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Electrification: Opportunities and obstacles for battery recycling

Whilst at present only 20% of energy consumed in the industrial sector is electric, according to McKinsey’s latest projections, this figure could be as high as 50% using technologies available today.

Faced with growing demand, the global industrial battery market is expected to experience an annual growth rate of 6% from 2020 to 2027 according to the latest report from Grand View Research. Whilst at present, lead-acid remains the dominant battery type, accounting for over 47% of the market share, demand for lithium-ion batteries is increasing as well, as it becomes a more commercial option and is expected to increase at an annual growth rate of 15.70% within the forecast period.

But as we look ahead to a world in which the industrial sector is becoming increasingly electrified, one issue looms large: how are we going to handle the sheer volume of battery waste?

If left in a landfill site, both lead-acid and lithium-ion batteries have the potential to leach toxic materials to the surrounding area, causing severe damage to both people and the environment. The same can be said for so-called ‘backyard recycling’, an extremely dangerous and damaging practice of unregulated recycling by individuals or unqualified firms, which has resulted in cases of lead contamination worldwide.

It’s an issue that global health and development organisations are all too aware of, with lead-acid batteries being labelled one of the world’s worst pollution problems by NGOs Pure Green and Green Cross Switzerland in 2016.

In Greece, where Sunlight is headquartered, the situation was, until very recently, particularly dire. Four years ago, just 51% of used scrap batteries were legally recycled or collected compared to the European average figure of 95%, with the remaining 49% suspected to have been disposed of or recycled illegally, contributing to environmental lead contamination.

Sunlight’s response was to create our own EMAS-certified recycling facility for lead acid batteries in 2014, which has enabled us to employ the circular economy model.

Through facilities such as this one, trusted manufacturers are capable of recycling up to 95% of lead-acid batteries. Not only does this achieve vertical integration of the lead supply but also provides better control over the composition and quality of lead alloys. As well as providing better control over the delivery timelines of lead needed to produce new batteries, inhouse recycling also comes with an economic benefit – the reduced importing cost of the lead needed to make new batteries.

Through this circular economy model, we produce 60% of our production unit’s demand in lead. However more demand means that other manufacturers need to follow suit, particularly in the Asia-Pacific where a large amount of the global supply of industrial batteries is developed.

Whilst facilities such as this are paving the way for lead-acid battery recycling, such sophisticated facilities for the recycling of lithium-ion remain scarce. Thus, whilst at present innovation allows for the recycling of up to 95% of a lead-acid battery, for lithium this figure stands below 50%.

As a relatively new commercial battery technology, the chemistry, shape and design of lithium batteries varies enormously between manufacturers. As such, in order for them to be recycled efficiently, they need to be disassembled, and the resulting waste streams separated, however at the present moment there is still no way to recycle the electrode.

Whilst universities and research centres are still at the early stages of finding a solution to recycling the entire lithium battery, there are still grounds for optimism when it comes to reusing this material. When a lithium-ion battery reaches the end of its life, it still retains around 80% of its charge, which can then be used to power another battery.

But with the total amount of lithium-ion batteries expected to reach 7.8 million tonnes per year by 2040, according to a report from IDTechEx, it’s anticipated that the global supply of end-of-life batteries will surpass their demand in second-life applications.
Similarly, not all lithium-ion batteries will be reusable – those that are damaged, for instance, will need recycling instantly. And of course, batteries do eventually die for good. Therefore, there is a need for a forward-thinking approach to recycling to ensure efficient long-term management of waste.

The pandemic has generated more stimulus by governments across the world to rebuild economies through the investment of green companies and jobs. So, if we’re serious about making this a reality, we must prioritize sustainable recycling of batteries on a global scale – and it must start with battery manufacturers taking responsibility for managing the waste created by their products – whether that’s through recycling or the reusing of materials.

For further information on Systems Sunlight recycling capabilities, please visit: https://www.greenmission.gr/en/.

Electrification: Opportunities and obstacles for battery recycling

Whilst at present only 20% of energy consumed in the industrial sector is electric, according to McKinsey’s latest projections, this figure could be as high as 50% using technologies available today.

Faced with growing demand, the global industrial battery market is expected to experience an annual growth rate of 6% from 2020 to 2027 according to the latest report from Grand View Research. Whilst at present, lead-acid remains the dominant battery type, accounting for over 47% of the market share, demand for lithium-ion batteries is increasing as well, as it becomes a more commercial option and is expected to increase at an annual growth rate of 15.70% within the forecast period.

But as we look ahead to a world in which the industrial sector is becoming increasingly electrified, one issue looms large: how are we going to handle the sheer volume of battery waste?

If left in a landfill site, both lead-acid and lithium-ion batteries have the potential to leach toxic materials to the surrounding area, causing severe damage to both people and the environment. The same can be said for so-called ‘backyard recycling’, an extremely dangerous and damaging practice of unregulated recycling by individuals or unqualified firms, which has resulted in cases of lead contamination worldwide.

It’s an issue that global health and development organisations are all too aware of, with lead-acid batteries being labelled one of the world’s worst pollution problems by NGOs Pure Green and Green Cross Switzerland in 2016.

In Greece, where Sunlight is headquartered, the situation was, until very recently, particularly dire. Four years ago, just 51% of used scrap batteries were legally recycled or collected compared to the European average figure of 95%, with the remaining 49% suspected to have been disposed of or recycled illegally, contributing to environmental lead contamination.

Sunlight’s response was to create our own EMAS-certified recycling facility for lead acid batteries in 2014, which has enabled us to employ the circular economy model.

Through facilities such as this one, trusted manufacturers are capable of recycling up to 95% of lead-acid batteries. Not only does this achieve vertical integration of the lead supply but also provides better control over the composition and quality of lead alloys. As well as providing better control over the delivery timelines of lead needed to produce new batteries, inhouse recycling also comes with an economic benefit – the reduced importing cost of the lead needed to make new batteries.

Through this circular economy model, we produce 60% of our production unit’s demand in lead. However more demand means that other manufacturers need to follow suit, particularly in the Asia-Pacific where a large amount of the global supply of industrial batteries is developed.

Whilst facilities such as this are paving the way for lead-acid battery recycling, such sophisticated facilities for the recycling of lithium-ion remain scarce. Thus, whilst at present innovation allows for the recycling of up to 95% of a lead-acid battery, for lithium this figure stands below 50%.

As a relatively new commercial battery technology, the chemistry, shape and design of lithium batteries varies enormously between manufacturers. As such, in order for them to be recycled efficiently, they need to be disassembled, and the resulting waste streams separated, however at the present moment there is still no way to recycle the electrode.

Whilst universities and research centres are still at the early stages of finding a solution to recycling the entire lithium battery, there are still grounds for optimism when it comes to reusing this material. When a lithium-ion battery reaches the end of its life, it still retains around 80% of its charge, which can then be used to power another battery.

But with the total amount of lithium-ion batteries expected to reach 7.8 million tonnes per year by 2040, according to a report from IDTechEx, it’s anticipated that the global supply of end-of-life batteries will surpass their demand in second-life applications.
Similarly, not all lithium-ion batteries will be reusable – those that are damaged, for instance, will need recycling instantly. And of course, batteries do eventually die for good. Therefore, there is a need for a forward-thinking approach to recycling to ensure efficient long-term management of waste.

The pandemic has generated more stimulus by governments across the world to rebuild economies through the investment of green companies and jobs. So, if we’re serious about making this a reality, we must prioritize sustainable recycling of batteries on a global scale – and it must start with battery manufacturers taking responsibility for managing the waste created by their products – whether that’s through recycling or the reusing of materials.

For further information on Systems Sunlight recycling capabilities, please visit: https://www.greenmission.gr/en/.

Electrification: Opportunities and obstacles for battery recycling

Whilst at present only 20% of energy consumed in the industrial sector is electric, according to McKinsey’s latest projections, this figure could be as high as 50% using technologies available today.

Faced with growing demand, the global industrial battery market is expected to experience an annual growth rate of 6% from 2020 to 2027 according to the latest report from Grand View Research. Whilst at present, lead-acid remains the dominant battery type, accounting for over 47% of the market share, demand for lithium-ion batteries is increasing as well, as it becomes a more commercial option and is expected to increase at an annual growth rate of 15.70% within the forecast period.

But as we look ahead to a world in which the industrial sector is becoming increasingly electrified, one issue looms large: how are we going to handle the sheer volume of battery waste?

If left in a landfill site, both lead-acid and lithium-ion batteries have the potential to leach toxic materials to the surrounding area, causing severe damage to both people and the environment. The same can be said for so-called ‘backyard recycling’, an extremely dangerous and damaging practice of unregulated recycling by individuals or unqualified firms, which has resulted in cases of lead contamination worldwide.

It’s an issue that global health and development organisations are all too aware of, with lead-acid batteries being labelled one of the world’s worst pollution problems by NGOs Pure Green and Green Cross Switzerland in 2016.

In Greece, where Sunlight is headquartered, the situation was, until very recently, particularly dire. Four years ago, just 51% of used scrap batteries were legally recycled or collected compared to the European average figure of 95%, with the remaining 49% suspected to have been disposed of or recycled illegally, contributing to environmental lead contamination.

Sunlight’s response was to create our own EMAS-certified recycling facility for lead acid batteries in 2014, which has enabled us to employ the circular economy model.

Through facilities such as this one, trusted manufacturers are capable of recycling up to 95% of lead-acid batteries. Not only does this achieve vertical integration of the lead supply but also provides better control over the composition and quality of lead alloys. As well as providing better control over the delivery timelines of lead needed to produce new batteries, inhouse recycling also comes with an economic benefit – the reduced importing cost of the lead needed to make new batteries.

Through this circular economy model, we produce 60% of our production unit’s demand in lead. However more demand means that other manufacturers need to follow suit, particularly in the Asia-Pacific where a large amount of the global supply of industrial batteries is developed.

Whilst facilities such as this are paving the way for lead-acid battery recycling, such sophisticated facilities for the recycling of lithium-ion remain scarce. Thus, whilst at present innovation allows for the recycling of up to 95% of a lead-acid battery, for lithium this figure stands below 50%.

As a relatively new commercial battery technology, the chemistry, shape and design of lithium batteries varies enormously between manufacturers. As such, in order for them to be recycled efficiently, they need to be disassembled, and the resulting waste streams separated, however at the present moment there is still no way to recycle the electrode.

Whilst universities and research centres are still at the early stages of finding a solution to recycling the entire lithium battery, there are still grounds for optimism when it comes to reusing this material. When a lithium-ion battery reaches the end of its life, it still retains around 80% of its charge, which can then be used to power another battery.

But with the total amount of lithium-ion batteries expected to reach 7.8 million tonnes per year by 2040, according to a report from IDTechEx, it’s anticipated that the global supply of end-of-life batteries will surpass their demand in second-life applications.
Similarly, not all lithium-ion batteries will be reusable – those that are damaged, for instance, will need recycling instantly. And of course, batteries do eventually die for good. Therefore, there is a need for a forward-thinking approach to recycling to ensure efficient long-term management of waste.

The pandemic has generated more stimulus by governments across the world to rebuild economies through the investment of green companies and jobs. So, if we’re serious about making this a reality, we must prioritize sustainable recycling of batteries on a global scale – and it must start with battery manufacturers taking responsibility for managing the waste created by their products – whether that’s through recycling or the reusing of materials.

For further information on Systems Sunlight recycling capabilities, please visit: https://www.greenmission.gr/en/.

General Assembly of FEAD

FEAD is pleased to present some of the most important developments taking place in the association. The association welcomed on board BORA, the Bulgarian Recovery and Recycling Association, FEAD’s first Bulgarian Member, in addition to a new permanent member of the FEAD Board from Polish member, PIGO. FEAD will now be focusing even more on eastern-Europe.

Colleagues from the United Kingdom, ESA, will remain and continue their collaboration with FEAD.

The new member of the board coming from Dutch association, DWMA, will be pivotal in increasing the role of FEAD’s business in European affairs.

The association also welcomed its first seven affiliated members, allowing private waste management companies to be directly associated to our work and provide FEAD with more resources.

Peter Kurth, FEAD’s President states: “I am happy and proud after yesterday’s meeting. After intense discussions we made some good steps forward. In times of the European Green Deal and the Circular Economy Action Plan, our companies have to have a strong voice in Europe.”

General Assembly of FEAD

FEAD is pleased to present some of the most important developments taking place in the association. The association welcomed on board BORA, the Bulgarian Recovery and Recycling Association, FEAD’s first Bulgarian Member, in addition to a new permanent member of the FEAD Board from Polish member, PIGO. FEAD will now be focusing even more on eastern-Europe.

Colleagues from the United Kingdom, ESA, will remain and continue their collaboration with FEAD.

The new member of the board coming from Dutch association, DWMA, will be pivotal in increasing the role of FEAD’s business in European affairs.

The association also welcomed its first seven affiliated members, allowing private waste management companies to be directly associated to our work and provide FEAD with more resources.

Peter Kurth, FEAD’s President states: “I am happy and proud after yesterday’s meeting. After intense discussions we made some good steps forward. In times of the European Green Deal and the Circular Economy Action Plan, our companies have to have a strong voice in Europe.”

The management of plastics and the “actions” of the Attica prefecture

Sustainability has become perhaps the most critical issue facing the plastics industry and is reaching an unprecedented level of global – public, corporate and governmental – awareness and concern. From a value chain perspective, plastics producers, processors, brand owners and the financial community all have an interest in playing an active role.

Giorgos Patoulis, Regional Governon of Attica

The plastics and chemical industries are under increasing public scrutiny due to the accumulated plastic waste in the ocean from their uncontrolled release into rivers and oceans, especially in Southeast Asia. Various scientific reports of microplastics entering the biological food chain raise further concerns for the public. The impact of uncontrolled plastic waste management after initial use is eroding the public image of chemicals and may even cause “social authorization”.

Simply put, the future of the plastics industry and its “social license” is based on how stakeholders respond.

The challenges are huge as the full development of the three critical corners of the plastic recycling triangle – collection / sorting, processing, and end-use application – remains in early development. Today, many collection systems are under financial pressure and flooded with waste volumes of all materials (glass, plastic, paper).

European Targets 2030

Sustainability goals, when set, are often without a fundamental understanding of the potential of existing infrastructure. For example, Europe, which is considered to be the most sustainable-advanced region on the planet, should substantially double its infrastructure capacity by adding around 300 recycling facilities and 300 for sorting, requiring around € 1.5 billion a year by 2026 for funding to achieve the goals it has set.

In particular, the strategy set by the European Union stipulates that all plastic packaging available on the EU market will either be reusable or can be recycled in a cost-effective manner. The main goal of the vision, however, predicts that by 2030 at least 55% of plastic waste produced in Europe will be recycled.

Greece Today

According to a recent study by IOBE, Greece ranks last among EU28 countries in terms of solid waste management as most solid waste is disposed of in landfills while reuse and recycling are extremely limited. Greece came second from the end in solid waste recycling in the European ranking for 2020.

Consequently, the Greek economy relies almost exclusively on prime, and in many cases imported, raw materials, resulting in a low ranking of cyclical indices, resulting in the loss of significant opportunities for the creation of domestic added value and employment

Finland – Plastics Recycling Example

In 2019 Neste Oil, the world’s leading provider of renewable diesel, renewable jet fuel, and an expert in delivering drop-in renewable chemical solutions, and Remondis, one of the world’s largest privately owned recycling, service and water companies, have signed an agreement to collaborate in the development of chemical recycling of plastic waste.

This collaboration will assist the Helsinki prefecture in achieving EU’s 2030 recycling targets. The goal of this partnership is to achieve the recycling / conversion of one million metric tons of plastics per year into chemical naphtha (which will be used to produce plastics) in the company’s refineries by 2030.

Attica Prefecture – Greece – Actions to Achieve the Recycling Objectives of the European Directives

The effort to transition to a form of circular economy is already at the heart of the strategic planning of the Attica prefecture. The region is already planning and implementing interventions so that plastic waste is converted into resources that can be utilized by the domestic plastics industry while maintaining and strengthening both its competitiveness and its contribution to the Greek economy. The main points of the roadmap set by the Attica prefecture for the strengthening of recycling in general and the transition to a circular economy are:

  • Application of separate collection of waste streams per material
  • Enhance remunerative recycling and establish a guarantee return system on bottles (plastic and glass)
  • Intensification of information campaigns
  • Strengthening waste collection and treatment infrastructure
  • Application of circular economy criteria in public procurement
  • Strengthening of electronic systems and control mechanisms
  • Incentives and sanctions in municipalities
  • Studies and application of chemical recycling technologies of plastics and other innovative solutions

The strategic planning for circular economy and the management of plastic waste of the Attica prefecture will be the central pillar that will be followed by all other regions of Greece.

The management of plastics and the “actions” of the Attica prefecture

Sustainability has become perhaps the most critical issue facing the plastics industry and is reaching an unprecedented level of global – public, corporate and governmental – awareness and concern. From a value chain perspective, plastics producers, processors, brand owners and the financial community all have an interest in playing an active role.

Giorgos Patoulis, Regional Governon of Attica

The plastics and chemical industries are under increasing public scrutiny due to the accumulated plastic waste in the ocean from their uncontrolled release into rivers and oceans, especially in Southeast Asia. Various scientific reports of microplastics entering the biological food chain raise further concerns for the public. The impact of uncontrolled plastic waste management after initial use is eroding the public image of chemicals and may even cause “social authorization”.

Simply put, the future of the plastics industry and its “social license” is based on how stakeholders respond.

The challenges are huge as the full development of the three critical corners of the plastic recycling triangle – collection / sorting, processing, and end-use application – remains in early development. Today, many collection systems are under financial pressure and flooded with waste volumes of all materials (glass, plastic, paper).

European Targets 2030

Sustainability goals, when set, are often without a fundamental understanding of the potential of existing infrastructure. For example, Europe, which is considered to be the most sustainable-advanced region on the planet, should substantially double its infrastructure capacity by adding around 300 recycling facilities and 300 for sorting, requiring around € 1.5 billion a year by 2026 for funding to achieve the goals it has set.

In particular, the strategy set by the European Union stipulates that all plastic packaging available on the EU market will either be reusable or can be recycled in a cost-effective manner. The main goal of the vision, however, predicts that by 2030 at least 55% of plastic waste produced in Europe will be recycled.

Greece Today

According to a recent study by IOBE, Greece ranks last among EU28 countries in terms of solid waste management as most solid waste is disposed of in landfills while reuse and recycling are extremely limited. Greece came second from the end in solid waste recycling in the European ranking for 2020.

Consequently, the Greek economy relies almost exclusively on prime, and in many cases imported, raw materials, resulting in a low ranking of cyclical indices, resulting in the loss of significant opportunities for the creation of domestic added value and employment

Finland – Plastics Recycling Example

In 2019 Neste Oil, the world’s leading provider of renewable diesel, renewable jet fuel, and an expert in delivering drop-in renewable chemical solutions, and Remondis, one of the world’s largest privately owned recycling, service and water companies, have signed an agreement to collaborate in the development of chemical recycling of plastic waste.

This collaboration will assist the Helsinki prefecture in achieving EU’s 2030 recycling targets. The goal of this partnership is to achieve the recycling / conversion of one million metric tons of plastics per year into chemical naphtha (which will be used to produce plastics) in the company’s refineries by 2030.

Attica Prefecture – Greece – Actions to Achieve the Recycling Objectives of the European Directives

The effort to transition to a form of circular economy is already at the heart of the strategic planning of the Attica prefecture. The region is already planning and implementing interventions so that plastic waste is converted into resources that can be utilized by the domestic plastics industry while maintaining and strengthening both its competitiveness and its contribution to the Greek economy. The main points of the roadmap set by the Attica prefecture for the strengthening of recycling in general and the transition to a circular economy are:

  • Application of separate collection of waste streams per material
  • Enhance remunerative recycling and establish a guarantee return system on bottles (plastic and glass)
  • Intensification of information campaigns
  • Strengthening waste collection and treatment infrastructure
  • Application of circular economy criteria in public procurement
  • Strengthening of electronic systems and control mechanisms
  • Incentives and sanctions in municipalities
  • Studies and application of chemical recycling technologies of plastics and other innovative solutions

The strategic planning for circular economy and the management of plastic waste of the Attica prefecture will be the central pillar that will be followed by all other regions of Greece.

The management of plastics and the “actions” of the Attica prefecture

Sustainability has become perhaps the most critical issue facing the plastics industry and is reaching an unprecedented level of global – public, corporate and governmental – awareness and concern. From a value chain perspective, plastics producers, processors, brand owners and the financial community all have an interest in playing an active role.

Giorgos Patoulis, Regional Governon of Attica

The plastics and chemical industries are under increasing public scrutiny due to the accumulated plastic waste in the ocean from their uncontrolled release into rivers and oceans, especially in Southeast Asia. Various scientific reports of microplastics entering the biological food chain raise further concerns for the public. The impact of uncontrolled plastic waste management after initial use is eroding the public image of chemicals and may even cause “social authorization”.

Simply put, the future of the plastics industry and its “social license” is based on how stakeholders respond.

The challenges are huge as the full development of the three critical corners of the plastic recycling triangle – collection / sorting, processing, and end-use application – remains in early development. Today, many collection systems are under financial pressure and flooded with waste volumes of all materials (glass, plastic, paper).

European Targets 2030

Sustainability goals, when set, are often without a fundamental understanding of the potential of existing infrastructure. For example, Europe, which is considered to be the most sustainable-advanced region on the planet, should substantially double its infrastructure capacity by adding around 300 recycling facilities and 300 for sorting, requiring around € 1.5 billion a year by 2026 for funding to achieve the goals it has set.

In particular, the strategy set by the European Union stipulates that all plastic packaging available on the EU market will either be reusable or can be recycled in a cost-effective manner. The main goal of the vision, however, predicts that by 2030 at least 55% of plastic waste produced in Europe will be recycled.

Greece Today

According to a recent study by IOBE, Greece ranks last among EU28 countries in terms of solid waste management as most solid waste is disposed of in landfills while reuse and recycling are extremely limited. Greece came second from the end in solid waste recycling in the European ranking for 2020.

Consequently, the Greek economy relies almost exclusively on prime, and in many cases imported, raw materials, resulting in a low ranking of cyclical indices, resulting in the loss of significant opportunities for the creation of domestic added value and employment

Finland – Plastics Recycling Example

In 2019 Neste Oil, the world’s leading provider of renewable diesel, renewable jet fuel, and an expert in delivering drop-in renewable chemical solutions, and Remondis, one of the world’s largest privately owned recycling, service and water companies, have signed an agreement to collaborate in the development of chemical recycling of plastic waste.

This collaboration will assist the Helsinki prefecture in achieving EU’s 2030 recycling targets. The goal of this partnership is to achieve the recycling / conversion of one million metric tons of plastics per year into chemical naphtha (which will be used to produce plastics) in the company’s refineries by 2030.

Attica Prefecture – Greece – Actions to Achieve the Recycling Objectives of the European Directives

The effort to transition to a form of circular economy is already at the heart of the strategic planning of the Attica prefecture. The region is already planning and implementing interventions so that plastic waste is converted into resources that can be utilized by the domestic plastics industry while maintaining and strengthening both its competitiveness and its contribution to the Greek economy. The main points of the roadmap set by the Attica prefecture for the strengthening of recycling in general and the transition to a circular economy are:

  • Application of separate collection of waste streams per material
  • Enhance remunerative recycling and establish a guarantee return system on bottles (plastic and glass)
  • Intensification of information campaigns
  • Strengthening waste collection and treatment infrastructure
  • Application of circular economy criteria in public procurement
  • Strengthening of electronic systems and control mechanisms
  • Incentives and sanctions in municipalities
  • Studies and application of chemical recycling technologies of plastics and other innovative solutions

The strategic planning for circular economy and the management of plastic waste of the Attica prefecture will be the central pillar that will be followed by all other regions of Greece.

PolyREC created to report on Europe’s plastics circularity

This will be achieved by using a common data collection system – Reco Trace. PolyREC will ensure traceability, transparency, and trust in recycled materials along the entire plastics value chain. PolyREC will use Vinyl Plus’ 20 years’ experience and expertise that it has in becoming the industry standard for collecting credible and reliable recycling data via its data collection vehicle Recovinyl. Vinyl Plus’ Managing Director Brigitte Dero says: “circularity of plastics is a key opportunity to enhance plastics products sustainability. The European PVC industry, through VinylPlus, has learnt the importance of monitoring and progress reporting. We are therefore pleased to share this long-time experience and work collaboratively with all plastic industry sectors to raise traceability and transparency in recycled plastics along the entire plastics value chain.”

PolyREC comes at a time where monitoring polymers circularity is paramount, especially in the context of the Circular Plastics Alliance (CPA). This system will be able to fulfil the CPA objectives, legislative traceability demands, and industry wide plastic recycling pledges. PRE’s President, Ton Emans, elaborated by saying that “setting up mechanisms that evidence progress in driving plastic circularity in a transparent manner is a must if we are to meet the EU targets”.

Emans continued that “today’s announcement by the plastics value chain covering recyclers, raw material producers, and converters is a significant step towards a credible and systemic approach to genuinely improve plastic production, collection, and recycling. This mutual approach to data collection is indispensable to measure the industry’s advancement while using the same yardstick”.

Petcore Europe’s Managing Director Christian Crépet announced that as “Petcore Europe has been pioneering the monitoring of PET recycling in Europe since the 1990’s, its participation into a joint monitoring recycled plastics scheme for the EU is both timely and logical”.

“We are very pleased to join forces with key plastic value chain partners in setting up this unique cross-polymer monitoring system while benefiting from the longstanding and proven Recovinyl system. Capitalising on our solid experience in providing key figures of the European plastic industry, we see this as a key milestone in our journey towards circular plastics.”, added Virginia Janssens, Plastics Europe Managing Director.

PolyREC created to report on Europe’s plastics circularity

This will be achieved by using a common data collection system – Reco Trace. PolyREC will ensure traceability, transparency, and trust in recycled materials along the entire plastics value chain. PolyREC will use Vinyl Plus’ 20 years’ experience and expertise that it has in becoming the industry standard for collecting credible and reliable recycling data via its data collection vehicle Recovinyl. Vinyl Plus’ Managing Director Brigitte Dero says: “circularity of plastics is a key opportunity to enhance plastics products sustainability. The European PVC industry, through VinylPlus, has learnt the importance of monitoring and progress reporting. We are therefore pleased to share this long-time experience and work collaboratively with all plastic industry sectors to raise traceability and transparency in recycled plastics along the entire plastics value chain.”

PolyREC comes at a time where monitoring polymers circularity is paramount, especially in the context of the Circular Plastics Alliance (CPA). This system will be able to fulfil the CPA objectives, legislative traceability demands, and industry wide plastic recycling pledges. PRE’s President, Ton Emans, elaborated by saying that “setting up mechanisms that evidence progress in driving plastic circularity in a transparent manner is a must if we are to meet the EU targets”.

Emans continued that “today’s announcement by the plastics value chain covering recyclers, raw material producers, and converters is a significant step towards a credible and systemic approach to genuinely improve plastic production, collection, and recycling. This mutual approach to data collection is indispensable to measure the industry’s advancement while using the same yardstick”.

Petcore Europe’s Managing Director Christian Crépet announced that as “Petcore Europe has been pioneering the monitoring of PET recycling in Europe since the 1990’s, its participation into a joint monitoring recycled plastics scheme for the EU is both timely and logical”.

“We are very pleased to join forces with key plastic value chain partners in setting up this unique cross-polymer monitoring system while benefiting from the longstanding and proven Recovinyl system. Capitalising on our solid experience in providing key figures of the European plastic industry, we see this as a key milestone in our journey towards circular plastics.”, added Virginia Janssens, Plastics Europe Managing Director.