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Construction materials

Carbonmastic recycled tyre asphalt trialed in Australia

The asphalt, known as Carbonmastic, developed by Gold Coast companies Austek Asphalt Production and Pearl Global, could potentially lead to millions of tyres each year being redirected from landfill.

The trial began this week on roads at Ormeau on the northern Gold Coast and Austek General manager David Simmons said the trial was the first time a council had committed to using the environmentally innovative asphalt.

“We essentially fully recycle used tyres and repurpose the products to replace diesel fuel at our plant and concurrently use the recovered carbon black to make a superior asphalt product,” Simmons said.

“This product is great for council roads because it restricts reflective cracking, you can lay it thinner because it’s a stronger compound, and it’s a smoother, quieter surface,” he said.

“Obviously there’s environmental benefits. There’s also cost savings, there’s benefits to council roads, and it’s got real safety advantages.

“This is absolutely ground-breaking stuff. It’s very clever. We are getting really good buy-in and a lot of councils are now looking at this really seriously.”

Gold Coast Mayor Tom Tate said the locally-produced waste-tyre busting technology could be a boon to the city.

“Our city is broadening its economy which is attracting new innovation and new industry,” Mayor Tate said.

“To see this type of technology is fantastic as it brings with it the idea of renewing waste products.

“Recycling is at the forefront of community planning across Australia so I look forward to seeing how this new asphalt application rolls out – literally.’’

Around the world, an estimated 1.5 billion tyres are dumped each year, causing major environmental challenges including the non-biodegradable tyres leaching toxins into soil and water.

A staggering 56 million used tyres – equating to about 450,000 tonnes – are estimated to be sitting in disposal sites throughout Australia.

About 14 percent of the waste tyres are currently recycled into other forms, 56 percent is exported and 30 percent dumped illegally, stockpiled and ends up choking landfills mostly owned and operated by local councils.

Simmons said the process fully recycled 100 percent of the tyre, creating a full circular lifecycle sustainable economy.

Tyres, from cars to massive mining vehicles, were broken down to produce carbon char, reusable steel and fuel oil.

Tyre-derived fuel is a global growth market with the fuel increasingly being adapted as an alternative to diesel.

The carbon char also developed in the process is core to the Carbonmastic asphalt product.

It is a major evolution on other recycled tyre products, such as crumbed rubber, because it utilises 10 used tyres compared to just 0.7 of a high-grade truck tyre for every tonne produced and is activated carbon that improves bitumen strength and colour.

“There’s nothing like it in the industry at all. About 0.7 of a truck tyre is the closest thing that crumbed rubber delivers,” Simmons said.

“Nothing gets wasted. It’s incredible really.”

Simmons said more than 1.6 million tyres would be recycled into Austek’s production processes annually, ensuring the tyres would be diverted from toxic stockpiles or landfills.

The Austek Production plant at Yatala would replace 1.3 million to 1.6 million litres of diesel with tyre-derived fuel oil.

“It reduces our carbon footprint massively,” Simmons said.

“We’ve got big numbers on this. Our plant produces roughly 160,000 tonnes a year. We’re going to save about 7,000 tonnes of CO2 going into the atmosphere.”

Simmons said other Queensland councils including Moreton Bay, Logan, Dalby and Redlands had expressed interest in the product that was being trialled on the Gold Coast.

The council applications came after 180 tonnes of Carbonmastic was laid on Norwell Motorplex’s kilometre V8 Supercar racetrack between Brisbane and the Gold Coast to test and showcase the product’s improved skid resistance, reduced road noise, and other safety features under motor racing conditions.

Carbonmastic recycled tyre asphalt trialed in Australia

The asphalt, known as Carbonmastic, developed by Gold Coast companies Austek Asphalt Production and Pearl Global, could potentially lead to millions of tyres each year being redirected from landfill.

The trial began this week on roads at Ormeau on the northern Gold Coast and Austek General manager David Simmons said the trial was the first time a council had committed to using the environmentally innovative asphalt.

“We essentially fully recycle used tyres and repurpose the products to replace diesel fuel at our plant and concurrently use the recovered carbon black to make a superior asphalt product,” Simmons said.

“This product is great for council roads because it restricts reflective cracking, you can lay it thinner because it’s a stronger compound, and it’s a smoother, quieter surface,” he said.

“Obviously there’s environmental benefits. There’s also cost savings, there’s benefits to council roads, and it’s got real safety advantages.

“This is absolutely ground-breaking stuff. It’s very clever. We are getting really good buy-in and a lot of councils are now looking at this really seriously.”

Gold Coast Mayor Tom Tate said the locally-produced waste-tyre busting technology could be a boon to the city.

“Our city is broadening its economy which is attracting new innovation and new industry,” Mayor Tate said.

“To see this type of technology is fantastic as it brings with it the idea of renewing waste products.

“Recycling is at the forefront of community planning across Australia so I look forward to seeing how this new asphalt application rolls out – literally.’’

Around the world, an estimated 1.5 billion tyres are dumped each year, causing major environmental challenges including the non-biodegradable tyres leaching toxins into soil and water.

A staggering 56 million used tyres – equating to about 450,000 tonnes – are estimated to be sitting in disposal sites throughout Australia.

About 14 percent of the waste tyres are currently recycled into other forms, 56 percent is exported and 30 percent dumped illegally, stockpiled and ends up choking landfills mostly owned and operated by local councils.

Simmons said the process fully recycled 100 percent of the tyre, creating a full circular lifecycle sustainable economy.

Tyres, from cars to massive mining vehicles, were broken down to produce carbon char, reusable steel and fuel oil.

Tyre-derived fuel is a global growth market with the fuel increasingly being adapted as an alternative to diesel.

The carbon char also developed in the process is core to the Carbonmastic asphalt product.

It is a major evolution on other recycled tyre products, such as crumbed rubber, because it utilises 10 used tyres compared to just 0.7 of a high-grade truck tyre for every tonne produced and is activated carbon that improves bitumen strength and colour.

“There’s nothing like it in the industry at all. About 0.7 of a truck tyre is the closest thing that crumbed rubber delivers,” Simmons said.

“Nothing gets wasted. It’s incredible really.”

Simmons said more than 1.6 million tyres would be recycled into Austek’s production processes annually, ensuring the tyres would be diverted from toxic stockpiles or landfills.

The Austek Production plant at Yatala would replace 1.3 million to 1.6 million litres of diesel with tyre-derived fuel oil.

“It reduces our carbon footprint massively,” Simmons said.

“We’ve got big numbers on this. Our plant produces roughly 160,000 tonnes a year. We’re going to save about 7,000 tonnes of CO2 going into the atmosphere.”

Simmons said other Queensland councils including Moreton Bay, Logan, Dalby and Redlands had expressed interest in the product that was being trialled on the Gold Coast.

The council applications came after 180 tonnes of Carbonmastic was laid on Norwell Motorplex’s kilometre V8 Supercar racetrack between Brisbane and the Gold Coast to test and showcase the product’s improved skid resistance, reduced road noise, and other safety features under motor racing conditions.

Carbonmastic recycled tyre asphalt trialed in Australia

The asphalt, known as Carbonmastic, developed by Gold Coast companies Austek Asphalt Production and Pearl Global, could potentially lead to millions of tyres each year being redirected from landfill.

The trial began this week on roads at Ormeau on the northern Gold Coast and Austek General manager David Simmons said the trial was the first time a council had committed to using the environmentally innovative asphalt.

“We essentially fully recycle used tyres and repurpose the products to replace diesel fuel at our plant and concurrently use the recovered carbon black to make a superior asphalt product,” Simmons said.

“This product is great for council roads because it restricts reflective cracking, you can lay it thinner because it’s a stronger compound, and it’s a smoother, quieter surface,” he said.

“Obviously there’s environmental benefits. There’s also cost savings, there’s benefits to council roads, and it’s got real safety advantages.

“This is absolutely ground-breaking stuff. It’s very clever. We are getting really good buy-in and a lot of councils are now looking at this really seriously.”

Gold Coast Mayor Tom Tate said the locally-produced waste-tyre busting technology could be a boon to the city.

“Our city is broadening its economy which is attracting new innovation and new industry,” Mayor Tate said.

“To see this type of technology is fantastic as it brings with it the idea of renewing waste products.

“Recycling is at the forefront of community planning across Australia so I look forward to seeing how this new asphalt application rolls out – literally.’’

Around the world, an estimated 1.5 billion tyres are dumped each year, causing major environmental challenges including the non-biodegradable tyres leaching toxins into soil and water.

A staggering 56 million used tyres – equating to about 450,000 tonnes – are estimated to be sitting in disposal sites throughout Australia.

About 14 percent of the waste tyres are currently recycled into other forms, 56 percent is exported and 30 percent dumped illegally, stockpiled and ends up choking landfills mostly owned and operated by local councils.

Simmons said the process fully recycled 100 percent of the tyre, creating a full circular lifecycle sustainable economy.

Tyres, from cars to massive mining vehicles, were broken down to produce carbon char, reusable steel and fuel oil.

Tyre-derived fuel is a global growth market with the fuel increasingly being adapted as an alternative to diesel.

The carbon char also developed in the process is core to the Carbonmastic asphalt product.

It is a major evolution on other recycled tyre products, such as crumbed rubber, because it utilises 10 used tyres compared to just 0.7 of a high-grade truck tyre for every tonne produced and is activated carbon that improves bitumen strength and colour.

“There’s nothing like it in the industry at all. About 0.7 of a truck tyre is the closest thing that crumbed rubber delivers,” Simmons said.

“Nothing gets wasted. It’s incredible really.”

Simmons said more than 1.6 million tyres would be recycled into Austek’s production processes annually, ensuring the tyres would be diverted from toxic stockpiles or landfills.

The Austek Production plant at Yatala would replace 1.3 million to 1.6 million litres of diesel with tyre-derived fuel oil.

“It reduces our carbon footprint massively,” Simmons said.

“We’ve got big numbers on this. Our plant produces roughly 160,000 tonnes a year. We’re going to save about 7,000 tonnes of CO2 going into the atmosphere.”

Simmons said other Queensland councils including Moreton Bay, Logan, Dalby and Redlands had expressed interest in the product that was being trialled on the Gold Coast.

The council applications came after 180 tonnes of Carbonmastic was laid on Norwell Motorplex’s kilometre V8 Supercar racetrack between Brisbane and the Gold Coast to test and showcase the product’s improved skid resistance, reduced road noise, and other safety features under motor racing conditions.

Carbonmastic recycled tyre asphalt trialed in Australia

The asphalt, known as Carbonmastic, developed by Gold Coast companies Austek Asphalt Production and Pearl Global, could potentially lead to millions of tyres each year being redirected from landfill.

The trial began this week on roads at Ormeau on the northern Gold Coast and Austek General manager David Simmons said the trial was the first time a council had committed to using the environmentally innovative asphalt.

“We essentially fully recycle used tyres and repurpose the products to replace diesel fuel at our plant and concurrently use the recovered carbon black to make a superior asphalt product,” Simmons said.

“This product is great for council roads because it restricts reflective cracking, you can lay it thinner because it’s a stronger compound, and it’s a smoother, quieter surface,” he said.

“Obviously there’s environmental benefits. There’s also cost savings, there’s benefits to council roads, and it’s got real safety advantages.

“This is absolutely ground-breaking stuff. It’s very clever. We are getting really good buy-in and a lot of councils are now looking at this really seriously.”

Gold Coast Mayor Tom Tate said the locally-produced waste-tyre busting technology could be a boon to the city.

“Our city is broadening its economy which is attracting new innovation and new industry,” Mayor Tate said.

“To see this type of technology is fantastic as it brings with it the idea of renewing waste products.

“Recycling is at the forefront of community planning across Australia so I look forward to seeing how this new asphalt application rolls out – literally.’’

Around the world, an estimated 1.5 billion tyres are dumped each year, causing major environmental challenges including the non-biodegradable tyres leaching toxins into soil and water.

A staggering 56 million used tyres – equating to about 450,000 tonnes – are estimated to be sitting in disposal sites throughout Australia.

About 14 percent of the waste tyres are currently recycled into other forms, 56 percent is exported and 30 percent dumped illegally, stockpiled and ends up choking landfills mostly owned and operated by local councils.

Simmons said the process fully recycled 100 percent of the tyre, creating a full circular lifecycle sustainable economy.

Tyres, from cars to massive mining vehicles, were broken down to produce carbon char, reusable steel and fuel oil.

Tyre-derived fuel is a global growth market with the fuel increasingly being adapted as an alternative to diesel.

The carbon char also developed in the process is core to the Carbonmastic asphalt product.

It is a major evolution on other recycled tyre products, such as crumbed rubber, because it utilises 10 used tyres compared to just 0.7 of a high-grade truck tyre for every tonne produced and is activated carbon that improves bitumen strength and colour.

“There’s nothing like it in the industry at all. About 0.7 of a truck tyre is the closest thing that crumbed rubber delivers,” Simmons said.

“Nothing gets wasted. It’s incredible really.”

Simmons said more than 1.6 million tyres would be recycled into Austek’s production processes annually, ensuring the tyres would be diverted from toxic stockpiles or landfills.

The Austek Production plant at Yatala would replace 1.3 million to 1.6 million litres of diesel with tyre-derived fuel oil.

“It reduces our carbon footprint massively,” Simmons said.

“We’ve got big numbers on this. Our plant produces roughly 160,000 tonnes a year. We’re going to save about 7,000 tonnes of CO2 going into the atmosphere.”

Simmons said other Queensland councils including Moreton Bay, Logan, Dalby and Redlands had expressed interest in the product that was being trialled on the Gold Coast.

The council applications came after 180 tonnes of Carbonmastic was laid on Norwell Motorplex’s kilometre V8 Supercar racetrack between Brisbane and the Gold Coast to test and showcase the product’s improved skid resistance, reduced road noise, and other safety features under motor racing conditions.

Why recycled asphalt is now being highly preferred by road construction engineers

They are also used in concocting asphalt silts and gravels for roofing. Furthermore, it turns down the depletion of natural resources, for example coal and water. Shingles and milled tire rubber are able to be integrated into asphalt. This, in turn, curtails the use of virgin material, thereby proving to be an exceptionally commendable eco-friendly choice.

According to several surveys done in the past few years, around ten million tons of grits and shingles are thrown out every year with nearly one and a half million tons be reprocessed into asphalt. Shingle waste is engendered from either builder waste or strip from roofs.

RAP can simply be defined as an old asphalt that has been tactically crushed or pulverized into shingles and grits together once it’s compressed again. Asphalt is not precisely an eco-friendly choice, and thus, it’s archetypally reprocessed to diminish asphalt waste. This practice has worked as a major factor making asphalt one of the most reused aggregate resources across the world. Taking recourse to recycled asphalt product is regarded as a green choice.

For enterprises who reuse on a constant pace can anticipate large savings. With the use of recycled asphalt product on board, considerably less reclaimed asphalt is landing up in landfills. With the advancement of technology, the percentage of asphalt that can be reprocessed has also augmented, which can further bring down any negative environmental impact asphalt fabrication and its usage might bring about. In the last few years, a big number of projects have started introducing amplified amounts of RAP, and this new drift paves the way for less waste, minimized cost, and a greater quality result.

There are many reasons why one should consider recycled asphalt product in their next project including budget, the environment, and feasibility. With a number of asphalt-paved highways in the United States, the opportunity subsists to construct eco-friendly, viable projects that are also beneficial for the American economy. Asphalt is the most reused product in the States, with around ninety percent of all reclaimed asphalt being reprocessed. But, now the question remains, ‘why’? This post is going to revel some definite advantages of recycled asphalt.

The recycled form or type is just as excellent as the original. This is one case where reprocessing is not likely to mislay the quality. There are even notions around that recycled asphalt products are, at time, of superior quality than that of the original ones, as they are more tough and resilient. At the same time, recycled asphalt products come up as a renewable option as well- something that traditional asphalt cannot lay claim to.

It’s a cost-efficient choice indeed. As per the studies conducted by The National Asphalt Paving Association, the taxpayers in the United States happen to save around two billion per annum exclusively from recycling asphalt. Simultaneously, reprocessed asphalt is also a low-cost material to yield and procure, often taken recourse to minimize the overall construction costs. Costs are also noticeably truncated when compared to that of traditional asphalt as many procedures, such as the quarrying of materials, are wiped out.

Asphalt tends to escalate the usage of other compostables. Resources from other manufacturing units are cast off into asphalt supplies instead of wrapping up in landfills. In a nutshell, everything from crystal, and asphalt roofing grits does find a place in new asphalt. The constructions engineers get huge benefits from these add-ons too, since additional material convoys a new trait to the mixture.

Coming to the environmental aspect, amplified use of recycled asphalt pavements as a proportion of the total asphalt blend can considerably bring down greenhouse gas excretions by reducing the significant fuel depletion needed to obtain and process raw materials for virgin blend. Pebbles, shingles, and stones, the combinations of asphalt are a limited resource. Safeguarding these resources through reprocessing is actually necessary in terms of keeping the road conditions upto the mark.

Considering the unparalleled advantages of recycled asphalt, government enterprises, pavement contractors, and engineers have started cogitating about old tarmac as an asset, not left-over or waste. Accordingly, the drift of reprocessing and recycling takes up gaining momentum. So, there’s practically no doubt that both the construction engineers and the consumers tend to be benefitted with asphalt recycling, while the environment doesn’t stay out of the ambit too.

Last but not the least, another significant benefit of switching to recycling asphalt is it also diminishes the excavating, withdrawal, and oil depletion required to produce new asphalt. This, in turn, also saws down on obligatory resources and substances some of which are already in short supply in certain parts of the USA.

According to Allied Market Research, the global recycled asphalt market is expected to grow at a significant CAGR from 2020 to 2027. Several environmental as well as economic advantages associated with recycled asphalt have augmented the market growth in more than one way. The fact that this compound is fabricated through reprocessing the existing plane by granulating and maceration has made its widespread usage possible in lanes, passages, fills, potholes, and utility cut. Application of recycled asphalt is becoming highly prevalent for refurbishment of streets, boulevards, roadways, and even in roof grits. On the other hand, certain limitations in use of the compound is expected to restrain the market growth to some degree. Nonetheless, high-end development in custom solutions and programming has almost subdued the impeding factor and created a plethora of opportunities for the key players in the industry.

Here, it’s worth mentioning that the spate of covid-19 pandemic impacted the global recycled asphalt market negatively, especially during the first phase of the lockdown, since there was a huge fall in demand from the construction sector for the material. However, the situation is being ameliorated at a gradual pace and market is quite likely to get back to its previous stance very soon.

Why recycled asphalt is now being highly preferred by road construction engineers

They are also used in concocting asphalt silts and gravels for roofing. Furthermore, it turns down the depletion of natural resources, for example coal and water. Shingles and milled tire rubber are able to be integrated into asphalt. This, in turn, curtails the use of virgin material, thereby proving to be an exceptionally commendable eco-friendly choice.

According to several surveys done in the past few years, around ten million tons of grits and shingles are thrown out every year with nearly one and a half million tons be reprocessed into asphalt. Shingle waste is engendered from either builder waste or strip from roofs.

RAP can simply be defined as an old asphalt that has been tactically crushed or pulverized into shingles and grits together once it’s compressed again. Asphalt is not precisely an eco-friendly choice, and thus, it’s archetypally reprocessed to diminish asphalt waste. This practice has worked as a major factor making asphalt one of the most reused aggregate resources across the world. Taking recourse to recycled asphalt product is regarded as a green choice.

For enterprises who reuse on a constant pace can anticipate large savings. With the use of recycled asphalt product on board, considerably less reclaimed asphalt is landing up in landfills. With the advancement of technology, the percentage of asphalt that can be reprocessed has also augmented, which can further bring down any negative environmental impact asphalt fabrication and its usage might bring about. In the last few years, a big number of projects have started introducing amplified amounts of RAP, and this new drift paves the way for less waste, minimized cost, and a greater quality result.

There are many reasons why one should consider recycled asphalt product in their next project including budget, the environment, and feasibility. With a number of asphalt-paved highways in the United States, the opportunity subsists to construct eco-friendly, viable projects that are also beneficial for the American economy. Asphalt is the most reused product in the States, with around ninety percent of all reclaimed asphalt being reprocessed. But, now the question remains, ‘why’? This post is going to revel some definite advantages of recycled asphalt.

The recycled form or type is just as excellent as the original. This is one case where reprocessing is not likely to mislay the quality. There are even notions around that recycled asphalt products are, at time, of superior quality than that of the original ones, as they are more tough and resilient. At the same time, recycled asphalt products come up as a renewable option as well- something that traditional asphalt cannot lay claim to.

It’s a cost-efficient choice indeed. As per the studies conducted by The National Asphalt Paving Association, the taxpayers in the United States happen to save around two billion per annum exclusively from recycling asphalt. Simultaneously, reprocessed asphalt is also a low-cost material to yield and procure, often taken recourse to minimize the overall construction costs. Costs are also noticeably truncated when compared to that of traditional asphalt as many procedures, such as the quarrying of materials, are wiped out.

Asphalt tends to escalate the usage of other compostables. Resources from other manufacturing units are cast off into asphalt supplies instead of wrapping up in landfills. In a nutshell, everything from crystal, and asphalt roofing grits does find a place in new asphalt. The constructions engineers get huge benefits from these add-ons too, since additional material convoys a new trait to the mixture.

Coming to the environmental aspect, amplified use of recycled asphalt pavements as a proportion of the total asphalt blend can considerably bring down greenhouse gas excretions by reducing the significant fuel depletion needed to obtain and process raw materials for virgin blend. Pebbles, shingles, and stones, the combinations of asphalt are a limited resource. Safeguarding these resources through reprocessing is actually necessary in terms of keeping the road conditions upto the mark.

Considering the unparalleled advantages of recycled asphalt, government enterprises, pavement contractors, and engineers have started cogitating about old tarmac as an asset, not left-over or waste. Accordingly, the drift of reprocessing and recycling takes up gaining momentum. So, there’s practically no doubt that both the construction engineers and the consumers tend to be benefitted with asphalt recycling, while the environment doesn’t stay out of the ambit too.

Last but not the least, another significant benefit of switching to recycling asphalt is it also diminishes the excavating, withdrawal, and oil depletion required to produce new asphalt. This, in turn, also saws down on obligatory resources and substances some of which are already in short supply in certain parts of the USA.

According to Allied Market Research, the global recycled asphalt market is expected to grow at a significant CAGR from 2020 to 2027. Several environmental as well as economic advantages associated with recycled asphalt have augmented the market growth in more than one way. The fact that this compound is fabricated through reprocessing the existing plane by granulating and maceration has made its widespread usage possible in lanes, passages, fills, potholes, and utility cut. Application of recycled asphalt is becoming highly prevalent for refurbishment of streets, boulevards, roadways, and even in roof grits. On the other hand, certain limitations in use of the compound is expected to restrain the market growth to some degree. Nonetheless, high-end development in custom solutions and programming has almost subdued the impeding factor and created a plethora of opportunities for the key players in the industry.

Here, it’s worth mentioning that the spate of covid-19 pandemic impacted the global recycled asphalt market negatively, especially during the first phase of the lockdown, since there was a huge fall in demand from the construction sector for the material. However, the situation is being ameliorated at a gradual pace and market is quite likely to get back to its previous stance very soon.

New crawler excavator for demolition

Liebherr benefits from more than 50 years of experience in the development and production of demolition excavators. These demolition excavators set new standards in terms of efficiency and profitability of the machines. Thanks to the wide range of models and equipment, the optimal combination is available for every application. With the R 940 Demolition, Liebherr complements its existing range of demolition excavators R 950 and R 960.

The Liebherr engine, which complies with exhaust emissions standard Stage V, reaches an output of 200 kW, features a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), SCR system, particulate filter and does not have an EGR valve, thus ensuring lower fuel consumption and higher productivity. This machine is also available in a Tier 4 Final version, as well as for less regulated markets with a corresponding engine.

The Liebherr Demolition Control System, which received the Intermat Innovation Award, shows the driver the position of the demolition tool, thus guaranteeing the stability of the excavator. In this way, it was possible to reduce to a minimum the probability of an operating error that could impair the stability of the machine. With the active safety components of the LDC, the driver has real time information in his field of vision on the tilt angle of the machine and the tool position. If a critical value is exceeded, the LDC automatically triggers electronic range information. The safety system informs the driver about every movement of the equipment which could impact the stability of the excavator.

Equipment adapted to the application

Like the other representatives in the range, the R 940 Demolition also features optimal properties for selective deconstruction. Apart from the Liebherr Demolition Control System (LDC), a 30°-tiltable cab ensures an optimal view of the working area. The hydraulically adjustable undercarriage with variable track gauge facilitates transport and the counterweight can be removed.

A cab air filtration system for a healthy work environment and a spray system for reducing dust in the working area are available as optional equipment for the R 940 Demolition crawler excavator. The machine can also be equipped with an air compressor for cleaning the radiator and cab.

Local response to the European Green Deal

Ahead of the 9th European Conference on Sustainable Cities & Towns, local leaders from across Europe came together this week at the Mannheim 2020 Mayors’ Meeting to declare that cities must be engaged in the European Green Deal, and through the development of Local Green Deals. At the meeting, they launched the Mannheim Message, a call to involve local governments as real dialogue partners for policy development, not just implementation partners for policies that have been developed without them. The document will be formally presented to the European Commission on 1 October at the Mannheim2020 Conference.

The Mannheim Message welcomes the European Green Deal and its potential to become the new development model for Europe, its economy, society and environment, and highlights the critical role of local and regional governments in achieving sustainability goals, offering their solidarity, cooperation and support for building a strong, united, sustainable and inclusive Europe.

Five core systemic changes are proposed in the Mannheim Message: the transformation of current local infrastructure and systems; local development beyond growth and competition; cooperation, solidarity and inclusion; a lifestyle and culture of sufficiency and optimisation; and re-orientation towards the common good.

Based on these, Mayors and decision-makers of European cities and regions, promise to co-create and implement the European Green Deal together with national governments and the European Union (EU).

“The Mannheim Message addresses the systemic character of the transformation needed to achieve the goals of the EU Green Deal. It outlines a strong role for local and regional leaders to shape a just transition. Citizens are truly at the heart of the Mannheim Message – ensuring no one is left behind by taking into account the social consequences rapid change can ensue,” said Wolfgang Teubner, Regional Director Europe, ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability.

“The Green Deal needs to mainstream sustainability across all EU policies, ensuring that every piece of legislation can be delivered locally. The Mannheim Message reaffirms the commitment, political will and importance of the Green Deal by local and regional governments. If the Green Deal is not built and delivered with our cities and regions, it will not happen,” declared Apostolos Tzitzikostas, President of the European Committee of the Regions.

“The Mannheim Message is a clear statement that we are on the side of the European Union in order to achieve the goals of the Green Deal. The Mannheim Message is also a statement that we do not want to be only implementation partners for programmes, measures and regulations that have been agreed on without appropriate consultation with us. Therefore, we suggest a true collaboration to co-create Europe’s future for the well-being of our people today and in the future,” highlighted Dr. Peter Kurz, Mayor of Mannheim (Germany).

The Mannheim Message, which will be formally presented to the European Commission during the 9th European Conference on Sustainable Cities & Towns, at the Green Deal Plenary (October 1, 9:30 to 11:00 CEST), is now open for endorsement.

Conference on sustainable cities and towns

The 9th European Conference on Sustainable Cities & Towns – “Mannheim 2020”, taking place online from 30th September – 2nd October, will address the socio-economic and socio-cultural challenges associated with accelerating the transformation to sustainability and climate neutrality. Co-hosted by the city of Mannheim, Germany, the 2020 conference will take a decentralised and bottom-up perspective that begins by identifying cities and regions as key actors towards urban transformation processes. The conference will also call for increased ambition of European and global frameworks for sustainability and climate change, with a particular focus this year on the European Green Deal.

The three-day conference will provide a platform for local leaders to share their knowledge and interact with other stakeholders working on creating a better urban future in Europe. The interactive online platform allows for more connection and networking opportunities than ever.

How can Europe achieve an inclusive and just sustainability transition through the new European Green Deal? During the three-day conference, participants will learn about where Europe stands in the fight against climate change. They will hear from pioneering sustainable cities, and explore alternative economic models and discuss digitalisations ever-increasing role. The practical and actionable focus of the conference will result in the Mannheim Message, outlining next steps for European cities and towns on implementing the European Green Deal.

Plenary and Policy Panel sessions will explore topics from a broader level with engaging discussion among experts. Confirmed speakers include Prof. Dr. Dirk Messner, President of the German Environmental Agency; Lilyana Pavlova, Vice President of the European Investment Bank, and Anne Katrin Bohle, State Secretary of the Federal Ministry for the Interior, Building and Community (Germany). Some of the topics of these sessions include climate justice and resilience, the role of digitalisation for a sustainable future, the tension between economic systems, and the role of Climate Pacts as a tool in the sustainable transition process.

Conference attendees will have an opportunity for more hands-on learning through Solution and Toolbox sessions, where they will gain concrete tools to help face sustainability challenges in their cities. Among other topics, attendees can expect to learn about clean urban mobility; the development of policy for sustainable energy transition; socially responsible public procurement, and how to tackle plastic, construction and bio-waste from a circular perspective.

Inspiring contributions to the conference will come from speakers like Bernice Notenboom, Polar explorer, climate journalist and filmmaker, and Lamia Kamal-Chaoui, Director of the OECD Centre for Entrepreneurship, SMEs, Regions and Cities. City leaders like Peter Kurz, Mayor of Mannheim; Erion Veliaj, Mayor of Tirana; Thomas Kastrup-Larsen, Mayor of Aalborg, and Martin Horn, Mayor of Freiburg, will provide a localised perspective, by speaking about the sustainability transformations taking place in their cities.

The 9th European Conference on Sustainable Cities & Towns will build on the legacy of the previous conferences in Aalborg (Denmark, 1994 and 2004), Lisbon (Portugal, 1996), Hannover (Germany, 2000), Seville (Spain, 2007), Dunkerque (France, 2010), Geneva (Switzerland, 2013) and the Basque Country (Spain, 2016). Over 1,500 representatives from local and regional governments, European and international institutions, multilateral organisations, members of the research community, private sector and civil society are expected to take part in the event.

Circularity for urban communities

How might humanity broaden the concept of a circular urban economy to the concept of a circular urban society in the future in Europe? Cities currently consume 75 percent of all extracted natural resources, produce 50 percent of global waste, and emit between 60 and 80 percent of all greenhouse gases. The Hans Sauer Award 2021 is looking for innovative solutions to this urgent challenge in Europe.

Starting October 1st, 2020 the Hans Sauer Foundation welcomes proposals for this year’s competition: “Hans Sauer Award 2021 – Circular Cities – Designing Urban Communities of Tomorrow”.

The foundation is searching for new forms of cross-sector co-operation to transform the cities of today into the circular cities of tomorrow. This call addresses public authorities such as municipalities, citizens, businesses, civil society initiatives, academic institutions, start-ups, and non-profit organizations to take part in our competition.

The foundation welcomes everybody mentioned above to hand in their ideas, strategies, or best practice examples for circular city projects. The application requires at least two European partners or partner organizations. Registration ends January 31st, 2021. In March 2021, three of the finalists will win the Hans Sauer Award 2021. An expert jury will select the award winners and distribute the award money (€ 20.000,00 in total) among them.