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Non-ferrous metals

Tomra Recycling invites to webinar on aluminum recycling

The aluminum recycling industry is constantly evolving and adapting to an increasing demand for this highly versatile material which results, among others, from a rise in electronic vehicle production, the trend towards more lightweight cars and the outstanding features this non-ferrous metal brings to numerous industries. A rise in demand offers a valuable proposition for the industry as it strongly encourages a more sustainable production which, in turn, supports the industry on its progress towards greener aluminum production.

Tomra’s webinar will further explore the future of the global aluminum recycling industry and detail how recycling can build the bridge between market pull and the industry push for greener aluminum.

In the 45 minutes live session, attendees can look forward to learning more about the aluminum recycling industry in general and recent innovations in sensor-based sorting technology, which will be highlighted by Tomra’s Segment Managers Metal Recycling, Tom Jansen and Terence Keyworth. In addition, Patrik Ragnarsson, Senior Manager Automotive and Transport at European Aluminium, will address the general trends in the automotive sector, especially with regards to the increase in electronic vehicle production, and will also detail the role aluminium plays within the sector. First-hand experiences in the scrap recycling landscape and the importance of having advanced technologies in place will be highlighted by Edward George, Commercial Manager at Alutrade Ltd.

A closing and interactive Q&A session at the end of the webinar which will provide an opportunity to explore specific topics in more detail.

Registration

Greater operational reliability in scrap and aluminium recycling

In situations, for example, where recovered, recycled aluminium is being used to produce new products, aluminium manufacturers need their secondary raw materials to display consistently high levels of purity. This is one of the challenges solved by sorting technology. Dry density sorting using x-ray transmission is a proven method that is used by hundreds of metal recycling firms around the globe. Simply considering processors of the high-performance material aluminium, the sorting machine is used to separate free heavy metals, aluminium compounds, free magnesium and wrought and cast aluminium parts. Steinert’s ongoing development work now ensures specific benefits for the sorting process.

EVO 5.0 generation with new functions
New software: Multilayer Data Evaluation provides even more distinguishing criteria and the automatic x-ray monitoring and calibration of the x-ray sensors help achieve consistently high levels of detection and sorting quality. Photo: Steinert

Thanks to Multilayer Data Evaluation (MDE), the sorting machine is able to use even more distinguishing criteria for detection thanks to high-resolution object recognition and by undertaking classification in parallel. Complex sorting tasks, such as magnesium detection are solved easily. Automatic x-ray monitoring and calibration (AXM) of the x-ray sensors help achieve consistently high detection and sorting quality.

The high-resolution valve pitch of 6.25 mm enables even more efficient sorting of fine material down to 5mm. Photo: Steinert

The hardware has also been improved. The high-resolution valve pitch of 6.25 mm enables even more efficient sorting of fine material down to 5 mm. The x-ray scan area is cleaned automatically in the new generation of machines. This vastly reduces the amount of manual cleaning needed and maintains a consistently high level of detection quality. The 4-year warranty for the x-ray source and sensors provides operational reliability and keeps operating costs low.

A so-called solution guide can be downloaded as an e-book to provide an initial overview of the opportunities provided for sorting aluminium scrap and other materials. Although aluminium scrap comes from different sources like profiles and plates, incineration bottom ash, shredder systems or Dense Media Separation (DMS), the rough stages of the sorting process are similar: recovering non-ferrous metals and upgrading the recovered metals, in other words, producing pure metal types. The e-book provides insight into both the heart of the systems – the Steinert XSS T EVO 5.0 – as well as the upstream magnet technology and downstream fluorescence technology; of benefit to operators of aluminium shredders, secondary smelters or processors of waste incinerator ash. The downstream fluorescence technology produces pure heavy metal fractions such as copper, brass and zinc.

Download e-book

Greater operational reliability in scrap and aluminium recycling

In situations, for example, where recovered, recycled aluminium is being used to produce new products, aluminium manufacturers need their secondary raw materials to display consistently high levels of purity. This is one of the challenges solved by sorting technology. Dry density sorting using x-ray transmission is a proven method that is used by hundreds of metal recycling firms around the globe. Simply considering processors of the high-performance material aluminium, the sorting machine is used to separate free heavy metals, aluminium compounds, free magnesium and wrought and cast aluminium parts. Steinert’s ongoing development work now ensures specific benefits for the sorting process.

EVO 5.0 generation with new functions
New software: Multilayer Data Evaluation provides even more distinguishing criteria and the automatic x-ray monitoring and calibration of the x-ray sensors help achieve consistently high levels of detection and sorting quality. Photo: Steinert

Thanks to Multilayer Data Evaluation (MDE), the sorting machine is able to use even more distinguishing criteria for detection thanks to high-resolution object recognition and by undertaking classification in parallel. Complex sorting tasks, such as magnesium detection are solved easily. Automatic x-ray monitoring and calibration (AXM) of the x-ray sensors help achieve consistently high detection and sorting quality.

The high-resolution valve pitch of 6.25 mm enables even more efficient sorting of fine material down to 5mm. Photo: Steinert

The hardware has also been improved. The high-resolution valve pitch of 6.25 mm enables even more efficient sorting of fine material down to 5 mm. The x-ray scan area is cleaned automatically in the new generation of machines. This vastly reduces the amount of manual cleaning needed and maintains a consistently high level of detection quality. The 4-year warranty for the x-ray source and sensors provides operational reliability and keeps operating costs low.

A so-called solution guide can be downloaded as an e-book to provide an initial overview of the opportunities provided for sorting aluminium scrap and other materials. Although aluminium scrap comes from different sources like profiles and plates, incineration bottom ash, shredder systems or Dense Media Separation (DMS), the rough stages of the sorting process are similar: recovering non-ferrous metals and upgrading the recovered metals, in other words, producing pure metal types. The e-book provides insight into both the heart of the systems – the Steinert XSS T EVO 5.0 – as well as the upstream magnet technology and downstream fluorescence technology; of benefit to operators of aluminium shredders, secondary smelters or processors of waste incinerator ash. The downstream fluorescence technology produces pure heavy metal fractions such as copper, brass and zinc.

Download e-book

Greater operational reliability in scrap and aluminium recycling

In situations, for example, where recovered, recycled aluminium is being used to produce new products, aluminium manufacturers need their secondary raw materials to display consistently high levels of purity. This is one of the challenges solved by sorting technology. Dry density sorting using x-ray transmission is a proven method that is used by hundreds of metal recycling firms around the globe. Simply considering processors of the high-performance material aluminium, the sorting machine is used to separate free heavy metals, aluminium compounds, free magnesium and wrought and cast aluminium parts. Steinert’s ongoing development work now ensures specific benefits for the sorting process.

EVO 5.0 generation with new functions
New software: Multilayer Data Evaluation provides even more distinguishing criteria and the automatic x-ray monitoring and calibration of the x-ray sensors help achieve consistently high levels of detection and sorting quality. Photo: Steinert

Thanks to Multilayer Data Evaluation (MDE), the sorting machine is able to use even more distinguishing criteria for detection thanks to high-resolution object recognition and by undertaking classification in parallel. Complex sorting tasks, such as magnesium detection are solved easily. Automatic x-ray monitoring and calibration (AXM) of the x-ray sensors help achieve consistently high detection and sorting quality.

The high-resolution valve pitch of 6.25 mm enables even more efficient sorting of fine material down to 5mm. Photo: Steinert

The hardware has also been improved. The high-resolution valve pitch of 6.25 mm enables even more efficient sorting of fine material down to 5 mm. The x-ray scan area is cleaned automatically in the new generation of machines. This vastly reduces the amount of manual cleaning needed and maintains a consistently high level of detection quality. The 4-year warranty for the x-ray source and sensors provides operational reliability and keeps operating costs low.

A so-called solution guide can be downloaded as an e-book to provide an initial overview of the opportunities provided for sorting aluminium scrap and other materials. Although aluminium scrap comes from different sources like profiles and plates, incineration bottom ash, shredder systems or Dense Media Separation (DMS), the rough stages of the sorting process are similar: recovering non-ferrous metals and upgrading the recovered metals, in other words, producing pure metal types. The e-book provides insight into both the heart of the systems – the Steinert XSS T EVO 5.0 – as well as the upstream magnet technology and downstream fluorescence technology; of benefit to operators of aluminium shredders, secondary smelters or processors of waste incinerator ash. The downstream fluorescence technology produces pure heavy metal fractions such as copper, brass and zinc.

Download e-book

Greater operational reliability in scrap and aluminium recycling

In situations, for example, where recovered, recycled aluminium is being used to produce new products, aluminium manufacturers need their secondary raw materials to display consistently high levels of purity. This is one of the challenges solved by sorting technology. Dry density sorting using x-ray transmission is a proven method that is used by hundreds of metal recycling firms around the globe. Simply considering processors of the high-performance material aluminium, the sorting machine is used to separate free heavy metals, aluminium compounds, free magnesium and wrought and cast aluminium parts. Steinert’s ongoing development work now ensures specific benefits for the sorting process.

EVO 5.0 generation with new functions
New software: Multilayer Data Evaluation provides even more distinguishing criteria and the automatic x-ray monitoring and calibration of the x-ray sensors help achieve consistently high levels of detection and sorting quality. Photo: Steinert

Thanks to Multilayer Data Evaluation (MDE), the sorting machine is able to use even more distinguishing criteria for detection thanks to high-resolution object recognition and by undertaking classification in parallel. Complex sorting tasks, such as magnesium detection are solved easily. Automatic x-ray monitoring and calibration (AXM) of the x-ray sensors help achieve consistently high detection and sorting quality.

The high-resolution valve pitch of 6.25 mm enables even more efficient sorting of fine material down to 5mm. Photo: Steinert

The hardware has also been improved. The high-resolution valve pitch of 6.25 mm enables even more efficient sorting of fine material down to 5 mm. The x-ray scan area is cleaned automatically in the new generation of machines. This vastly reduces the amount of manual cleaning needed and maintains a consistently high level of detection quality. The 4-year warranty for the x-ray source and sensors provides operational reliability and keeps operating costs low.

A so-called solution guide can be downloaded as an e-book to provide an initial overview of the opportunities provided for sorting aluminium scrap and other materials. Although aluminium scrap comes from different sources like profiles and plates, incineration bottom ash, shredder systems or Dense Media Separation (DMS), the rough stages of the sorting process are similar: recovering non-ferrous metals and upgrading the recovered metals, in other words, producing pure metal types. The e-book provides insight into both the heart of the systems – the Steinert XSS T EVO 5.0 – as well as the upstream magnet technology and downstream fluorescence technology; of benefit to operators of aluminium shredders, secondary smelters or processors of waste incinerator ash. The downstream fluorescence technology produces pure heavy metal fractions such as copper, brass and zinc.

Download e-book

Global Recycling Foundations Reforestation Initiative

The event, held in conjunction with the Global Recycling Foundation (GRF), also marked 20 years in business by Recycled Products. The company was honored to have the founding president of the GRF, Ranjit Baxi, join with managing director Susie Burrage in planting the first tree – a Prunus Cherry Plum, which had just started to blossom. The other trees include beech, which have come to symbolise the idyllic Chilterns countryside.

Recycled Products is leading the way in backing the UK’s goal to be net carbon neutral by 2050. By using recycled copper, CO2 emissions can be reduced by 65% compared to use of mined primary copper, for example. Recycling aluminium gives a higher 92% reduction, and the figure is a headline, 99% for recycled lead.

Susie Burrage, managing director of Recycled Products, said: “All recycled materials are inherently low carbon, so metal recyclers have a key role to play as society looks to cut CO2 emissions in the decades ahead. This doesn’t absolve us of all responsibility for working on reducing our own carbon footprint, however.

“Global Recycling Day is a great reminder that we all – from individuals to large companies and governments – must play our part in achieving net-zero carbon emissions and limit the worst effects of climate change.

“Those of us working in the recycling sector are more aware of this than most and are therefore making every effort to limit our carbon emissions. Recycled Products are offsetting unavoidable emissions by planting trees.”

Constellium planning a recycling investment in Europe

This project will be focused on using recycled material to provide slabs for Constellium’s automotive and packaging businesses in Europe. This strategic initiative is expected to add a minimum of 60 kt of annual capacity to Constellium’s current recycling footprint, which is already one of the largest in the world.

“We are excited about the potential to increase our recycling capacity in Europe. We already benefit from the inherently sustainable aspects of aluminium, including its strength, its light weight, and its infinite recyclability. An investment in expanding our recycling capacity is a strong demonstration of our commitment to sustainability. I expect this will be a meaningful contributor to both our financial and ESG objectives over time,” said Jean-Marc Germain, Constellium CEO. “Furthermore, aluminium is at the epicenter of several sustainability mega-trends across our packaging, automotive, and transportation end markets. As a result, our customers are increasingly demanding products that are sustainably and responsibly produced. We expect this investment will provide opportunities for Constellium to expand its low-carbon product offerings to meet customer needs.”

The inherently sustainable attributes of aluminium are driving increased demand for the advanced aluminium solutions produced by Constellium. In packaging, aluminium cans are the most recycled beverage containers, infinitely reborn in a “closed loop” process that has them back on the shelf in 60 days. In automotive and transportation, aluminium helps advance greener mobility by improving fuel economy, reducing CO2 emissions, increasing electric vehicle range, and improving safety.

Recycling scrap is critical to the aluminum life cycle. Using scrap reduces the need for primary aluminium and therefore minimizes waste, avoids resource depletion, and lowers greenhouse gas emissions across a product’s life cycle. Aluminium is infinitely and easily recyclable, with 75% of all aluminum ever produced still in use today. Using scrap aluminium is also more energy efficient and has a lower environmental impact than primary aluminium. Recycling scrap requires only 5% of the energy used to produce primary metal and delivers up to 95% in CO2 savings when compared to virgin material.

Constellium expects to finalize the scope and location of the project by the end of 2021, which will be dependent upon finalizing engineering and obtaining required permits. Start of production is expected to begin within two years of when construction begins. Constellium will provide regular updates on this important strategic initiative.

Constellium planning a recycling investment in Europe

This project will be focused on using recycled material to provide slabs for Constellium’s automotive and packaging businesses in Europe. This strategic initiative is expected to add a minimum of 60 kt of annual capacity to Constellium’s current recycling footprint, which is already one of the largest in the world.

“We are excited about the potential to increase our recycling capacity in Europe. We already benefit from the inherently sustainable aspects of aluminium, including its strength, its light weight, and its infinite recyclability. An investment in expanding our recycling capacity is a strong demonstration of our commitment to sustainability. I expect this will be a meaningful contributor to both our financial and ESG objectives over time,” said Jean-Marc Germain, Constellium CEO. “Furthermore, aluminium is at the epicenter of several sustainability mega-trends across our packaging, automotive, and transportation end markets. As a result, our customers are increasingly demanding products that are sustainably and responsibly produced. We expect this investment will provide opportunities for Constellium to expand its low-carbon product offerings to meet customer needs.”

The inherently sustainable attributes of aluminium are driving increased demand for the advanced aluminium solutions produced by Constellium. In packaging, aluminium cans are the most recycled beverage containers, infinitely reborn in a “closed loop” process that has them back on the shelf in 60 days. In automotive and transportation, aluminium helps advance greener mobility by improving fuel economy, reducing CO2 emissions, increasing electric vehicle range, and improving safety.

Recycling scrap is critical to the aluminum life cycle. Using scrap reduces the need for primary aluminium and therefore minimizes waste, avoids resource depletion, and lowers greenhouse gas emissions across a product’s life cycle. Aluminium is infinitely and easily recyclable, with 75% of all aluminum ever produced still in use today. Using scrap aluminium is also more energy efficient and has a lower environmental impact than primary aluminium. Recycling scrap requires only 5% of the energy used to produce primary metal and delivers up to 95% in CO2 savings when compared to virgin material.

Constellium expects to finalize the scope and location of the project by the end of 2021, which will be dependent upon finalizing engineering and obtaining required permits. Start of production is expected to begin within two years of when construction begins. Constellium will provide regular updates on this important strategic initiative.

A time for the scrap industry to channel its “passion and positivity”

This had been widely expected to enter force on July 1 but, more than three months later at the Division’s webinar on October 15, the exact details and launch date for the new import arrangements remained the “million-dollar question”, according to Shen Dong of Omnisource Corporation, LLC.

In the meantime, he reported, China had remained a significant world market: its 12 batches of import quotas issued to date in 2020 had amounted to 879,475 tons of copper scrap and 818,000 tons of aluminium scrap. However, many shipping lines had stopped accepting scrap cargoes for China given its imminent ban on solid waste imports. Lines were also reluctant to ship to Hong Kong, the speaker noted.

Introduced by divisional President David Chiao of Uni-All Group Ltd, the webinar featured a question/answer session moderated by Natalia Zholud of Belarus-based TRM Group as well as a series of market reports.

Dhawal Shah of Metco Marketing (India) PVT Ltd said the domestic secondary non-ferrous sector had mirrored the recent upturn in most other parts of his country’s economy, with the crucial automotive industry boosted notably in recent months by rural demand. A “very ambitious” nationwide vehicle scrappage programme would be unveiled shortly and should have a “tranformational” impact on new car sales and domestic scrap loops.

Mr Shah also relayed feedback on developments in Pakistan which, he said, boasted “one of the fastest-growing recycling industries”. Once China had begun to make changes to its environmental laws, “a lot of non-ferrous scrap started going to Pakistan for recycling and smelting to make ingots for the domestic and international markets,” he explained. “Pakistan also senses that, if they are to grow, they need to ensure that they wholly and squarely address environmental concerns as well, and they are putting new investment in that direction.”

According to Nick Hinohara of Japan-based Metal Solution Provider, recovery within the Japanese automotive sector had led to a “very tight” domestic market for aluminium scrap whereas demand for No 2 copper scrap was “relatively weak”. For the USA, Rick Dobkin of Shapiro Metals reported that secondary aluminium scrap exports had been finding their way to healthy markets in Asia, thus “making the domestic scramble for scrap ever more pressing”.

Sidney Lazarus of Non-Ferrous Metal Works (SA) (PTY) Ltd confirmed an improvement in business conditions as well as greater scrap dealer activity within South Africa. Regarding the Middle East, however, he expressed some concerns that the pandemic had led to the postponement of a number of major projects that, once they go ahead, would have a substantial beneficial impact on metals demand.

Summing up the sentiments of several contributors to the webinar, the report from Leopoldo Clemente of Italy-based LCD Trading SRL urged the scrap sector to continue to harness its innate “passion and positivity”. Southern Europe had been hit particularly hard by the pandemic, he said, but a recent survey of 6000-plus Italian businesses indicated that more than half had either already returned to pre-COVID levels of activity or expected to do so in the fourth quarter.

Reporting for the rest of Europe, Mogens Christensen of H.J. Hansen Recycling Industry Ltd AS of Denmark said markets were returning to “some kind of new normal”. Speaking in the context of the recently-introduced European Green Deal aimed at making the continent more resource-efficient and climate-neutral, he insisted: “The recycling of non-ferrous metals is crucial to reaching the targets. We must make it clear to everybody that free trade in scrap metals is contributing to the development of the Circular Economy.”

A time for the scrap industry to channel its “passion and positivity”

This had been widely expected to enter force on July 1 but, more than three months later at the Division’s webinar on October 15, the exact details and launch date for the new import arrangements remained the “million-dollar question”, according to Shen Dong of Omnisource Corporation, LLC.

In the meantime, he reported, China had remained a significant world market: its 12 batches of import quotas issued to date in 2020 had amounted to 879,475 tons of copper scrap and 818,000 tons of aluminium scrap. However, many shipping lines had stopped accepting scrap cargoes for China given its imminent ban on solid waste imports. Lines were also reluctant to ship to Hong Kong, the speaker noted.

Introduced by divisional President David Chiao of Uni-All Group Ltd, the webinar featured a question/answer session moderated by Natalia Zholud of Belarus-based TRM Group as well as a series of market reports.

Dhawal Shah of Metco Marketing (India) PVT Ltd said the domestic secondary non-ferrous sector had mirrored the recent upturn in most other parts of his country’s economy, with the crucial automotive industry boosted notably in recent months by rural demand. A “very ambitious” nationwide vehicle scrappage programme would be unveiled shortly and should have a “tranformational” impact on new car sales and domestic scrap loops.

Mr Shah also relayed feedback on developments in Pakistan which, he said, boasted “one of the fastest-growing recycling industries”. Once China had begun to make changes to its environmental laws, “a lot of non-ferrous scrap started going to Pakistan for recycling and smelting to make ingots for the domestic and international markets,” he explained. “Pakistan also senses that, if they are to grow, they need to ensure that they wholly and squarely address environmental concerns as well, and they are putting new investment in that direction.”

According to Nick Hinohara of Japan-based Metal Solution Provider, recovery within the Japanese automotive sector had led to a “very tight” domestic market for aluminium scrap whereas demand for No 2 copper scrap was “relatively weak”. For the USA, Rick Dobkin of Shapiro Metals reported that secondary aluminium scrap exports had been finding their way to healthy markets in Asia, thus “making the domestic scramble for scrap ever more pressing”.

Sidney Lazarus of Non-Ferrous Metal Works (SA) (PTY) Ltd confirmed an improvement in business conditions as well as greater scrap dealer activity within South Africa. Regarding the Middle East, however, he expressed some concerns that the pandemic had led to the postponement of a number of major projects that, once they go ahead, would have a substantial beneficial impact on metals demand.

Summing up the sentiments of several contributors to the webinar, the report from Leopoldo Clemente of Italy-based LCD Trading SRL urged the scrap sector to continue to harness its innate “passion and positivity”. Southern Europe had been hit particularly hard by the pandemic, he said, but a recent survey of 6000-plus Italian businesses indicated that more than half had either already returned to pre-COVID levels of activity or expected to do so in the fourth quarter.

Reporting for the rest of Europe, Mogens Christensen of H.J. Hansen Recycling Industry Ltd AS of Denmark said markets were returning to “some kind of new normal”. Speaking in the context of the recently-introduced European Green Deal aimed at making the continent more resource-efficient and climate-neutral, he insisted: “The recycling of non-ferrous metals is crucial to reaching the targets. We must make it clear to everybody that free trade in scrap metals is contributing to the development of the Circular Economy.”