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Son Güncelleme: 28.11.2020 13:14
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Construction materials

New crawler excavator for demolition

Liebherr benefits from more than 50 years of experience in the development and production of demolition excavators. These demolition excavators set new standards in terms of efficiency and profitability of the machines. Thanks to the wide range of models and equipment, the optimal combination is available for every application. With the R 940 Demolition, Liebherr complements its existing range of demolition excavators R 950 and R 960.

The Liebherr engine, which complies with exhaust emissions standard Stage V, reaches an output of 200 kW, features a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), SCR system, particulate filter and does not have an EGR valve, thus ensuring lower fuel consumption and higher productivity. This machine is also available in a Tier 4 Final version, as well as for less regulated markets with a corresponding engine.

The Liebherr Demolition Control System, which received the Intermat Innovation Award, shows the driver the position of the demolition tool, thus guaranteeing the stability of the excavator. In this way, it was possible to reduce to a minimum the probability of an operating error that could impair the stability of the machine. With the active safety components of the LDC, the driver has real time information in his field of vision on the tilt angle of the machine and the tool position. If a critical value is exceeded, the LDC automatically triggers electronic range information. The safety system informs the driver about every movement of the equipment which could impact the stability of the excavator.

Equipment adapted to the application

Like the other representatives in the range, the R 940 Demolition also features optimal properties for selective deconstruction. Apart from the Liebherr Demolition Control System (LDC), a 30°-tiltable cab ensures an optimal view of the working area. The hydraulically adjustable undercarriage with variable track gauge facilitates transport and the counterweight can be removed.

A cab air filtration system for a healthy work environment and a spray system for reducing dust in the working area are available as optional equipment for the R 940 Demolition crawler excavator. The machine can also be equipped with an air compressor for cleaning the radiator and cab.

Local response to the European Green Deal

Ahead of the 9th European Conference on Sustainable Cities & Towns, local leaders from across Europe came together this week at the Mannheim 2020 Mayors’ Meeting to declare that cities must be engaged in the European Green Deal, and through the development of Local Green Deals. At the meeting, they launched the Mannheim Message, a call to involve local governments as real dialogue partners for policy development, not just implementation partners for policies that have been developed without them. The document will be formally presented to the European Commission on 1 October at the Mannheim2020 Conference.

The Mannheim Message welcomes the European Green Deal and its potential to become the new development model for Europe, its economy, society and environment, and highlights the critical role of local and regional governments in achieving sustainability goals, offering their solidarity, cooperation and support for building a strong, united, sustainable and inclusive Europe.

Five core systemic changes are proposed in the Mannheim Message: the transformation of current local infrastructure and systems; local development beyond growth and competition; cooperation, solidarity and inclusion; a lifestyle and culture of sufficiency and optimisation; and re-orientation towards the common good.

Based on these, Mayors and decision-makers of European cities and regions, promise to co-create and implement the European Green Deal together with national governments and the European Union (EU).

“The Mannheim Message addresses the systemic character of the transformation needed to achieve the goals of the EU Green Deal. It outlines a strong role for local and regional leaders to shape a just transition. Citizens are truly at the heart of the Mannheim Message – ensuring no one is left behind by taking into account the social consequences rapid change can ensue,” said Wolfgang Teubner, Regional Director Europe, ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability.

“The Green Deal needs to mainstream sustainability across all EU policies, ensuring that every piece of legislation can be delivered locally. The Mannheim Message reaffirms the commitment, political will and importance of the Green Deal by local and regional governments. If the Green Deal is not built and delivered with our cities and regions, it will not happen,” declared Apostolos Tzitzikostas, President of the European Committee of the Regions.

“The Mannheim Message is a clear statement that we are on the side of the European Union in order to achieve the goals of the Green Deal. The Mannheim Message is also a statement that we do not want to be only implementation partners for programmes, measures and regulations that have been agreed on without appropriate consultation with us. Therefore, we suggest a true collaboration to co-create Europe’s future for the well-being of our people today and in the future,” highlighted Dr. Peter Kurz, Mayor of Mannheim (Germany).

The Mannheim Message, which will be formally presented to the European Commission during the 9th European Conference on Sustainable Cities & Towns, at the Green Deal Plenary (October 1, 9:30 to 11:00 CEST), is now open for endorsement.

Conference on sustainable cities and towns

The 9th European Conference on Sustainable Cities & Towns – “Mannheim 2020”, taking place online from 30th September – 2nd October, will address the socio-economic and socio-cultural challenges associated with accelerating the transformation to sustainability and climate neutrality. Co-hosted by the city of Mannheim, Germany, the 2020 conference will take a decentralised and bottom-up perspective that begins by identifying cities and regions as key actors towards urban transformation processes. The conference will also call for increased ambition of European and global frameworks for sustainability and climate change, with a particular focus this year on the European Green Deal.

The three-day conference will provide a platform for local leaders to share their knowledge and interact with other stakeholders working on creating a better urban future in Europe. The interactive online platform allows for more connection and networking opportunities than ever.

How can Europe achieve an inclusive and just sustainability transition through the new European Green Deal? During the three-day conference, participants will learn about where Europe stands in the fight against climate change. They will hear from pioneering sustainable cities, and explore alternative economic models and discuss digitalisations ever-increasing role. The practical and actionable focus of the conference will result in the Mannheim Message, outlining next steps for European cities and towns on implementing the European Green Deal.

Plenary and Policy Panel sessions will explore topics from a broader level with engaging discussion among experts. Confirmed speakers include Prof. Dr. Dirk Messner, President of the German Environmental Agency; Lilyana Pavlova, Vice President of the European Investment Bank, and Anne Katrin Bohle, State Secretary of the Federal Ministry for the Interior, Building and Community (Germany). Some of the topics of these sessions include climate justice and resilience, the role of digitalisation for a sustainable future, the tension between economic systems, and the role of Climate Pacts as a tool in the sustainable transition process.

Conference attendees will have an opportunity for more hands-on learning through Solution and Toolbox sessions, where they will gain concrete tools to help face sustainability challenges in their cities. Among other topics, attendees can expect to learn about clean urban mobility; the development of policy for sustainable energy transition; socially responsible public procurement, and how to tackle plastic, construction and bio-waste from a circular perspective.

Inspiring contributions to the conference will come from speakers like Bernice Notenboom, Polar explorer, climate journalist and filmmaker, and Lamia Kamal-Chaoui, Director of the OECD Centre for Entrepreneurship, SMEs, Regions and Cities. City leaders like Peter Kurz, Mayor of Mannheim; Erion Veliaj, Mayor of Tirana; Thomas Kastrup-Larsen, Mayor of Aalborg, and Martin Horn, Mayor of Freiburg, will provide a localised perspective, by speaking about the sustainability transformations taking place in their cities.

The 9th European Conference on Sustainable Cities & Towns will build on the legacy of the previous conferences in Aalborg (Denmark, 1994 and 2004), Lisbon (Portugal, 1996), Hannover (Germany, 2000), Seville (Spain, 2007), Dunkerque (France, 2010), Geneva (Switzerland, 2013) and the Basque Country (Spain, 2016). Over 1,500 representatives from local and regional governments, European and international institutions, multilateral organisations, members of the research community, private sector and civil society are expected to take part in the event.

Circularity for urban communities

How might humanity broaden the concept of a circular urban economy to the concept of a circular urban society in the future in Europe? Cities currently consume 75 percent of all extracted natural resources, produce 50 percent of global waste, and emit between 60 and 80 percent of all greenhouse gases. The Hans Sauer Award 2021 is looking for innovative solutions to this urgent challenge in Europe.

Starting October 1st, 2020 the Hans Sauer Foundation welcomes proposals for this year’s competition: “Hans Sauer Award 2021 – Circular Cities – Designing Urban Communities of Tomorrow”.

The foundation is searching for new forms of cross-sector co-operation to transform the cities of today into the circular cities of tomorrow. This call addresses public authorities such as municipalities, citizens, businesses, civil society initiatives, academic institutions, start-ups, and non-profit organizations to take part in our competition.

The foundation welcomes everybody mentioned above to hand in their ideas, strategies, or best practice examples for circular city projects. The application requires at least two European partners or partner organizations. Registration ends January 31st, 2021. In March 2021, three of the finalists will win the Hans Sauer Award 2021. An expert jury will select the award winners and distribute the award money (€ 20.000,00 in total) among them.

Circular economy in construction

There is a lot of downcycling and even landfilling, but upcycling (RE-using) as it is is only up to 10%.This is due to a variety of reasons of which one is the available technology. Czech company ERC-TECH (Effective Recycling Concrete-Technology) wants to solve at least a part of the problem. The company has developed a technology to produce high-quality concrete from 100 per cent recycled aggregates and can replace 100 per cent of virgin material. The company calls their patented solution revolutionary – a term that is easily used, but maybe in this case not wrong.

Because as Petr Marek, Director of business development at ERC-TECH points out, there is nothing new in using recyclate in the production of concrete. But the company uses all of the inert material like concrete, bricks, roof tile or ceramics – which actually makes sorting at least of the inert materials unnessary. The result is a concrete with up to 45MPa compressive strength. All Classes of concretes are certified in accordance with the testing standards EN 206+A1, tested by right authorities. „It has all the parameters of concrete from virgin material“, Petr says. „It is circular economy in construction.“ And it gets even better: For the process, no new technology is needed. As Petr points out, that existing equipment like crushers for recycling etc. can be used as well. The „secret“ is the right mixing plant for the concrete.

„It’s all about quality of recycled aggegate and the mixing, we have the know-how, how to prepare and how to mix it“, Petr explains. He further states that all parameters are within the norms and some are even better. However, although this sounds like a good idea and can be done quite easily, there is one big issue with market implementation: the material is waste. That has of course legal implications, for example in terms of storage. But even the recycled product is considered still waste by many. Therefore, as Petr points out, trust is missing. „A change of the mindset is needed“, as he puts it. That is something he and his colleagues are working on right now. A good argument should be that the material in many cases is even better than virgin material. For the process, no natural resources are needed, which includes natural aggregates and sand. The concrete from recycling material even has some more advantages. The material is about 10 per cent lighter than concrete from natural aggregates – and as Petr explains, the production costs are lower as well. In many cases, this seems to be an important argument.

So in principal ERC-TECH is ready to conquer the world – sort of. The technology is already patented in 154 countries. What they need now are partners. They have few already in the Czech Republic, where 8 plants are already certificated. Also in Slovakia and one country in Middle East. One oft he company involved in Czech is Skanska CZ, where they use recycled concrete for own development projects and cooperation is also with BASF who produce special admixture for recycled aggregates. And now they are looking for partners in other countries to transfer the technological know-how. As Petr emphasises, ERC-TECH will not go into all the different countries themselves, they are looking for a strong partnerships where we will transfer technologicol know how to our partner. There is a very important reason, why local (country) players are needed: As Petr explains, parner knows very well market and also for implementation of technology on country level, the transport of concrete for more than 30 kilometers does not make much sense economically and ecologically.

Therefore, partners are needed. It would be useful getting in contact to those companies already in the recycling and concrete business, because they already have almost everything that is needed. And they can expect something in return. Depending on the usage, ERC-TECH talks about up to 45 per cent cost reduction. And of course, the environmental advantages are relevant as well.

The potential of the technology is huge, especially given the high amounts of C&D waste (whole world produce about 3,5 bilion tonnes every year). But above all, it needs customers willing to use the material. And the sad news is: Virgin material will still be needed. As Petr points out, even with using all demolition waste for the new process, only 15 per cent of virgin material could be replaced due to the high demand. But at least it is a start.

Learn more about the company and their products.

More circularity in buildings sector can cut GHG emissions

The EEA briefing, ‘Cutting greenhouse gas emissions through circular economy actions in the buildings sector’, says actions like reducing the use of concrete, cement and steel in the building sector can cut materials-related greenhouse gas emissions by 61% over a building’s life cycle stages until 2050.

The briefing is based on a study commissioned by the EEA, which looks at the role that specific actions towards a more circular economy can play in reducing emissions. The EEA assessment presents a new methodological approach which can help identify and prioritise circular efforts that can contribute to reducing emissions in any sector. It was developed by the EEA together with a consortium of European experts.

The study found that each of a building’s life cycle stages — from design, production and use to demolition and waste management — offers rich opportunity for greater circularity and emission reductions.

The background study prepared for the EEA cites that up to two thirds of global greenhouse gas emissions are related to flows of materials, and how we source, consume and dispose of them. This makes it an important area for further reductions. Circular economy actions can substantially contribute to reduce these emissions. Making buildings more circular over their life cycle means designing and using them more efficiently, making them last longer, as well as reusing and recycling building materials instead of sourcing new ones.

Steel, cement and concrete are some of the most emission-intensive materials used in constructing buildings. These can be cut down if the demand for such materials is reduced through smarter design and production as well as reusing and recycling these materials at the end of building’s life cycle. Other actions ranging from increasing occupancy rate to improved maintenance that extends a building’s lifetime also offer good potential to reduce emissions.

Making the building sector more ‘circular’ by reducing demand for such materials can help the European Union meet its climate neutrality and circular economy goals under the European Green Deal. This makes such actions ideal for inclusion in EU, national and local climate change plans and roadmaps, the briefing says.

The background study was carried out by a consortium of Ramboll consulting, Fraunhofer ISI and Ecologic Institute.

More circularity in buildings sector can cut GHG emissions

The EEA briefing, ‘Cutting greenhouse gas emissions through circular economy actions in the buildings sector’, says actions like reducing the use of concrete, cement and steel in the building sector can cut materials-related greenhouse gas emissions by 61% over a building’s life cycle stages until 2050.

The briefing is based on a study commissioned by the EEA, which looks at the role that specific actions towards a more circular economy can play in reducing emissions. The EEA assessment presents a new methodological approach which can help identify and prioritise circular efforts that can contribute to reducing emissions in any sector. It was developed by the EEA together with a consortium of European experts.

The study found that each of a building’s life cycle stages — from design, production and use to demolition and waste management — offers rich opportunity for greater circularity and emission reductions.

The background study prepared for the EEA cites that up to two thirds of global greenhouse gas emissions are related to flows of materials, and how we source, consume and dispose of them. This makes it an important area for further reductions. Circular economy actions can substantially contribute to reduce these emissions. Making buildings more circular over their life cycle means designing and using them more efficiently, making them last longer, as well as reusing and recycling building materials instead of sourcing new ones.

Steel, cement and concrete are some of the most emission-intensive materials used in constructing buildings. These can be cut down if the demand for such materials is reduced through smarter design and production as well as reusing and recycling these materials at the end of building’s life cycle. Other actions ranging from increasing occupancy rate to improved maintenance that extends a building’s lifetime also offer good potential to reduce emissions.

Making the building sector more ‘circular’ by reducing demand for such materials can help the European Union meet its climate neutrality and circular economy goals under the European Green Deal. This makes such actions ideal for inclusion in EU, national and local climate change plans and roadmaps, the briefing says.

The background study was carried out by a consortium of Ramboll consulting, Fraunhofer ISI and Ecologic Institute.

More circularity in buildings sector can cut GHG emissions

The EEA briefing, ‘Cutting greenhouse gas emissions through circular economy actions in the buildings sector’, says actions like reducing the use of concrete, cement and steel in the building sector can cut materials-related greenhouse gas emissions by 61% over a building’s life cycle stages until 2050.

The briefing is based on a study commissioned by the EEA, which looks at the role that specific actions towards a more circular economy can play in reducing emissions. The EEA assessment presents a new methodological approach which can help identify and prioritise circular efforts that can contribute to reducing emissions in any sector. It was developed by the EEA together with a consortium of European experts.

The study found that each of a building’s life cycle stages — from design, production and use to demolition and waste management — offers rich opportunity for greater circularity and emission reductions.

The background study prepared for the EEA cites that up to two thirds of global greenhouse gas emissions are related to flows of materials, and how we source, consume and dispose of them. This makes it an important area for further reductions. Circular economy actions can substantially contribute to reduce these emissions. Making buildings more circular over their life cycle means designing and using them more efficiently, making them last longer, as well as reusing and recycling building materials instead of sourcing new ones.

Steel, cement and concrete are some of the most emission-intensive materials used in constructing buildings. These can be cut down if the demand for such materials is reduced through smarter design and production as well as reusing and recycling these materials at the end of building’s life cycle. Other actions ranging from increasing occupancy rate to improved maintenance that extends a building’s lifetime also offer good potential to reduce emissions.

Making the building sector more ‘circular’ by reducing demand for such materials can help the European Union meet its climate neutrality and circular economy goals under the European Green Deal. This makes such actions ideal for inclusion in EU, national and local climate change plans and roadmaps, the briefing says.

The background study was carried out by a consortium of Ramboll consulting, Fraunhofer ISI and Ecologic Institute.

More circularity in buildings sector can cut GHG emissions

The EEA briefing, ‘Cutting greenhouse gas emissions through circular economy actions in the buildings sector’, says actions like reducing the use of concrete, cement and steel in the building sector can cut materials-related greenhouse gas emissions by 61% over a building’s life cycle stages until 2050.

The briefing is based on a study commissioned by the EEA, which looks at the role that specific actions towards a more circular economy can play in reducing emissions. The EEA assessment presents a new methodological approach which can help identify and prioritise circular efforts that can contribute to reducing emissions in any sector. It was developed by the EEA together with a consortium of European experts.

The study found that each of a building’s life cycle stages — from design, production and use to demolition and waste management — offers rich opportunity for greater circularity and emission reductions.

The background study prepared for the EEA cites that up to two thirds of global greenhouse gas emissions are related to flows of materials, and how we source, consume and dispose of them. This makes it an important area for further reductions. Circular economy actions can substantially contribute to reduce these emissions. Making buildings more circular over their life cycle means designing and using them more efficiently, making them last longer, as well as reusing and recycling building materials instead of sourcing new ones.

Steel, cement and concrete are some of the most emission-intensive materials used in constructing buildings. These can be cut down if the demand for such materials is reduced through smarter design and production as well as reusing and recycling these materials at the end of building’s life cycle. Other actions ranging from increasing occupancy rate to improved maintenance that extends a building’s lifetime also offer good potential to reduce emissions.

Making the building sector more ‘circular’ by reducing demand for such materials can help the European Union meet its climate neutrality and circular economy goals under the European Green Deal. This makes such actions ideal for inclusion in EU, national and local climate change plans and roadmaps, the briefing says.

The background study was carried out by a consortium of Ramboll consulting, Fraunhofer ISI and Ecologic Institute.

More circularity in buildings sector can cut GHG emissions

The EEA briefing, ‘Cutting greenhouse gas emissions through circular economy actions in the buildings sector’, says actions like reducing the use of concrete, cement and steel in the building sector can cut materials-related greenhouse gas emissions by 61% over a building’s life cycle stages until 2050.

The briefing is based on a study commissioned by the EEA, which looks at the role that specific actions towards a more circular economy can play in reducing emissions. The EEA assessment presents a new methodological approach which can help identify and prioritise circular efforts that can contribute to reducing emissions in any sector. It was developed by the EEA together with a consortium of European experts.

The study found that each of a building’s life cycle stages — from design, production and use to demolition and waste management — offers rich opportunity for greater circularity and emission reductions.

The background study prepared for the EEA cites that up to two thirds of global greenhouse gas emissions are related to flows of materials, and how we source, consume and dispose of them. This makes it an important area for further reductions. Circular economy actions can substantially contribute to reduce these emissions. Making buildings more circular over their life cycle means designing and using them more efficiently, making them last longer, as well as reusing and recycling building materials instead of sourcing new ones.

Steel, cement and concrete are some of the most emission-intensive materials used in constructing buildings. These can be cut down if the demand for such materials is reduced through smarter design and production as well as reusing and recycling these materials at the end of building’s life cycle. Other actions ranging from increasing occupancy rate to improved maintenance that extends a building’s lifetime also offer good potential to reduce emissions.

Making the building sector more ‘circular’ by reducing demand for such materials can help the European Union meet its climate neutrality and circular economy goals under the European Green Deal. This makes such actions ideal for inclusion in EU, national and local climate change plans and roadmaps, the briefing says.

The background study was carried out by a consortium of Ramboll consulting, Fraunhofer ISI and Ecologic Institute.