number 720770.
The consortium is made up of the following companies and centres:
POLITECNICO DI TORINO, SINTEF OCEAN, SINTEF INDUSTRY, DANMARKS TEKNISKE UNIVERSITET, IRCELYON, NUTRIMAR, INOVAÇÃO I RECERCA INDUSTRIAL I SOSTENIBLE, BIOTREND – INOVAÇÃO E ENGENHARIA EM BIOTECNOLOGIA, DAREN LABORATORIES & SCIENTIFIC CONSULTANTS, MINE PLASTIK, BIO BASE EUROPE PILOT PLANT, BIOPOLIS, ARKEMA IRCELYON and THE NATIONAL NON- FOOD CROPS CENTRE