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Son Güncelleme: 28.11.2020 13:31
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Waste paper

Latest generation Autosort boosts paper recycling

Prior to the integration of the latest Autosort models, Koppitz used Tomra’s previous Autosort models in a fully automated production process to sort several types of secondary raw materials from household mixed paper, such as newsprint, corrugated base paper and sanitary papers.

When a fire broke out in the plant, swift action was required to resume operations as quickly and efficiently as possible, while also keeping the costs of the damage to a minimum. “In the aftermath of the fire, our longstanding and trusted partner, Tomra Sorting Recycling, immediately offered their support, helping us to redesign the plant as well as providing us with the most advanced sensor-based sorting technologies available on the market today. This fantastic support further demonstrates that we made the right decision when choosing Tomra as our technology partners all those years ago,” said Plant Owner and Manager, Jürgen Koppitz.

Within a very short space of time, the plant, including the seven new Autosort units, was successfully rebuilt, reopening at the beginning of 2020. Thanks to the compact and flexible design of the Autosort units, they were easily integrated into the new plant to ensure optimal performance.

Thomas Heder, Sales Manager Central Europe at Tomra Sorting Recycling, explains: “We wanted to help Koppitz by offering both our technical expertise and design support to ensure optimal operations when the plant reopened after the fire. The flexible nature of our Autosort technology means it can react to the often complex and changing market requirements.

As a result, considerable efforts were made on our part to deliver the latest generation Autosort – which was still under development at the time – in time for the plant’s rebuild.”

Autosort in the sorting process
Photo: Tomra

Vast amounts of paper are delivered to Koppitz’s plant daily and sorted into different products. The main sorting stream – the material for deinking (newspapers, magazines, brochures, etc) – is fed into the sorting process and passes through several steps. Firstly, large cardboard boxes are sorted in the coarse screening process, while smaller materials are sorted in the fines screening process. The remaining cardboard and other impurities are then sorted by the seven new Autosort machines. Six of the units are programmed to eject unwanted contaminants, such as cardboard, cartons and polymers, using precise and powerful air jets, while the seventh unit recovers deinkable materials.

Once sorted and recovered, the deinkable material can be used in subsequent steps to manufacture various new paper products. In total, the sorting system processes more than 50 tonnes of material per hour, making a significant contribution to bringing large quantities of deinkable materials back into circulation.

The latest generation Autosort

Following continuous optimisation and further development of the long-established Autosort machines, Tomra Sorting Recycling launched its latest generation Autosort in June 2020, paving the way for resolving even the most complex of sorting tasks. The Autosort combines the most advanced sorting functions and technologies available today in one machine.

Tomra’s patented Flying Beam technology is integrated into the Autosort unit, guaranteeing an excellent, homogeneous light distribution. This ensures better detection and monitoring of the entire conveyor belt width of 2800mm, thus allowing more contaminants to be detected and ejected. Furthermore, equipping the latest Autosort machines with Tomra ‘s Sharp Eye technology ensures an improvement in light efficiency and sorting sharpness, facilitating the separation of difficult-to-sort fractions.

Philipp Knopp, Product Manager at Tomra Sorting Recycling, explains: “The colour differences of the paper fractions in the main infeed material stream are often only minimal, which makes the exceptional precision of the Autosort in differentiating between them a major advantage. Consequently, over-sorting and the exclusion of recyclable materials can be avoided.”

The Autosort units are extremely versatile and offer a number of advantages, as Jürgen Koppitz explains: “We’ve worked with Tomra ‘s Autosort units for a long time now and have always found them to be easy to operate and very adaptable to meet changing needs. This is particularly beneficial in the deinking process due to the continuously composition of the infeed mixed paper.”

Optimally equipped for deinking challenges
Photo: Tomra

Deinking – the removal of printing inks from waste paper such as newspapers and other printed products – is essential when it comes to conserving resources and promoting recycling. Producing just one tonne of recycled paper can save 17 trees, 5,443 litres of oil (1,438 gallons), 4,000 kilowatts of energy, 100,313 litres of water (26,500 gallons), 2.7 cubic metres of landfill space and 700 kg of CO2 emissions.

The difficulty, however, lies in the changing composition of recovered paper, not least because of increasing digitalisation in the paper manufacturing and a shift in purchasing behaviour towards the digital market. Also, the volume of cardboard in the plant’s infeed material is increasing sharply – rising from 25% to almost 50%.

Jürgen Koppitz concludes “Our goal is to increase both the quantity and the quality of the output material and to ensure contaminant content doesn’t exceed 3%. We are confident that with the new Autosort machines in place and our continued close collaboration with Tomra Sorting Recycling, we will be able to achieve this target.”

ISRI Adopts Position on Paper Bag Recycling

Paper bags are a highly recyclable resource that is sought after for its fiber strength and is used in the manufacture of many products such as corrugated boxes, cereal boxes, wallboard, and new paper bags. Recycled paper bags are a valuable contributor to the U.S. trade balance, with a third of recovered paper exported. In support of paper bags as a recyclable and valuable resource, the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI) adopted the following.

It is the position of the ISRI that:

  • Promotes a free and fair, competitive, market-based system for the trade of recyclable materials such as paper bags.
  • Supports a competitive marketplace that does not restrict, direct, or interfere with the free flow of recyclable materials.
  • Opposes bans and fees on paper that are being manufactured into useful commodity grade materials and sold into viable, commercial markets without subsidies or noncompetitive, fixed pricing.
  • Promotes the proper recycling and economic opportunities associated with the collection, processing, and reuse in finished products such as paper bags.
  • Encourages the addition of paper bags to curbside collection programs.
  • Strongly supports the use of recycled content to the maximum percentage that is mechanically and commercially viable.

The position was developed in response to several high-profile municipalities either banning or placing fees on paper bags, which reduces the amount of paper bags recycled, thus negatively impacting the amount recovered. This position provides stakeholders, including governments, with valuable information on where ISRI stands on these issues.

New baler can make recycling cheaper

A single MP 270 MH baler can replace several smaller balers at a lower cost, says Presona. “In practice, we have put a turbocharger on a baler. I think we are the first in the world to do that,” says CEO Stefan Ekström. The new baler, which has the nickname “Mega”, is intended for recycling and sorting plants or other businesses that bale large quantities of material.

The basis to MP 270 MH’s high performance is parallel processes and self-optimization: When the material that is to be compacted falls into the baler, its density is automatically measured and then the baler optimizes itself and proceeds to pre-compress the material to 200 kg / m3. The pre-compressed material is then moved to the main press which creates finished bales while new material is being pre-compressed.

“Being able to pre-compress and make finished bales at the same time means that the capacity will be much higher compared to other types of balers on the market. The pre-compression can be compared to a turbocharger – by increasing the density of the added material we get much higher output, ie more bales per hour. This means that the cost per bale will be lower,” says Stefan Ekström.

Recognition as UN Global Compact LEAD Participant

UPM has had the LEAD participant status since 2016 and is the only forest industry representative and also the only Finnish company among the 41 LEAD participants. UN Global Compact is the world’s largest corporate sustainability initiative. UPM signed the initiative already in 2003.

“LEAD companies represent the highest level of engagement with the UN Global Compact. More than ever before, the world needs businesses of all sizes that continuously work to improve their sustainability performance and take action to build a better world,” says Sanda Ojiambo, CEO and Executive Director of the UN Global Compact.

“Responsibility is at the core of our Biofore strategy and we are committed to continuous improvement and replacing fossil materials. This year, we signed the UN’s 1.5 °C climate target and pursue to take science-based measures to limit global warming,” says Sami Lundgren, Vice President, Responsibility, UPM. “Our goal is to mitigate climate change and drive value creation through innovating novel products, committing to a 65% CO2 emission reduction and by practicing sustainable forestry,” he continues.
To be eligible for LEAD status, a company must be a participant in at least two Global Compact Action Platforms. Companies also need to demonstrate engagement with the initiative and commitment to defining and fostering leading practices in line with the UN Global Compact Ten Principles for responsible business and the Sustainable Development Goals. In addition, the companies are to report on their progress on implementing the Ten Principles on annual basis.
“We are privileged to be among other distinguished global sustainability leaders, and we are continuously striving to further improve our performance in all areas of corporate responsibility”, Sami Lundgren concludes.

Completely recyclable food packaging

The new packaging will reduce plastic usage for Austrian dairy producer SalzburgMilch by approximately 40 tonnes per year, compared to its previously used rigid plastic trays.

Mondi has launched its PerFORMing removable in partnership with SalzburgMilch for the brand SalzburgMilch Premium and the premium own-brand SPAR Natur*pur organic cheese slices. The shallow paper tray combines the recyclability of paper with the essential barrier properties of a thin plastic coating to keep food fresh and avoid waste.

Mondi released its original PerFORMing range in 2019 and has continued to work hard to make it even more sustainable. The original product could be recycled in Austrian paper recycling streams. The updated product now consists of paper and fully removable plastic which can easily be separated from the paper tray allowing for 100% paper recycling across Europe.

The product is made locally in Austria, meaning transportation is kept to a minimum and the overall carbon footprint is reduced. The base paper for the tray is Advantage Formable made predominantly from locally sourced wood and produced by Mondi Frantschach, while the trays are processed and coated by Mondi Zeltweg, both located in Austria.

Completely recyclable food packaging

The new packaging will reduce plastic usage for Austrian dairy producer SalzburgMilch by approximately 40 tonnes per year, compared to its previously used rigid plastic trays.

Mondi has launched its PerFORMing removable in partnership with SalzburgMilch for the brand SalzburgMilch Premium and the premium own-brand SPAR Natur*pur organic cheese slices. The shallow paper tray combines the recyclability of paper with the essential barrier properties of a thin plastic coating to keep food fresh and avoid waste.

Mondi released its original PerFORMing range in 2019 and has continued to work hard to make it even more sustainable. The original product could be recycled in Austrian paper recycling streams. The updated product now consists of paper and fully removable plastic which can easily be separated from the paper tray allowing for 100% paper recycling across Europe.

The product is made locally in Austria, meaning transportation is kept to a minimum and the overall carbon footprint is reduced. The base paper for the tray is Advantage Formable made predominantly from locally sourced wood and produced by Mondi Frantschach, while the trays are processed and coated by Mondi Zeltweg, both located in Austria.

Impact of COVID-19 on Waste Paper Recycling Industry

Local paper recyclers concentrate primarily on establishing adequate collection and segregation facilities to promote waste paper collection in the region. Leading recycling businesses are developing automatic and highly efficient recycling systems to reduce the price of production and eliminate work-intensive activities by automating the process already in place.

This study on the worldwide waste paper recycling market is driven by sector drivers, limitations, possibilities and threats. The research offers fresh entrants the chance to identify strategies for development employed by current players. Several developments will have an effect on the trajectory of development of worldwide waste paper recycling, along with focuses on regional subdivisions in the sector.

Around 57 million tons of paper are collected for recycling purposes in Europe. And each year, the collection rate continues to increase, exceeding 50%. In addition, recycled paper satisfies more than 50% of raw material requirements in Europe. The most important application of recycled paper is the newsprint followed by packaging products.

The authorities at Abingdon announced in January that only town residents would be offered curbside recycling. China and Hong Kong–formerly one of the largest plastics and paper waste markets–stopped taking almost every recycling agent at the start of 2018, including blended paper and blended plastic. But the only true alternative is for a fresh recycling company handling paper and plastics for several municipalities. The waste paper recycling industry is anticipated to be affected in the years ahead by such cases.

In partnership with Tetra Pak, Firefly Airlines has recycled its boxes of inflight drinks. Philip See, CEO, says it will progress in the near future slowly to more sustainable projects while only beginning with Used Beverage Cartons (UBCs). The recycled UBC will be transformed into fresh and helpful goods, including tiles for roofing, furnishings and recycled paper.

The development of the Global Waste Paper Recycling Market is driven by increased environmental concern. In addition, public rules have lowered the supply of raw material for the new paper manufacture and increased new paper prices. The development of the market has been driven.

In the worldwide waste paper recycling industry, Asia pacific is anticipated to emerge as a main area. More development and improved conduct in developing nations, such as India and China, have boosted the demand for products such as newsprint, packaging and printing papers in order to achieve greater literacy levels. The preferences of customers have also shifted toward convenient and viable packaging, regulations of governments on low plastic consumption, and low production costs are some other variables that drive market development.

More Information

Andritz receives repeat order for two shredders

The shredders will be used to process rejects from the paper mill as well as pre-shredded rags from the OCC pulping process. Start-up of the new equipment is scheduled for the second quarter of 2021.

The slow-rotating, single-shaft Aduro P shredders are equipped with a hydraulic pendulum pusher and an innovative cutting system that can produce small and medium particle sizes down to 50 mm. Together the two units are capable of handling large capacities and will process up to 15 tons of waste per hour. Thanks to their compact footprint and profile, the shredders can be installed and integrated into the facility very easily.

Palm is already operating an Andritz FRX 2000 shredder successfully in its paper mill at Wörth, and this repeat order further strengthens the successful long-term relationship between the two companies.

Palm is one of the leading manufacturers of newsprint and corrugated base paper made from 100% recovered fiber. The company runs five paper mills across Europe, with the mill in Wörth, Germany, being one of the most efficient in the world. The PM6 paper machine, which started up in 2002, has a capacity of 650,000 tons per year and is the world’s largest machine for production for corrugated base paper.

Recycling rate for paper increased to 72%

A great signal towards more sustainability is the fact that the collection of Paper for Recycling was maintained at high levels in Europe despite a decrease in paper and board consumption in Europe. The sharp and continued decline in Chinese demand for European Paper for Recycling was balanced by increased demand from other countries such as Turkey and India.  

Angelika Christ, EPRC chairwoman adds: “The increase to 72% shows that paper recycling is not only a promise, but is already today a model for circularity and a strong contributor to the European Green Deal”.