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Construction materials

Mine waste as sustainable aggregate

The unique multi-million pound venture sees GRS join forces with Tungsten West, operators of recently reopened Hemerdon tungsten-tin mine near Plympton, Devon, to sell high-quality secondary aggregate and transport it nationwide by sea and rail.

By-products arising from mining are widely rated as one of the most sustainable sources of construction aggregate and transportation by sea and rail produces a fraction of the carbon emissions of the equivalent road journeys.

Tungsten is the hardest metal with the highest melting point and has numerous uses in electronics, manufacturing and an array of everyday objects. Hemerdon mine is internationally important because it is the world’s fourth largest tungsten reserve (and the second largest to comply with CRIRSCO standards) as well as being Europe’s only source of tungsten.

But mining tungsten also gives rise to thousands of tonnes of granite, ideal for a full range of secondary aggregates from bulk fill materials to single sizes for concrete and many other construction applications. GRS will use its well-established freight network – in particular rail and marine – to efficiently transport the aggregate to construction projects across the south of England and potentially further afield. The granite aggregates will be processed on site at Hemerdon helping to sustain a number of local jobs.

Starting this month (September 2021) GRS expects to ramp-up secondary aggregate volumes from Hemerdon to distribute more than a million tonnes each year for the next decade and beyond. After a short lorry journey from Hemerdon, the aggregate will be loaded onto ships at Plymouth for transportation to other ports around Britain. The aggregate will also be hauled a short distance by road to nearby Marsh Mills (between Plymouth and Plympton) where it can be loaded onto trains for onward distribution via the rail network.

Through its Cornish subsidiary Maen Karne and London-based business Walsh, the GRS Group already successfully transports secondary granite from the Cornish china clay industry into London by sea and rail. By volume aggregates represent the single biggest flow of materials in the UK economy.

Mine waste as sustainable aggregate

The unique multi-million pound venture sees GRS join forces with Tungsten West, operators of recently reopened Hemerdon tungsten-tin mine near Plympton, Devon, to sell high-quality secondary aggregate and transport it nationwide by sea and rail.

By-products arising from mining are widely rated as one of the most sustainable sources of construction aggregate and transportation by sea and rail produces a fraction of the carbon emissions of the equivalent road journeys.

Tungsten is the hardest metal with the highest melting point and has numerous uses in electronics, manufacturing and an array of everyday objects. Hemerdon mine is internationally important because it is the world’s fourth largest tungsten reserve (and the second largest to comply with CRIRSCO standards) as well as being Europe’s only source of tungsten.

But mining tungsten also gives rise to thousands of tonnes of granite, ideal for a full range of secondary aggregates from bulk fill materials to single sizes for concrete and many other construction applications. GRS will use its well-established freight network – in particular rail and marine – to efficiently transport the aggregate to construction projects across the south of England and potentially further afield. The granite aggregates will be processed on site at Hemerdon helping to sustain a number of local jobs.

Starting this month (September 2021) GRS expects to ramp-up secondary aggregate volumes from Hemerdon to distribute more than a million tonnes each year for the next decade and beyond. After a short lorry journey from Hemerdon, the aggregate will be loaded onto ships at Plymouth for transportation to other ports around Britain. The aggregate will also be hauled a short distance by road to nearby Marsh Mills (between Plymouth and Plympton) where it can be loaded onto trains for onward distribution via the rail network.

Through its Cornish subsidiary Maen Karne and London-based business Walsh, the GRS Group already successfully transports secondary granite from the Cornish china clay industry into London by sea and rail. By volume aggregates represent the single biggest flow of materials in the UK economy.

Mine waste as sustainable aggregate

The unique multi-million pound venture sees GRS join forces with Tungsten West, operators of recently reopened Hemerdon tungsten-tin mine near Plympton, Devon, to sell high-quality secondary aggregate and transport it nationwide by sea and rail.

By-products arising from mining are widely rated as one of the most sustainable sources of construction aggregate and transportation by sea and rail produces a fraction of the carbon emissions of the equivalent road journeys.

Tungsten is the hardest metal with the highest melting point and has numerous uses in electronics, manufacturing and an array of everyday objects. Hemerdon mine is internationally important because it is the world’s fourth largest tungsten reserve (and the second largest to comply with CRIRSCO standards) as well as being Europe’s only source of tungsten.

But mining tungsten also gives rise to thousands of tonnes of granite, ideal for a full range of secondary aggregates from bulk fill materials to single sizes for concrete and many other construction applications. GRS will use its well-established freight network – in particular rail and marine – to efficiently transport the aggregate to construction projects across the south of England and potentially further afield. The granite aggregates will be processed on site at Hemerdon helping to sustain a number of local jobs.

Starting this month (September 2021) GRS expects to ramp-up secondary aggregate volumes from Hemerdon to distribute more than a million tonnes each year for the next decade and beyond. After a short lorry journey from Hemerdon, the aggregate will be loaded onto ships at Plymouth for transportation to other ports around Britain. The aggregate will also be hauled a short distance by road to nearby Marsh Mills (between Plymouth and Plympton) where it can be loaded onto trains for onward distribution via the rail network.

Through its Cornish subsidiary Maen Karne and London-based business Walsh, the GRS Group already successfully transports secondary granite from the Cornish china clay industry into London by sea and rail. By volume aggregates represent the single biggest flow of materials in the UK economy.

Mine waste as sustainable aggregate

The unique multi-million pound venture sees GRS join forces with Tungsten West, operators of recently reopened Hemerdon tungsten-tin mine near Plympton, Devon, to sell high-quality secondary aggregate and transport it nationwide by sea and rail.

By-products arising from mining are widely rated as one of the most sustainable sources of construction aggregate and transportation by sea and rail produces a fraction of the carbon emissions of the equivalent road journeys.

Tungsten is the hardest metal with the highest melting point and has numerous uses in electronics, manufacturing and an array of everyday objects. Hemerdon mine is internationally important because it is the world’s fourth largest tungsten reserve (and the second largest to comply with CRIRSCO standards) as well as being Europe’s only source of tungsten.

But mining tungsten also gives rise to thousands of tonnes of granite, ideal for a full range of secondary aggregates from bulk fill materials to single sizes for concrete and many other construction applications. GRS will use its well-established freight network – in particular rail and marine – to efficiently transport the aggregate to construction projects across the south of England and potentially further afield. The granite aggregates will be processed on site at Hemerdon helping to sustain a number of local jobs.

Starting this month (September 2021) GRS expects to ramp-up secondary aggregate volumes from Hemerdon to distribute more than a million tonnes each year for the next decade and beyond. After a short lorry journey from Hemerdon, the aggregate will be loaded onto ships at Plymouth for transportation to other ports around Britain. The aggregate will also be hauled a short distance by road to nearby Marsh Mills (between Plymouth and Plympton) where it can be loaded onto trains for onward distribution via the rail network.

Through its Cornish subsidiary Maen Karne and London-based business Walsh, the GRS Group already successfully transports secondary granite from the Cornish china clay industry into London by sea and rail. By volume aggregates represent the single biggest flow of materials in the UK economy.

Mine waste as sustainable aggregate

The unique multi-million pound venture sees GRS join forces with Tungsten West, operators of recently reopened Hemerdon tungsten-tin mine near Plympton, Devon, to sell high-quality secondary aggregate and transport it nationwide by sea and rail.

By-products arising from mining are widely rated as one of the most sustainable sources of construction aggregate and transportation by sea and rail produces a fraction of the carbon emissions of the equivalent road journeys.

Tungsten is the hardest metal with the highest melting point and has numerous uses in electronics, manufacturing and an array of everyday objects. Hemerdon mine is internationally important because it is the world’s fourth largest tungsten reserve (and the second largest to comply with CRIRSCO standards) as well as being Europe’s only source of tungsten.

But mining tungsten also gives rise to thousands of tonnes of granite, ideal for a full range of secondary aggregates from bulk fill materials to single sizes for concrete and many other construction applications. GRS will use its well-established freight network – in particular rail and marine – to efficiently transport the aggregate to construction projects across the south of England and potentially further afield. The granite aggregates will be processed on site at Hemerdon helping to sustain a number of local jobs.

Starting this month (September 2021) GRS expects to ramp-up secondary aggregate volumes from Hemerdon to distribute more than a million tonnes each year for the next decade and beyond. After a short lorry journey from Hemerdon, the aggregate will be loaded onto ships at Plymouth for transportation to other ports around Britain. The aggregate will also be hauled a short distance by road to nearby Marsh Mills (between Plymouth and Plympton) where it can be loaded onto trains for onward distribution via the rail network.

Through its Cornish subsidiary Maen Karne and London-based business Walsh, the GRS Group already successfully transports secondary granite from the Cornish china clay industry into London by sea and rail. By volume aggregates represent the single biggest flow of materials in the UK economy.

The use of recycled materials in bridge construction

Sustainability often comes hand in hand with one key idea: recycling. The use of previously used materials in construction is increasingly becoming more prominent within the industry. Sustainability must include recycled materials and green solutions in construction. Here we focus on how recycled materials can be and are being used in bridge construction, and how this reflects the industry as a whole.

Sustainable bubbles

When discussing using recycled materials, we must consider how sustainable these options are. Reusing materials is environmentally friendly but may not always be viable. Sustainability has three key factors involved: social, environmental, and economic.

Recycled construction is considered as a viable solution to many of these problems. For example, the use of plastic in recycled bridge construction has many benefits, including reduced maintenance needs and cost. This is thanks to the material’s resistance to UV radiation, rot, and decay, and their stability in saltwater.

However, while it is inevitable that raw material and manpower must be used to create most bridges, finding an effective balance of sustainability is essential. Man-Chung Tang, a sustainable bridge engineers, stresses that “balance” remains the core focus of recycled construction. Tang emphasises this point with a worded equation―balance is equal to supply minus demand. In this summary, Tang insists that balance must be a positive number to achieve sustainability. These factors will vary depending on contextual inputs, including location, size, and the type of bridge.

The challenges of building recycled bridges

Cost

One of the main deterrents to the construction of recycled bridges is cost. Currently, the demand for recycled engineering materials is not high enough to establish a market where the volume of materials produced and competition can reduce prices to a viable level.
However, costs can be saved on maintenance, where plastic alternative is less likely to rot than metal or wooden constructions. This is particularly true for constructions that use recycled plastic that is reinforced with structural steelwork – while initially expensive, it presents lower costs in the long run.

Mechanics

The mechanical properties of recycled plastic offer less versatility than other raw materials. This is because plastic is moulded during the recycling process, consequently decreasing fibre length and its strength.

For this reason, the use of recycled materials on bridges is limited. Materials with more structural integrity may have to be used, especially in heavy weight-supporting bridges. As Tang said, balance must be found to create sustainable constructions. As of yet, commercially viable bridges made from 100 per cent recycled materials may seem unlikely, but efforts to include as much recycled material as possible should be a priority going forward.

Size

The mechanical properties of recycled plastics limit the opportunities to create larger bridges. In most recycled bridges, it is common to see low heights and small spans, meaning that the break between supporting pillars is greatly reduced. Again, the strength of plastic is the key issue.

The world’s longest recycled bridge is Dawyck Estate river crossing, over the River Tweed in Scotland. It is only 30 metres long but can support up to 44 tons.

According to researchers, the strength of recycled plastics is increasing with further innovation. Even more, when recognising that the materials on the bridge were made from used plastic bottles and other household public waste, the benefits of using these materials becomes clear.

When we review the need for recycled materials in the construction industry, it’s important to remember the key factors in sustainability and how they are reflected in the challenges of using green materials. The social, environmental, and economic value of sustainability must be acknowledged with the cost, mechanics, and size of the bridge. Innovation is key to the success of future sustainable construction, with material strength being a major priority for those researching the topic. However, the most important aspect to consider is education. How will future generations tackle the problem of sustainability? How can we educate people to understand the benefits of sustainable engineering over the ease of raw construction?

Carbonmastic recycled tyre asphalt trialed in Australia

The asphalt, known as Carbonmastic, developed by Gold Coast companies Austek Asphalt Production and Pearl Global, could potentially lead to millions of tyres each year being redirected from landfill.

The trial began this week on roads at Ormeau on the northern Gold Coast and Austek General manager David Simmons said the trial was the first time a council had committed to using the environmentally innovative asphalt.

“We essentially fully recycle used tyres and repurpose the products to replace diesel fuel at our plant and concurrently use the recovered carbon black to make a superior asphalt product,” Simmons said.

“This product is great for council roads because it restricts reflective cracking, you can lay it thinner because it’s a stronger compound, and it’s a smoother, quieter surface,” he said.

“Obviously there’s environmental benefits. There’s also cost savings, there’s benefits to council roads, and it’s got real safety advantages.

“This is absolutely ground-breaking stuff. It’s very clever. We are getting really good buy-in and a lot of councils are now looking at this really seriously.”

Gold Coast Mayor Tom Tate said the locally-produced waste-tyre busting technology could be a boon to the city.

“Our city is broadening its economy which is attracting new innovation and new industry,” Mayor Tate said.

“To see this type of technology is fantastic as it brings with it the idea of renewing waste products.

“Recycling is at the forefront of community planning across Australia so I look forward to seeing how this new asphalt application rolls out – literally.’’

Around the world, an estimated 1.5 billion tyres are dumped each year, causing major environmental challenges including the non-biodegradable tyres leaching toxins into soil and water.

A staggering 56 million used tyres – equating to about 450,000 tonnes – are estimated to be sitting in disposal sites throughout Australia.

About 14 percent of the waste tyres are currently recycled into other forms, 56 percent is exported and 30 percent dumped illegally, stockpiled and ends up choking landfills mostly owned and operated by local councils.

Simmons said the process fully recycled 100 percent of the tyre, creating a full circular lifecycle sustainable economy.

Tyres, from cars to massive mining vehicles, were broken down to produce carbon char, reusable steel and fuel oil.

Tyre-derived fuel is a global growth market with the fuel increasingly being adapted as an alternative to diesel.

The carbon char also developed in the process is core to the Carbonmastic asphalt product.

It is a major evolution on other recycled tyre products, such as crumbed rubber, because it utilises 10 used tyres compared to just 0.7 of a high-grade truck tyre for every tonne produced and is activated carbon that improves bitumen strength and colour.

“There’s nothing like it in the industry at all. About 0.7 of a truck tyre is the closest thing that crumbed rubber delivers,” Simmons said.

“Nothing gets wasted. It’s incredible really.”

Simmons said more than 1.6 million tyres would be recycled into Austek’s production processes annually, ensuring the tyres would be diverted from toxic stockpiles or landfills.

The Austek Production plant at Yatala would replace 1.3 million to 1.6 million litres of diesel with tyre-derived fuel oil.

“It reduces our carbon footprint massively,” Simmons said.

“We’ve got big numbers on this. Our plant produces roughly 160,000 tonnes a year. We’re going to save about 7,000 tonnes of CO2 going into the atmosphere.”

Simmons said other Queensland councils including Moreton Bay, Logan, Dalby and Redlands had expressed interest in the product that was being trialled on the Gold Coast.

The council applications came after 180 tonnes of Carbonmastic was laid on Norwell Motorplex’s kilometre V8 Supercar racetrack between Brisbane and the Gold Coast to test and showcase the product’s improved skid resistance, reduced road noise, and other safety features under motor racing conditions.

Carbonmastic recycled tyre asphalt trialed in Australia

The asphalt, known as Carbonmastic, developed by Gold Coast companies Austek Asphalt Production and Pearl Global, could potentially lead to millions of tyres each year being redirected from landfill.

The trial began this week on roads at Ormeau on the northern Gold Coast and Austek General manager David Simmons said the trial was the first time a council had committed to using the environmentally innovative asphalt.

“We essentially fully recycle used tyres and repurpose the products to replace diesel fuel at our plant and concurrently use the recovered carbon black to make a superior asphalt product,” Simmons said.

“This product is great for council roads because it restricts reflective cracking, you can lay it thinner because it’s a stronger compound, and it’s a smoother, quieter surface,” he said.

“Obviously there’s environmental benefits. There’s also cost savings, there’s benefits to council roads, and it’s got real safety advantages.

“This is absolutely ground-breaking stuff. It’s very clever. We are getting really good buy-in and a lot of councils are now looking at this really seriously.”

Gold Coast Mayor Tom Tate said the locally-produced waste-tyre busting technology could be a boon to the city.

“Our city is broadening its economy which is attracting new innovation and new industry,” Mayor Tate said.

“To see this type of technology is fantastic as it brings with it the idea of renewing waste products.

“Recycling is at the forefront of community planning across Australia so I look forward to seeing how this new asphalt application rolls out – literally.’’

Around the world, an estimated 1.5 billion tyres are dumped each year, causing major environmental challenges including the non-biodegradable tyres leaching toxins into soil and water.

A staggering 56 million used tyres – equating to about 450,000 tonnes – are estimated to be sitting in disposal sites throughout Australia.

About 14 percent of the waste tyres are currently recycled into other forms, 56 percent is exported and 30 percent dumped illegally, stockpiled and ends up choking landfills mostly owned and operated by local councils.

Simmons said the process fully recycled 100 percent of the tyre, creating a full circular lifecycle sustainable economy.

Tyres, from cars to massive mining vehicles, were broken down to produce carbon char, reusable steel and fuel oil.

Tyre-derived fuel is a global growth market with the fuel increasingly being adapted as an alternative to diesel.

The carbon char also developed in the process is core to the Carbonmastic asphalt product.

It is a major evolution on other recycled tyre products, such as crumbed rubber, because it utilises 10 used tyres compared to just 0.7 of a high-grade truck tyre for every tonne produced and is activated carbon that improves bitumen strength and colour.

“There’s nothing like it in the industry at all. About 0.7 of a truck tyre is the closest thing that crumbed rubber delivers,” Simmons said.

“Nothing gets wasted. It’s incredible really.”

Simmons said more than 1.6 million tyres would be recycled into Austek’s production processes annually, ensuring the tyres would be diverted from toxic stockpiles or landfills.

The Austek Production plant at Yatala would replace 1.3 million to 1.6 million litres of diesel with tyre-derived fuel oil.

“It reduces our carbon footprint massively,” Simmons said.

“We’ve got big numbers on this. Our plant produces roughly 160,000 tonnes a year. We’re going to save about 7,000 tonnes of CO2 going into the atmosphere.”

Simmons said other Queensland councils including Moreton Bay, Logan, Dalby and Redlands had expressed interest in the product that was being trialled on the Gold Coast.

The council applications came after 180 tonnes of Carbonmastic was laid on Norwell Motorplex’s kilometre V8 Supercar racetrack between Brisbane and the Gold Coast to test and showcase the product’s improved skid resistance, reduced road noise, and other safety features under motor racing conditions.

Carbonmastic recycled tyre asphalt trialed in Australia

The asphalt, known as Carbonmastic, developed by Gold Coast companies Austek Asphalt Production and Pearl Global, could potentially lead to millions of tyres each year being redirected from landfill.

The trial began this week on roads at Ormeau on the northern Gold Coast and Austek General manager David Simmons said the trial was the first time a council had committed to using the environmentally innovative asphalt.

“We essentially fully recycle used tyres and repurpose the products to replace diesel fuel at our plant and concurrently use the recovered carbon black to make a superior asphalt product,” Simmons said.

“This product is great for council roads because it restricts reflective cracking, you can lay it thinner because it’s a stronger compound, and it’s a smoother, quieter surface,” he said.

“Obviously there’s environmental benefits. There’s also cost savings, there’s benefits to council roads, and it’s got real safety advantages.

“This is absolutely ground-breaking stuff. It’s very clever. We are getting really good buy-in and a lot of councils are now looking at this really seriously.”

Gold Coast Mayor Tom Tate said the locally-produced waste-tyre busting technology could be a boon to the city.

“Our city is broadening its economy which is attracting new innovation and new industry,” Mayor Tate said.

“To see this type of technology is fantastic as it brings with it the idea of renewing waste products.

“Recycling is at the forefront of community planning across Australia so I look forward to seeing how this new asphalt application rolls out – literally.’’

Around the world, an estimated 1.5 billion tyres are dumped each year, causing major environmental challenges including the non-biodegradable tyres leaching toxins into soil and water.

A staggering 56 million used tyres – equating to about 450,000 tonnes – are estimated to be sitting in disposal sites throughout Australia.

About 14 percent of the waste tyres are currently recycled into other forms, 56 percent is exported and 30 percent dumped illegally, stockpiled and ends up choking landfills mostly owned and operated by local councils.

Simmons said the process fully recycled 100 percent of the tyre, creating a full circular lifecycle sustainable economy.

Tyres, from cars to massive mining vehicles, were broken down to produce carbon char, reusable steel and fuel oil.

Tyre-derived fuel is a global growth market with the fuel increasingly being adapted as an alternative to diesel.

The carbon char also developed in the process is core to the Carbonmastic asphalt product.

It is a major evolution on other recycled tyre products, such as crumbed rubber, because it utilises 10 used tyres compared to just 0.7 of a high-grade truck tyre for every tonne produced and is activated carbon that improves bitumen strength and colour.

“There’s nothing like it in the industry at all. About 0.7 of a truck tyre is the closest thing that crumbed rubber delivers,” Simmons said.

“Nothing gets wasted. It’s incredible really.”

Simmons said more than 1.6 million tyres would be recycled into Austek’s production processes annually, ensuring the tyres would be diverted from toxic stockpiles or landfills.

The Austek Production plant at Yatala would replace 1.3 million to 1.6 million litres of diesel with tyre-derived fuel oil.

“It reduces our carbon footprint massively,” Simmons said.

“We’ve got big numbers on this. Our plant produces roughly 160,000 tonnes a year. We’re going to save about 7,000 tonnes of CO2 going into the atmosphere.”

Simmons said other Queensland councils including Moreton Bay, Logan, Dalby and Redlands had expressed interest in the product that was being trialled on the Gold Coast.

The council applications came after 180 tonnes of Carbonmastic was laid on Norwell Motorplex’s kilometre V8 Supercar racetrack between Brisbane and the Gold Coast to test and showcase the product’s improved skid resistance, reduced road noise, and other safety features under motor racing conditions.

Carbonmastic recycled tyre asphalt trialed in Australia

The asphalt, known as Carbonmastic, developed by Gold Coast companies Austek Asphalt Production and Pearl Global, could potentially lead to millions of tyres each year being redirected from landfill.

The trial began this week on roads at Ormeau on the northern Gold Coast and Austek General manager David Simmons said the trial was the first time a council had committed to using the environmentally innovative asphalt.

“We essentially fully recycle used tyres and repurpose the products to replace diesel fuel at our plant and concurrently use the recovered carbon black to make a superior asphalt product,” Simmons said.

“This product is great for council roads because it restricts reflective cracking, you can lay it thinner because it’s a stronger compound, and it’s a smoother, quieter surface,” he said.

“Obviously there’s environmental benefits. There’s also cost savings, there’s benefits to council roads, and it’s got real safety advantages.

“This is absolutely ground-breaking stuff. It’s very clever. We are getting really good buy-in and a lot of councils are now looking at this really seriously.”

Gold Coast Mayor Tom Tate said the locally-produced waste-tyre busting technology could be a boon to the city.

“Our city is broadening its economy which is attracting new innovation and new industry,” Mayor Tate said.

“To see this type of technology is fantastic as it brings with it the idea of renewing waste products.

“Recycling is at the forefront of community planning across Australia so I look forward to seeing how this new asphalt application rolls out – literally.’’

Around the world, an estimated 1.5 billion tyres are dumped each year, causing major environmental challenges including the non-biodegradable tyres leaching toxins into soil and water.

A staggering 56 million used tyres – equating to about 450,000 tonnes – are estimated to be sitting in disposal sites throughout Australia.

About 14 percent of the waste tyres are currently recycled into other forms, 56 percent is exported and 30 percent dumped illegally, stockpiled and ends up choking landfills mostly owned and operated by local councils.

Simmons said the process fully recycled 100 percent of the tyre, creating a full circular lifecycle sustainable economy.

Tyres, from cars to massive mining vehicles, were broken down to produce carbon char, reusable steel and fuel oil.

Tyre-derived fuel is a global growth market with the fuel increasingly being adapted as an alternative to diesel.

The carbon char also developed in the process is core to the Carbonmastic asphalt product.

It is a major evolution on other recycled tyre products, such as crumbed rubber, because it utilises 10 used tyres compared to just 0.7 of a high-grade truck tyre for every tonne produced and is activated carbon that improves bitumen strength and colour.

“There’s nothing like it in the industry at all. About 0.7 of a truck tyre is the closest thing that crumbed rubber delivers,” Simmons said.

“Nothing gets wasted. It’s incredible really.”

Simmons said more than 1.6 million tyres would be recycled into Austek’s production processes annually, ensuring the tyres would be diverted from toxic stockpiles or landfills.

The Austek Production plant at Yatala would replace 1.3 million to 1.6 million litres of diesel with tyre-derived fuel oil.

“It reduces our carbon footprint massively,” Simmons said.

“We’ve got big numbers on this. Our plant produces roughly 160,000 tonnes a year. We’re going to save about 7,000 tonnes of CO2 going into the atmosphere.”

Simmons said other Queensland councils including Moreton Bay, Logan, Dalby and Redlands had expressed interest in the product that was being trialled on the Gold Coast.

The council applications came after 180 tonnes of Carbonmastic was laid on Norwell Motorplex’s kilometre V8 Supercar racetrack between Brisbane and the Gold Coast to test and showcase the product’s improved skid resistance, reduced road noise, and other safety features under motor racing conditions.