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Son Güncelleme: 10.04.2021 22:53
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Cihangir Türkkani

Bodrum ticaret hayatımızda plastik doğrama, alüminyum doğrama, ferforge,cam sistemler ile siz değerli müşterilerimize Arda Alüminyum olarak hizmet vermekteyiz. Bodrum, Türkiye http://www. ardaaluminyum.com Öncelikle sizlere ulaşmaktan duyduğum mutluluğu belirtmek isterim. Arda Aluminyum olarak biz inşaat sektöründe plastik doğrama, aluminyum doğrama, ferforge ve prefabrik yapı üretiminde ihtiyac duyulan temel yapı elemanlarının üretim ve tedariği konusunda hizmet vermekteyim. Alanınında uzman ekibim ve yönetim kadromla, kusursuz müşteri memnuniyetini ve titiz üretim anlayışını ilke edindim. Bu bğlamda siz değerli müşterilerime en iyi ve en kaliteli ürünü uygun fiyat seçenekleriyle sunuyorum. Adres: Konacık Büyük Sanayi Sitesi No: 14 ( TUV Karşısı) Bodrum Muğla Türkiye Telefon Ve Fax: +902523630087 Whatsup: +905323827314 Cep Telefonu: +905323827314 E Posta: ardayapibodrum@gmail.com cengiz@ardaaluminyum.com cihangir@ardaaluminyum.com Çalışma Saatleri: 08.00-19.00 Çalışma Günleri: Pazartesi Salı Çarşamba Persembe Cuma Cumatresi

Andritz signs cooperation agreement with Linetechnology

The modular processing plants with flexible configurations are sold under the name of Blueline and enable decentralized recycling and economical processing of small quantities of residual industrial waste fractions.

Andritz will provide the required shredding technology and supply equipment from the ADuro product series for universal and fine shredding. The ADuro shredders will be tuned to the special requirements of the Blueline modules and can be used in different areas of applications, for example the treatment of plastic, substitute fuels, wood or cables. Their biggest advantages are the flexibility of the shredder modules for single-stage shredding and the high-performance, fine classification system with an integrated separation stage.

Linetechnology is headquartered in Waidhofen an der Ybbs, Austria, and was founded in 2019 as an independent affiliate of IFE Aufbereitungstechnik GmbH. The company develops, produces and sells modular, container-based processing plants under the product name BLUELINE. These plants can be reconfigured dynamically and cover virtually all established process steps in dry mechanical-physical processing of residual materials.

New polystyrene design for recycling guideline published by RecyClass

Any company wishing to verify the recyclability of its PS packaging can now consult the guidelines or use the free online RecyClass tool which incorporates the RecyClass Design for Recycling Guidelines.

“As polystyrene packaging is not widely recycled in the EU yet, development of this new guideline is pivotal in getting recycling of polystyrene-based packaging off the ground”, said David Eslava, RecyClass PS Technical Committee Chairman & Deputy Director at Eslava Plasticos, he continued: It is a very necessary step to give a clear direction to the industry”.
Each element of packaging plays a crucial role in ensuring its recyclability at the end of its use phase. That is where Design for Recycling Guidelines come into play as they offer a coherent insight into how different components must be manufactured to be compatible with recycling to, eventually, be recycled back into high-end applications.

PS Coloured Containers Guideline was elaborated by the experts from across the value chain represented in the respective RecyClass Technical Committee. By reporting on the behaviour of packaging in a PS containers’ recycling stream the guideline enables to determine whether a package will be assigned full, low, or no compatibility. Different components of a PS packaging such as closure systems, lids, labels, or additives, are in the scope of the document. The first and foremost requirement is that the density of packaging that must be between 1 and 1,07 g/cm³. The guideline does not cover, however, the expanded polystyrene (EPS) nor extruded polystyrene (XPS).

The document adds to the existing guidelines covering polyethylene, polypropylene, polyethylene terephthalate, comprising all kinds of packaging whether flexible or rigid, including films, bottles, tubes as well as pouches, pots, and trays.

The RecyClass PS Technical Committee works equally on the PS Recyclability Protocol which will allow for scientific testing innovative technologies and packaging to continuously update the guideline which is a living document. Such an approach allows the industry to be innovative while at the same time ensuring recyclability.
With this guideline, RecyClass aims at accelerating the high-quality recycling of post-consumer styrenics packaging in Europe.

The management of plastics and the “actions” of the Attica prefecture

Sustainability has become perhaps the most critical issue facing the plastics industry and is reaching an unprecedented level of global – public, corporate and governmental – awareness and concern. From a value chain perspective, plastics producers, processors, brand owners and the financial community all have an interest in playing an active role.

Giorgos Patoulis, Regional Governon of Attica

The plastics and chemical industries are under increasing public scrutiny due to the accumulated plastic waste in the ocean from their uncontrolled release into rivers and oceans, especially in Southeast Asia. Various scientific reports of microplastics entering the biological food chain raise further concerns for the public. The impact of uncontrolled plastic waste management after initial use is eroding the public image of chemicals and may even cause “social authorization”.

Simply put, the future of the plastics industry and its “social license” is based on how stakeholders respond.

The challenges are huge as the full development of the three critical corners of the plastic recycling triangle – collection / sorting, processing, and end-use application – remains in early development. Today, many collection systems are under financial pressure and flooded with waste volumes of all materials (glass, plastic, paper).

European Targets 2030

Sustainability goals, when set, are often without a fundamental understanding of the potential of existing infrastructure. For example, Europe, which is considered to be the most sustainable-advanced region on the planet, should substantially double its infrastructure capacity by adding around 300 recycling facilities and 300 for sorting, requiring around € 1.5 billion a year by 2026 for funding to achieve the goals it has set.

In particular, the strategy set by the European Union stipulates that all plastic packaging available on the EU market will either be reusable or can be recycled in a cost-effective manner. The main goal of the vision, however, predicts that by 2030 at least 55% of plastic waste produced in Europe will be recycled.

Greece Today

According to a recent study by IOBE, Greece ranks last among EU28 countries in terms of solid waste management as most solid waste is disposed of in landfills while reuse and recycling are extremely limited. Greece came second from the end in solid waste recycling in the European ranking for 2020.

Consequently, the Greek economy relies almost exclusively on prime, and in many cases imported, raw materials, resulting in a low ranking of cyclical indices, resulting in the loss of significant opportunities for the creation of domestic added value and employment

Finland – Plastics Recycling Example

In 2019 Neste Oil, the world’s leading provider of renewable diesel, renewable jet fuel, and an expert in delivering drop-in renewable chemical solutions, and Remondis, one of the world’s largest privately owned recycling, service and water companies, have signed an agreement to collaborate in the development of chemical recycling of plastic waste.

This collaboration will assist the Helsinki prefecture in achieving EU’s 2030 recycling targets. The goal of this partnership is to achieve the recycling / conversion of one million metric tons of plastics per year into chemical naphtha (which will be used to produce plastics) in the company’s refineries by 2030.

Attica Prefecture – Greece – Actions to Achieve the Recycling Objectives of the European Directives

The effort to transition to a form of circular economy is already at the heart of the strategic planning of the Attica prefecture. The region is already planning and implementing interventions so that plastic waste is converted into resources that can be utilized by the domestic plastics industry while maintaining and strengthening both its competitiveness and its contribution to the Greek economy. The main points of the roadmap set by the Attica prefecture for the strengthening of recycling in general and the transition to a circular economy are:

  • Application of separate collection of waste streams per material
  • Enhance remunerative recycling and establish a guarantee return system on bottles (plastic and glass)
  • Intensification of information campaigns
  • Strengthening waste collection and treatment infrastructure
  • Application of circular economy criteria in public procurement
  • Strengthening of electronic systems and control mechanisms
  • Incentives and sanctions in municipalities
  • Studies and application of chemical recycling technologies of plastics and other innovative solutions

The strategic planning for circular economy and the management of plastic waste of the Attica prefecture will be the central pillar that will be followed by all other regions of Greece.

Fishing industry by-products and municipal solid waste are transformed into bioplastics

AIMPLAS, the Plastics Technology Centre, is the coordinator of the European DAFIA Project, whose aim has been to recover municipal solid waste and marine rest raw materials from the fishing industry in order to obtain new, high value-added products and additives. The results have included flame retardants that provide an alternative to halogenated models, sustainable barrier packaging and edible coatings that extend the shelf life of food, and chemical substances that can be used to produce new plastics from renewable resources.

The fifteen partners in the project consortium have worked for the last four years on waste that appears to have no added value, including municipal solid waste (household rubbish) and the by-products of the fishing industry. Fishing industry waste was used to extract and formulate flame-retardant additives at pilot plant scale. These additives can be used in the automotive industry to increase the flame retardancy of polyamides with components that provide an alternative to halogenated flame retardants, whose use is restricted due to the danger for human health. In this case, there are two advantages: these additives have the same properties as conventional ones, and they also respect the environment and human health because they come from renewable resources. Fishing industry waste was also used to obtain alternatives to ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH, of fossil origin) that have oxygen barrier properties. This fish-gelatin-based formula can be incorporated into food packaging film or used to actually coat food in the form of an edible coating that extends its shelf life. This case is a perfect example of circularity in that fish waste is reincorporated into the production chain to package food, thus preventing the generation of waste by using it as a new resource. In the case of municipal solid waste, the use of innovative fermentation processes has made it possible to extract building blocks from sugars (carbon source) that can be used to synthesize biopolymers such as bio-based polyamides. These materials come from renewable sources and also have applications in the automotive industry.

This project was funded by the European Union Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement number 720770.
The consortium is made up of the following companies and centres:
POLITECNICO DI TORINO, SINTEF OCEAN, SINTEF INDUSTRY, DANMARKS TEKNISKE UNIVERSITET, IRCELYON, NUTRIMAR, INOVAÇÃO I RECERCA INDUSTRIAL I SOSTENIBLE, BIOTREND – INOVAÇÃO E ENGENHARIA EM BIOTECNOLOGIA, DAREN LABORATORIES & SCIENTIFIC CONSULTANTS, MINE PLASTIK, BIO BASE EUROPE PILOT PLANT, BIOPOLIS, ARKEMA IRCELYON and THE NATIONAL NON- FOOD CROPS CENTRE

Cooperation to improve household waste recycling technologies

The OMNI project is one of the 7 winning projects selected by Citeo in the framework of its call for projects launched in October 2020. With OMNI, partners wish to develop innovative technologies for identifying household packaging and graphic paper, to improve the quality monitoring and control of recycled materials from collection to the final recycler.

The OMNI Project leverages artificial intelligence and image recognition to automatically identify, categorise and separate “food grade” from “non-food grade” plastic packaging.

A crucial step in recycling, automated sorting supported by artificial intelligence makes it possible to address a key problem in the recycling sector. Indeed, effective recognition and separation of items that have contained food product from others is not possible today.

Since its inception in 2019, Recycleye has validated and deployed across the UK and French markets a world leading AI vision system capable of identifying and classifying individual items of waste streams – by material, object and even brand. The OMNI Project will build on top of Recycleye’s existing capabilities to enable the detection of “food-grade” plastics.

The OMNI Project expands the accessible market for recyclables, by optimising the quality of recycled materials that are passed on to plastic manufacturers and developing new applications, such as food packaging.

Head of Operations at Recycleye, Isabelle Chapman Beltrão announced: “Partnering with Valorplast and Total as part of Citeo’s call for projects is pivotal in helping Recycleye achieve its mission to accelerate the world’s transition towards a circular economy, by further lowering risks associated with the automation of the waste management industry and enabling more materials to be identified and recycled. The developments targeted in the OMNI Project will make Recycleye the only provider of vision-based sorting incorporating “food-grade” plastic detection”.

Since its creation, Valorplast has focused on three areas to develop the circular economy of plastic packaging:

  • Increasing the recycling rate of household plastic packaging through eco-design and the extension of sorting instructions,
  • Guaranteeing high-quality recycled plastics to ensure their use in high value-added applications,
  • Innovating to co-develop the recycling channels of the future.

Alban Cotard, Sales, Quality and Development Manager at Valorplast commented: “We are very enthusiastic about the idea of participating in the development of these new technologies. They constitute an opportunity to progress sorting capabilities and advance the possibilities of high added value regeneration of household packaging.”

In line with these, the Valorplast teams dedicated to the OMNI Project will commit their operational expertise in sorting, intense sorting and recycling to the development of innovative technologies.

Total is deeply committed to recycling plastics and intends to produce 30% recycled polymers by 2030. As part of the OMNI project, Total’s teams will leverage their industrial and R&D expertise to improve the recyclability of plastics, derived from household waste, into high-performance recycled polymers, suitable for food applications.

“This partnership with Recycleye and Valorplast is an excellent example of collaboration and innovation to develop the recycling of food packaging. It opens new perspectives to meet the challenge of the circular economy and achieve our ambition of producing 30% recycled polymers by 2030″, said Valérie Goff, Senior Vice President, Polymers at Total.

Impact of the pandemic on municipal waste management systems

Although, the COVID-19 pandemic continues to hit Europe to this date, the report focuses on the first “wave” that goes from February to June 2020. The report is the continuation of an initiative started in March 2020, in the first hours of the pandemic, mapping how public authorities in Europe and beyond reacted and adapted their waste management systems to the urgency of the situation.

Brussels, Belgium – The pandemic proved very challenging for local authorities to keep the municipal waste services available to the inhabitants. ACR+ monitored and analysed how the measures taken in the wake of the COVID-19 outbreak impacted waste collection services, waste generation, and sorting performance. In March 2020, replying to requests from its members, ACR+ started collecting data on the changes brought to municipal waste management in various parts of Europe, both regarding the changes in regulation and guidelines proposed by national and regional authorities, and the local practices implemented by waste authorities and companies. The result of this initiative, including an infographic summarizing the observed trends in March, is available on the ACR+ website.

In July 2020, ACR+ launched an online survey in the framework of the COLLECTORS project to better understand the measures taken at local level and the evolution of generated and sorted quantities of municipal waste during the “first wave” of the pandemic. 16 respondents from 10 different countries provided detailed answers; the panel encompasses very different territories in terms of typology, size, or tourism intensity.

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on municipal waste management systems report discloses the main information and trends coming out of this survey. It also provides an overview of the measures taken by local authorities to tackle the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic and the lockdown measures during the firs. Local data were collected to analyse the impact of municipal waste generation and sorting performances. Besides, several illustrations of good practices addressing key challenges are also highlighted.

The analysis of the survey’s responses and of the different guidelines and reports identified allowed listing several key recommendations that were already presented in the COLLECTORS Guidelines for implementation:

  • Flexibility is key to ensure the continuation of priority collection services, and the territories that could maintain good collection were the ones that could re-allocate resources among the different collection schemes.
  • Keeping civic amenity sites open with adequate measure can be recommended, possibly with online booking.
  • Define priority levels for collection services, focusing on collection modes limiting the interactions with inhabitants, or on specific waste fractions. Keeping selective collection services running proves to be essential to maintain sorting performances.
  • Give priority to online communication to reach inhabitants, provide clear information and simple, coordinated messages, and explaining the reasons behind changes.
  • Establish a consistent and continuous reporting of the evolution of quantities.
  • Tackle illegal practices such as fly-tipping by setting a closer monitoring, the enforcement of the regulation, an adequate communication.
  • Take advantage of guidance, support systems and networks, to identify good practices and recommendations.
  • Follow UNEP recommendations regarding the management of waste from COVID-positive households.

Read the report

Avery Dennison: Global action plan for a zero waste future

Across the globe, two billion tonnes of waste are generated annually, according to The World Bank[1]. This report provides brands and retailers with a strategic framework for action, and outlines a set of key drivers that will help accelerate solutions for a zero-waste future and the transition to a circular economy.

The report, available free of charge, draws on experts, features best-practice case studies and details three ‘futures’ scenarios around Biomimicry Materials, Lifecycle Visibility, and Circular Ecosystems. In addition, it details six immediate focus areas to drive the zero-waste transition:

  1. Eco-design where products are designed waste-free with end-of-life and recyclability built in at the beginning of the design process.
  2. Reframing waste as a valuable resource of raw materials.
  3. Increased focus on consumer education around recycling.
  4. New legislation to avoid or limit the generation of unnecessary waste.
  5. Industry and cross-sector collaboration to propel systemic change.
  6. Widespread adoption of technologies that enable end-to-end supply chain visibility.

Already a major concern, the proliferation of waste and environmental pollution has been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. In the US, containers and packaging comprise 28% of the waste that ends up in landfill, according to the US Environmental Protection Agency. In December 2020, an estimated three billion packages[2] were shipped for Christmas in the US, an 800 million increase from the previous year.

Roughly one-third of food produced globally for human consumption each year – approximately 1.3 billion tonnes – gets lost or wasted[3]; while textile waste is estimated to increase by about 60% between 2015 and 2030, with an additional 57 million tons of waste generated annually, reaching an annual total of 148 million tons[4].

Tyler Chaffo, manager, global sustainability, Avery Dennison Smartrac comments, “The sheer scale of global waste has created a renewed sense of urgency. We need cross-sector collaboration and a shared vision to drive system-wide change because the problem must be solved from multiple angles. Each sector will need to create calculations around the materials they use, their environmental impact, where waste occurs on the supply chain and where it can be eliminated for the most sustainable outcome.”

The combination of materials and digital solutions will play a critical role. A huge part of the problem is ‘invisible waste’ caused by poor inventory management and overproduction. Solutions such as unique digital IDs, which provide end-to-end supply chain transparency, can make the invisible waste visible, creating more efficient inventory management and allowing businesses to eliminate unnecessary waste.

Rob Groen in ‘T Wout, marketing manager, films, Avery Dennison Label and Packaging Materials comments, “Embedding circular mindsets, materials, technologies and processes within every stage of a product’s life can unlock the incredible potential of a zero-waste future. This can also contribute to other related sustainable development goals. The time to change the status quo has well and truly come.”
The launch of the report follows the announcement of atma.ioTM, a new digital venture from Avery Dennison that bridges physical and digital worlds. The new end-to-end platform will enable circularity by creating, assigning, and managing unique digital identities for every physical item in the world.

RecyClass doubles capacity to certify recycled plastics content

The certification is geared at determining the actual shares of recycled content in plastic. To allow for the maximum transparency the Certifications are issued by independent third-party auditors who ensure reliable assessments and impartiality. Since its official launch in July last year the number of recognized auditors has more than doubled, representing today twenty-five auditors from twenty-one certification bodies from across Europe.

“This interest is a clear signal”, said Gian de Belder, Technical Director – R&D Packaging Sustainability at P&G and Advisory Board Chairman at RecyClass, he continued: “the industry as well as the actors of the plastics value chain are looking for reliable schemes to demonstrate and report on their sustainability goals in a coherent manner, he added, “and RecyClass meets their demands”.

The objective of the RecyClass Recycled Plastics Traceability Certification is to provide a transparent assessment of the incorporation of recycled content in products for companies looking for making verified environmental claims. It is destined to any company which plays a part in the value chain of plastics including but not limited to compounders, converters, blow moulders and brand owners. Beyond value chain it also brings trust in the recycled material to consumers.

The Certification bodies who recently joined the RecyClass Recycled Plastics Traceability scheme include: lms consulting in Austria; ecocycle GmbH, QHSE cert GmbH, Sachverstaendigenbuero Widmayer GmbH, ZN ZertifizierungsNetzwerk GmbH and HTP GmbH & Co. KG in Germany as well as, KPMG, AJIU & AIMPLAS in Spain, and lastly, DQS Hellas Ltd. and DQS doo Belgrade both in Greece and Serbia.

RecyClass doubles capacity to certify recycled plastics content

The certification is geared at determining the actual shares of recycled content in plastic. To allow for the maximum transparency the Certifications are issued by independent third-party auditors who ensure reliable assessments and impartiality. Since its official launch in July last year the number of recognized auditors has more than doubled, representing today twenty-five auditors from twenty-one certification bodies from across Europe.

“This interest is a clear signal”, said Gian de Belder, Technical Director – R&D Packaging Sustainability at P&G and Advisory Board Chairman at RecyClass, he continued: “the industry as well as the actors of the plastics value chain are looking for reliable schemes to demonstrate and report on their sustainability goals in a coherent manner, he added, “and RecyClass meets their demands”.

The objective of the RecyClass Recycled Plastics Traceability Certification is to provide a transparent assessment of the incorporation of recycled content in products for companies looking for making verified environmental claims. It is destined to any company which plays a part in the value chain of plastics including but not limited to compounders, converters, blow moulders and brand owners. Beyond value chain it also brings trust in the recycled material to consumers.

The Certification bodies who recently joined the RecyClass Recycled Plastics Traceability scheme include: lms consulting in Austria; ecocycle GmbH, QHSE cert GmbH, Sachverstaendigenbuero Widmayer GmbH, ZN ZertifizierungsNetzwerk GmbH and HTP GmbH & Co. KG in Germany as well as, KPMG, AJIU & AIMPLAS in Spain, and lastly, DQS Hellas Ltd. and DQS doo Belgrade both in Greece and Serbia.

WEEE Forum expands in three continents

With worldwide e-waste levels continuing to rise by around 3% per annum – and expected to reach in excess of 74 million tonnes (Mt) in 2030 according to UN research – attracting these organisations reflects the desire of the WEEE Forum to spread best practice, engage with actors in all parts of the world and the commitment of the growing global movement to ensuring that e-waste is collected and treated responsibly and in a manner that is not detrimental to people’s health and the environment.

WEEE Producer Responsibility Organisations are emerging across the globe, often ahead of the implementation of legislation in the countries in which they are based, and because of this they are not only helping to shape collection infrastructure in their countries but are also able to influence how e-waste legislation is developed. As a result, they are reaching out to the WEEE Forum to tap into the knowledge and experience of its current members, many of which have huge experience in operating under European legislation that has been in place for almost twenty years.

On announcing these new members, Pascal Leroy, Director General of the WEEE Forum said, “E-waste is increasingly being recognised as a priority waste stream across the world. Innovative organisations are being established that aim to put into practice Extended Producer Responsibility principles and lead the way in formalising e-waste collection, treatment and reporting in their countries. The WEEE Forum offers these organisations access to its network and knowledge base, and in return gains from these emerging PROs’ new approaches and attitudes towards e-waste. We are pleased to be able to welcome new members in Colombia and South Africa on top of recent additions in Nigeria, India, Australia, and Canada, as well as new members in Lithuania and Spain that add to our strong European base.”

The WEEE Forum recently introduced an initiative for “twinning” new producer responsibility organisations with existing, more established, members so each can share knowledge, information and exchange staff, amongst other things. This supports the views of the European Parliament on the Circular Economy Action Plan, which urges producers to take responsibility for products sold into markets outside the EU and to develop consistent approaches worldwide.

Phil Morton, Global Ambassador of the WEEE Forum said, “Our efforts to reach out to stakeholders in the e-waste sector across the world is to ensure e-waste sits high on the global environmental agenda. PROs in countries that are developing producer responsibility regulations can benefit hugely from joining the WEEE Forum and tapping into our experienced network. This work also supports the WEEE Forum’s stated aim of being the world #1 go-to competence centre for WEEE.”

The new members of the WEEE Forum are EcoCómputo and Red Verde from Colombia; ERA, South Africa; EEPA, Lithuania; and Ecolec, Spain. The WEEE Forum now has 43 members, at least one on every continent, and more than it has ever had before. It is looking forward to welcoming more PROs in the near future.