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Politics

FEAD welcomes the updated EU Industrial Strategy

FEAD welcomes the strategy which has been revised to reflect the post-covid era. We now have great expectations this Industrial Strategy will be working towards facilitating and strengthening a fair and open EU single market.

  • The Industrial Strategy reiterates that enhancing circular economy and increasing the collection and recycling of raw materials, as well as strengthening the market for secondary raw materials are crucial instruments in boosting the green transition and accomplishing the European Green Deal targets and objectives.
  • We consider it a positive sign that the EC identifies the strategic dependencies in the areas of raw materials, batteries, and energy, as we share the same concerns, and we also bring solutions. The EU Industrial Strategy should encompass a holistic approach towards closing the loop in energy, by recognising the beneficial role of the recovery of energy from waste, which is partially a renewable source.
  • The EU industrial Strategy also needs a smoother functioning of waste shipments rules, as intra-EU waste movements are essential to the whole waste management chain which is largely cross-border.
  • FEAD supports the need to accelerate both the green and the digital transitions. Under the fit-for-55 package, the EU ETS should prioritise large emissions caused by the material and energy content of products/energy processes. It should not include, however, Waste-to- Energy activities which are integral to the circular economy, and account for only 1,5% of the total EU CO2 emissions, while having the capacity to avoid yearly 120 Mt in 2030 with energy generated from waste.
  • Ambitious policies including mandatory recycled contents in packaging and in a series of other products are crucial to trigger more investments along the recycling chain, transforming the manufacturing sector into a circular model. The SUP Directive and the recently proposed Regulation on Batteries are very positive examples of such decisive evolutions by the EU legislator, and to which FEAD is a proponent.

    These tools are all indispensable when dealing with challenging sectors in the whole value chain and will help achieve the ambitious targets for a green transition.

Making textiles circular: What is needed?

fter the opening speech of Mariska Zandvliet, President of EuRIC Textiles, Maria Rincon Live, Policy Officer at the European Commission, DG Environment, Circular Economy and Green Growth, Sustainable Production, Products and Consumption highlighted some major takeaways to make textiles more circular. She mentioned that strong focus needs to be placed on eco-design, investments as well as a collaboration throughout the textile value chain and also the need to provide alternatives to tackle the current linear textile model. Delara BURKHARDT, Member of the European Parliament joined the keynote session to stress the necessity for a holistic circular economy approach and the fact that textiles are “our second skin” and need particular attention.

Moving to the panel discussion, Jonas Der-Hansen, Public Affairs Director at Global Fashion Agenda, called for a systematic change and a new and proper legal framework for textiles while Valeria Botta, Program Manager at ECOS, focused on the fact that it is essential to empower consumers to move to a circular economy for textiles and to prolonging the useful life of textile products.

Emmanuel Katrakis, Secretary General, wrapped up the debate by highlighting EuRIC’s vision of an ambitious EU Textiles Strategy which should include proper EPR schemes, recycled content targets as well as a close collaboration across the textiles value chain.
You couldn’t join? Don’t worry, the recording of the webinar will be published in the framework of eREC on 7th May from 09:15 to 11:00 AM CEST. The video will be also uploaded to eREC’s YouTube channel in the coming days.

Petcore launches roadmap to pave way to full circularity

PET is 100% recyclable and is the most recycled plastic packaging material in Europe. PET is used in everyday products like food and drink and PPE equipment in the fight against covid-19. PET is easily identified on products by the ‘number 1’ recycling symbol. Pecore Europe and its members are encouraging citizens to “Recycle the 1” and urge European legislators to put in place a regulatory framework which ensures EU targets can be met.

Achieving our ambition to build a fully circular economy will be a collaborative effort, requiring industry and legislators to work hand in hand. The review of the Packaging and Packaging Waste Directive provides a concrete opportunity for legislators to take serious steps towards achieving full circularity. This can be done by supporting recyclers to achieve higher recycling rates and banning the landfilling and incineration of PET bottles.

To reach the EU’s 90% collection target for recyclable plastic bottles by 2029, a smart waste management system at the EU-level is needed. Deposit Return Schemes (DRS) and segregated curb side PET collection schemes are examples of the systems we need to recycle all PET, close the loop and eliminate plastic waste. The European PET value chain is equipped for increased collection and currently has spare capacity to recycle over 11 billion more bottles a year. By enabling an EU-wide smart waste management system, more bottles can be collected for recycling.
Demonstrating good separation practices and promoting the importance of correct recycling is a key cornerstone of reaching both collection and recycling targets.

Petcore Europe is committed to developing a pan-European consumer campaign – beginning initially in France and Germany – which aims to empower consumers to recycle PET packaging and help contribute to achieving a fully circular economy and closed-loop system. The campaign will provide key resources to aid the consumer in understanding how to recycle PET packaging better and build greater trust in the recycling system.

Roadmap

Petcore launches roadmap to pave way to full circularity

PET is 100% recyclable and is the most recycled plastic packaging material in Europe. PET is used in everyday products like food and drink and PPE equipment in the fight against covid-19. PET is easily identified on products by the ‘number 1’ recycling symbol. Pecore Europe and its members are encouraging citizens to “Recycle the 1” and urge European legislators to put in place a regulatory framework which ensures EU targets can be met.

Achieving our ambition to build a fully circular economy will be a collaborative effort, requiring industry and legislators to work hand in hand. The review of the Packaging and Packaging Waste Directive provides a concrete opportunity for legislators to take serious steps towards achieving full circularity. This can be done by supporting recyclers to achieve higher recycling rates and banning the landfilling and incineration of PET bottles.

To reach the EU’s 90% collection target for recyclable plastic bottles by 2029, a smart waste management system at the EU-level is needed. Deposit Return Schemes (DRS) and segregated curb side PET collection schemes are examples of the systems we need to recycle all PET, close the loop and eliminate plastic waste. The European PET value chain is equipped for increased collection and currently has spare capacity to recycle over 11 billion more bottles a year. By enabling an EU-wide smart waste management system, more bottles can be collected for recycling.
Demonstrating good separation practices and promoting the importance of correct recycling is a key cornerstone of reaching both collection and recycling targets.

Petcore Europe is committed to developing a pan-European consumer campaign – beginning initially in France and Germany – which aims to empower consumers to recycle PET packaging and help contribute to achieving a fully circular economy and closed-loop system. The campaign will provide key resources to aid the consumer in understanding how to recycle PET packaging better and build greater trust in the recycling system.

Roadmap

Petcore launches roadmap to pave way to full circularity

PET is 100% recyclable and is the most recycled plastic packaging material in Europe. PET is used in everyday products like food and drink and PPE equipment in the fight against covid-19. PET is easily identified on products by the ‘number 1’ recycling symbol. Pecore Europe and its members are encouraging citizens to “Recycle the 1” and urge European legislators to put in place a regulatory framework which ensures EU targets can be met.

Achieving our ambition to build a fully circular economy will be a collaborative effort, requiring industry and legislators to work hand in hand. The review of the Packaging and Packaging Waste Directive provides a concrete opportunity for legislators to take serious steps towards achieving full circularity. This can be done by supporting recyclers to achieve higher recycling rates and banning the landfilling and incineration of PET bottles.

To reach the EU’s 90% collection target for recyclable plastic bottles by 2029, a smart waste management system at the EU-level is needed. Deposit Return Schemes (DRS) and segregated curb side PET collection schemes are examples of the systems we need to recycle all PET, close the loop and eliminate plastic waste. The European PET value chain is equipped for increased collection and currently has spare capacity to recycle over 11 billion more bottles a year. By enabling an EU-wide smart waste management system, more bottles can be collected for recycling.
Demonstrating good separation practices and promoting the importance of correct recycling is a key cornerstone of reaching both collection and recycling targets.

Petcore Europe is committed to developing a pan-European consumer campaign – beginning initially in France and Germany – which aims to empower consumers to recycle PET packaging and help contribute to achieving a fully circular economy and closed-loop system. The campaign will provide key resources to aid the consumer in understanding how to recycle PET packaging better and build greater trust in the recycling system.

Roadmap

WTE has still a place in the EU Taxonomy

In the wake of the publication of the first Delegated Act, the European Suppliers of Waste-to-Energy Technology (ESWET) reaffirm their support to the EU Taxonomy as an important tool towards a carbon-neutral Europe. On a positive note, we welcome the inclusion of anaerobic digestion in the first Delegated Act of the Taxonomy. The Platform on Sustainable Finance rightly recognised the role played by this Waste-to-Energy technology in reducing landfills and related methane emissions.

However, the Delegated Act fails to reflect a comprehensive approach for waste management. While prevention, reuse and recycling of waste should remain the priority of any policy, technologies like Waste-to-Energy need support for the service they provide in safely manage non-recyclable waste.

“We believe that, following the request made in March 2020 by the Technical Expert Group on sustainable finance (TEG), the Platform on sustainable finance should have considered the role of Waste-to-Energy in the Taxonomy” commented Patrick Clerens, ESWET Secretary-General.

This call has been echoed by trade associations across several sectors, which invited the Platform to consider Waste-to-Energy’s contribution to the climate and circular economy goals. The need to address this question has been also highlighted by a PWC’s legal analysis of Waste-to-Energy in the Taxonomy.

But today, the Taxonomy still overlooks the environmental impact of non-recyclable waste, when many EU Member States landfill more than 40% of their waste, and waste generation is increasing in Europe for a third year in a row.

Thus, ESWET calls for the Commission to foster a technology-neutral and open discussion on Waste-to-Energy in the context of its work on the second Delegated Act, in order to assess under what conditions Waste-to-Energy can contribute to the circular economy and pollution prevention.

WTE has still a place in the EU Taxonomy

In the wake of the publication of the first Delegated Act, the European Suppliers of Waste-to-Energy Technology (ESWET) reaffirm their support to the EU Taxonomy as an important tool towards a carbon-neutral Europe. On a positive note, we welcome the inclusion of anaerobic digestion in the first Delegated Act of the Taxonomy. The Platform on Sustainable Finance rightly recognised the role played by this Waste-to-Energy technology in reducing landfills and related methane emissions.

However, the Delegated Act fails to reflect a comprehensive approach for waste management. While prevention, reuse and recycling of waste should remain the priority of any policy, technologies like Waste-to-Energy need support for the service they provide in safely manage non-recyclable waste.

“We believe that, following the request made in March 2020 by the Technical Expert Group on sustainable finance (TEG), the Platform on sustainable finance should have considered the role of Waste-to-Energy in the Taxonomy” commented Patrick Clerens, ESWET Secretary-General.

This call has been echoed by trade associations across several sectors, which invited the Platform to consider Waste-to-Energy’s contribution to the climate and circular economy goals. The need to address this question has been also highlighted by a PWC’s legal analysis of Waste-to-Energy in the Taxonomy.

But today, the Taxonomy still overlooks the environmental impact of non-recyclable waste, when many EU Member States landfill more than 40% of their waste, and waste generation is increasing in Europe for a third year in a row.

Thus, ESWET calls for the Commission to foster a technology-neutral and open discussion on Waste-to-Energy in the context of its work on the second Delegated Act, in order to assess under what conditions Waste-to-Energy can contribute to the circular economy and pollution prevention.

WTE has still a place in the EU Taxonomy

In the wake of the publication of the first Delegated Act, the European Suppliers of Waste-to-Energy Technology (ESWET) reaffirm their support to the EU Taxonomy as an important tool towards a carbon-neutral Europe. On a positive note, we welcome the inclusion of anaerobic digestion in the first Delegated Act of the Taxonomy. The Platform on Sustainable Finance rightly recognised the role played by this Waste-to-Energy technology in reducing landfills and related methane emissions.

However, the Delegated Act fails to reflect a comprehensive approach for waste management. While prevention, reuse and recycling of waste should remain the priority of any policy, technologies like Waste-to-Energy need support for the service they provide in safely manage non-recyclable waste.

“We believe that, following the request made in March 2020 by the Technical Expert Group on sustainable finance (TEG), the Platform on sustainable finance should have considered the role of Waste-to-Energy in the Taxonomy” commented Patrick Clerens, ESWET Secretary-General.

This call has been echoed by trade associations across several sectors, which invited the Platform to consider Waste-to-Energy’s contribution to the climate and circular economy goals. The need to address this question has been also highlighted by a PWC’s legal analysis of Waste-to-Energy in the Taxonomy.

But today, the Taxonomy still overlooks the environmental impact of non-recyclable waste, when many EU Member States landfill more than 40% of their waste, and waste generation is increasing in Europe for a third year in a row.

Thus, ESWET calls for the Commission to foster a technology-neutral and open discussion on Waste-to-Energy in the context of its work on the second Delegated Act, in order to assess under what conditions Waste-to-Energy can contribute to the circular economy and pollution prevention.

EuRIC welcomes provisional agreement on European Climate Law

For instance, as highlighted in the Top 5 priorities of the recycling industry, ferrous metals recycling saves the equivalent of 58% of CO2 emissions when compared with primary steel using iron ore. That percentage raises to 70% for PET, 89% for packaging HDPE, 93% for aluminium and 98% for textiles recycling. Using recovered paper instead of primary materials saves 70% for paper and 77% for cardboard of the energy needed to produce new paper. Last but not least, tyre recycling into rubber granulates saves 58,4% of CO2 when compared with end-of-life tyre’s co-incineration and can reach 95% of carbon footprint reductions when compared to those of virgin materials substituted.

Emmanuel Katrakis, Secretary General of EuRIC said: “We are pleased to see such an ambitious agreement which will eventually lead to a binding legislation in the EU. The recycling industry is inherently resource and climate efficient. As we strive to reach the targets set in the European Green Deal, Circular Economy Action Plan and now, the new European Climate Law, the European recycling industry is committed to keep contributing its share to bring the EU on an even greener path”.

EuRIC is devoted to bridge the circular economy with climate policies and to advocate the benefits of recycling in reaching the ambitious targets of the European Climate Law. “We look forward to do our part to combat climate change today, on Earth Day, and every day”, Katrakis concluded.

EuRIC welcomes provisional agreement on European Climate Law

For instance, as highlighted in the Top 5 priorities of the recycling industry, ferrous metals recycling saves the equivalent of 58% of CO2 emissions when compared with primary steel using iron ore. That percentage raises to 70% for PET, 89% for packaging HDPE, 93% for aluminium and 98% for textiles recycling. Using recovered paper instead of primary materials saves 70% for paper and 77% for cardboard of the energy needed to produce new paper. Last but not least, tyre recycling into rubber granulates saves 58,4% of CO2 when compared with end-of-life tyre’s co-incineration and can reach 95% of carbon footprint reductions when compared to those of virgin materials substituted.

Emmanuel Katrakis, Secretary General of EuRIC said: “We are pleased to see such an ambitious agreement which will eventually lead to a binding legislation in the EU. The recycling industry is inherently resource and climate efficient. As we strive to reach the targets set in the European Green Deal, Circular Economy Action Plan and now, the new European Climate Law, the European recycling industry is committed to keep contributing its share to bring the EU on an even greener path”.

EuRIC is devoted to bridge the circular economy with climate policies and to advocate the benefits of recycling in reaching the ambitious targets of the European Climate Law. “We look forward to do our part to combat climate change today, on Earth Day, and every day”, Katrakis concluded.