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Politics

EuRIC calls upon the Commission to support continued use of tyre-derived granular infill

With the release of ECHA´s opinions on infill materials, now it is up to the Commission to take a decision on what measures to follow as regards this application.

EuRIC warns about the negative impacts that some of the options covered, including a complete ban, may have on the environment and on the objectives of speeding the transition towards a more circular economy.

EuRIC has raised concerns over the future of 527,000 tonnes of end-of-life tyres annually recycled into artificial turfs, warning on the risks of them being mismanaged and causing a huge environmental impact in the event of a proposal to ban infill materials.

EuRIC Mechanical Tyre Recycling Branch (EuRIC MTR) has expressed its support to the objectives of the European Commission, and it is confident that preventing a mismanagement of waste tyres will be at the focal point of their decision when taking into consideration the different options proposed by ECHA. Especially, knowing that there are no alternatives for an environmental sound management of the approximately 50,000,000 tyres units annually recycled and turned into infill material.

Yet, preserving a circular economy for tyre recycling into artificial turf infill can and must go hand in hand with reducing microplastics’ releases through standardized risk management measures such as those described in the European Standards Committee (CEN) technical report CEN/TR 17519.

“State of the art mechanical tyre recycling entirely supports the European Green Deal and the new Circular Economy Action Plan” stressed Poul Steen Rasmussen, President of EuRIC MTR Branch and Group CEO Genan. “The processing of ELT tyres into rubber is not only the most resource-efficient option but also the most climate-efficient one because for each tonne of ELT recycled as infill for artificial turf pitches- the climate is spared 700 kg of CO2 when compared with co-incineration” he added.

EuRIC entirely supports the efforts of the European Commission to minimise the release of microplastics in the environment.

“We are sure that cutting down microplastics releases into environment and the circular economy goals can coexist and achieve the objective of minimising the environmental impact of microplastics, which is why we encourage the European Commission to introduce risk management measures to avoid unintended releases of microplastics into the environment, one of the options assessed by ECHA.”

EuRIC has expressed their support towards the sustainable recycling system of end-of-life-tyres which they define as “well-functioning and mature circular value chain which directly contributes to the recovery of thousands of tonnes of critical raw materials such as rubber, and also steel and textile fibers, saving substantial amounts of energy and water, and preventing greenhouse gas emissions. Together with millions of euros saved in imports of raw materials and generating thousands of jobs”.

FEAD participates in the European Parliament hearing on plastics

Waste management activities are integral to circular industrial chains and have a crucial role to play to ensure the circularity of our economies. The European private waste management sector, represented by FEAD, has a clear understanding of the environmental, health, and economic impacts of plastics and microplastics. Plastic waste will remain a reality despite proposed measures to limit the relentless increase of plastic production and consumption. FEAD strongly advocates to have a regulatory framework at EU level that would result in a sound management of plastic waste. In particular, we emphasise the following:

  • The current use of excessive virgin plastic needs to be replaced by a circular model, whereby plastics already introduced into the economy are reused through recycling and recovery;
  • Mandatory recycled content in priority sectors (packaging, automotive, construction products), and green public procurement rules can ensure a strong and long-lasting demand and boost the market for plastic recyclates. The rules on Eco-design play a key role in the recyclability of plastic products, because they stipulate the avoidance or limitation of additives and hazardous substances from the very start of the product value chain;
  • Closing the plastic loop within the EU is dependent on safe and efficient intra-EU waste shipment rules and on greater law enforcement efforts preventing illegal exports and waste crime;
  • To stop the leakage of plastic waste and consequently of microplastics we need to have a better collection and separation system and improve recycling rates. Biodegradable and bio-based plastics are not necessarily a solution, depending upon their impact on the environment, as most plastics do not degrade, but cause litter and end up in smaller pieces.

    Peter Kurth, FEAD’s President states: “A recent study for the European Parliament showed that € 630 million is spent every year across Europe to clean plastic waste from coasts and beaches while the failure to recycle costs the European economy € 105 billion. This is evidence that tells us that collecting, recycling, recovering is the only solution moving forward. Over the next 10 years, our industry is ready to invest € 10 billion in plastic collection and recycling facilities, provided there is enough economic viability in the uptake of plastic recyclates. Pull measures, such as mandatory recycled contents and green public procurement, are needed to create a true shock on demand for recyclates. Large scale and appropriate funding for selective collection and sorting is vital. And finally, safe exports are also crucial to ship plastic waste to places where they will be further treated and reprocessed.”

FEAD participates in the European Parliament hearing on plastics

Waste management activities are integral to circular industrial chains and have a crucial role to play to ensure the circularity of our economies. The European private waste management sector, represented by FEAD, has a clear understanding of the environmental, health, and economic impacts of plastics and microplastics. Plastic waste will remain a reality despite proposed measures to limit the relentless increase of plastic production and consumption. FEAD strongly advocates to have a regulatory framework at EU level that would result in a sound management of plastic waste. In particular, we emphasise the following:

  • The current use of excessive virgin plastic needs to be replaced by a circular model, whereby plastics already introduced into the economy are reused through recycling and recovery;
  • Mandatory recycled content in priority sectors (packaging, automotive, construction products), and green public procurement rules can ensure a strong and long-lasting demand and boost the market for plastic recyclates. The rules on Eco-design play a key role in the recyclability of plastic products, because they stipulate the avoidance or limitation of additives and hazardous substances from the very start of the product value chain;
  • Closing the plastic loop within the EU is dependent on safe and efficient intra-EU waste shipment rules and on greater law enforcement efforts preventing illegal exports and waste crime;
  • To stop the leakage of plastic waste and consequently of microplastics we need to have a better collection and separation system and improve recycling rates. Biodegradable and bio-based plastics are not necessarily a solution, depending upon their impact on the environment, as most plastics do not degrade, but cause litter and end up in smaller pieces.

    Peter Kurth, FEAD’s President states: “A recent study for the European Parliament showed that € 630 million is spent every year across Europe to clean plastic waste from coasts and beaches while the failure to recycle costs the European economy € 105 billion. This is evidence that tells us that collecting, recycling, recovering is the only solution moving forward. Over the next 10 years, our industry is ready to invest € 10 billion in plastic collection and recycling facilities, provided there is enough economic viability in the uptake of plastic recyclates. Pull measures, such as mandatory recycled contents and green public procurement, are needed to create a true shock on demand for recyclates. Large scale and appropriate funding for selective collection and sorting is vital. And finally, safe exports are also crucial to ship plastic waste to places where they will be further treated and reprocessed.”

FEAD participates in the European Parliament hearing on plastics

Waste management activities are integral to circular industrial chains and have a crucial role to play to ensure the circularity of our economies. The European private waste management sector, represented by FEAD, has a clear understanding of the environmental, health, and economic impacts of plastics and microplastics. Plastic waste will remain a reality despite proposed measures to limit the relentless increase of plastic production and consumption. FEAD strongly advocates to have a regulatory framework at EU level that would result in a sound management of plastic waste. In particular, we emphasise the following:

  • The current use of excessive virgin plastic needs to be replaced by a circular model, whereby plastics already introduced into the economy are reused through recycling and recovery;
  • Mandatory recycled content in priority sectors (packaging, automotive, construction products), and green public procurement rules can ensure a strong and long-lasting demand and boost the market for plastic recyclates. The rules on Eco-design play a key role in the recyclability of plastic products, because they stipulate the avoidance or limitation of additives and hazardous substances from the very start of the product value chain;
  • Closing the plastic loop within the EU is dependent on safe and efficient intra-EU waste shipment rules and on greater law enforcement efforts preventing illegal exports and waste crime;
  • To stop the leakage of plastic waste and consequently of microplastics we need to have a better collection and separation system and improve recycling rates. Biodegradable and bio-based plastics are not necessarily a solution, depending upon their impact on the environment, as most plastics do not degrade, but cause litter and end up in smaller pieces.

    Peter Kurth, FEAD’s President states: “A recent study for the European Parliament showed that € 630 million is spent every year across Europe to clean plastic waste from coasts and beaches while the failure to recycle costs the European economy € 105 billion. This is evidence that tells us that collecting, recycling, recovering is the only solution moving forward. Over the next 10 years, our industry is ready to invest € 10 billion in plastic collection and recycling facilities, provided there is enough economic viability in the uptake of plastic recyclates. Pull measures, such as mandatory recycled contents and green public procurement, are needed to create a true shock on demand for recyclates. Large scale and appropriate funding for selective collection and sorting is vital. And finally, safe exports are also crucial to ship plastic waste to places where they will be further treated and reprocessed.”

Public Sector to make greater use of secondary raw materials

Among other things, it provides for stronger ecologically oriented public procurement with mandatory minimum criteria, for example in the construction industry. For the European network EUROSLAG and the FEhS Building Materials Institute, this is an important step towards a comprehensive approval of secondary building materials and their conditional prioritisation in public procurement tenders. For this to happen, however, European public procurement law must be amended, as a legal opinion by the law firm Kopp-Assenmacher & Nusser, commissioned by the two Duisburg institutions in 2020, found.

Thomas Reiche, Chairman at EUROSLAG and Managing Director of the FEhS Institute, now sees the ball in the European Commission’s court: “The own-initiative report provides the best foundation for binding, forward-looking legislation to consistently promote the circular economy. This also includes fair competition and the conditional prioritisation of secondary raw materials, as also demanded by the rapporteur of the European Parliament Jan Huitema. Only concrete procurement directives with third-party protection character ensure the Europe-wide use of all high-quality secondary building materials, which have been making an important contribution to ecologically and economically sound economic activity for decades!”

The European Parliament’s own-initiative report, under the lead of the Environment Committee, has adopted numerous demands based on the EU’s Circular Economy Action Plan of March 2020. These include the promotion of resource efficiency, the Ecodesign Directive for products and green public procurement. Plans for the construction industry include specifications for the use of secondary raw materials and recycling. The Parliament’s proposals serve as a template for legislation by the European Commission.

Public Sector to make greater use of secondary raw materials

Among other things, it provides for stronger ecologically oriented public procurement with mandatory minimum criteria, for example in the construction industry. For the European network EUROSLAG and the FEhS Building Materials Institute, this is an important step towards a comprehensive approval of secondary building materials and their conditional prioritisation in public procurement tenders. For this to happen, however, European public procurement law must be amended, as a legal opinion by the law firm Kopp-Assenmacher & Nusser, commissioned by the two Duisburg institutions in 2020, found.

Thomas Reiche, Chairman at EUROSLAG and Managing Director of the FEhS Institute, now sees the ball in the European Commission’s court: “The own-initiative report provides the best foundation for binding, forward-looking legislation to consistently promote the circular economy. This also includes fair competition and the conditional prioritisation of secondary raw materials, as also demanded by the rapporteur of the European Parliament Jan Huitema. Only concrete procurement directives with third-party protection character ensure the Europe-wide use of all high-quality secondary building materials, which have been making an important contribution to ecologically and economically sound economic activity for decades!”

The European Parliament’s own-initiative report, under the lead of the Environment Committee, has adopted numerous demands based on the EU’s Circular Economy Action Plan of March 2020. These include the promotion of resource efficiency, the Ecodesign Directive for products and green public procurement. Plans for the construction industry include specifications for the use of secondary raw materials and recycling. The Parliament’s proposals serve as a template for legislation by the European Commission.

Public Sector to make greater use of secondary raw materials

Among other things, it provides for stronger ecologically oriented public procurement with mandatory minimum criteria, for example in the construction industry. For the European network EUROSLAG and the FEhS Building Materials Institute, this is an important step towards a comprehensive approval of secondary building materials and their conditional prioritisation in public procurement tenders. For this to happen, however, European public procurement law must be amended, as a legal opinion by the law firm Kopp-Assenmacher & Nusser, commissioned by the two Duisburg institutions in 2020, found.

Thomas Reiche, Chairman at EUROSLAG and Managing Director of the FEhS Institute, now sees the ball in the European Commission’s court: “The own-initiative report provides the best foundation for binding, forward-looking legislation to consistently promote the circular economy. This also includes fair competition and the conditional prioritisation of secondary raw materials, as also demanded by the rapporteur of the European Parliament Jan Huitema. Only concrete procurement directives with third-party protection character ensure the Europe-wide use of all high-quality secondary building materials, which have been making an important contribution to ecologically and economically sound economic activity for decades!”

The European Parliament’s own-initiative report, under the lead of the Environment Committee, has adopted numerous demands based on the EU’s Circular Economy Action Plan of March 2020. These include the promotion of resource efficiency, the Ecodesign Directive for products and green public procurement. Plans for the construction industry include specifications for the use of secondary raw materials and recycling. The Parliament’s proposals serve as a template for legislation by the European Commission.

APEAL announces 2025 vision for recycling

The 2025 Vision is set to be supported by action in four key areas, identified by the Association as critical in the drive to prevent steel packaging being diverted from recycling and wasted.

Alexis Van Maercke, secretary general of APEAL, said: “The four key areas of action will include a focus on optimising separate waste collection, establishing a scrap quality standard, the collection and sorting of steel closures, and designing for recyclability.
“As APEAL’s recycling report published in 2018 illustrates, separate collection is the best way of guaranteeing high-quality input into recycling operations. It was therefore encouraging to see this highlighted in the Circular Economy Action Plan (CEAP) 2.0 report adopted by the European Parliament last 9th February.

“Establishing a scrap quality standard is equally important. Crucially, to maintain quality in the steel for packaging scrap value chain, quality control must start when the material is at the sorting facility. This can only be achieved by establishing a quality standard for packaging steel scrap.”

Whilst an average of 82,5% of all steel packaging is currently recycled across Europe, the collection and sorting of steel closures in Europe is estimated to be below-average, with steel closures regularly put in the wrong waste bin (and often in the residual waste bin) by citizens.

Mr Van Maercke continued: “Improving the recycling rate of steel closures will make a significant contribution in the drive towards zero steel packaging to landfill. But there is currently a lack of clear sorting instructions and low awareness among citizens. At the same time ineffective sorting techniques in a number of facilities result in collected steel closures being lost and not recycled.”

APEAL also believes designing for recyclability will underpin the successful implementation of all these measures, helping to ensure that every product placed on the market, can be recycled as efficiently as possible.

“Ultimately, steel packaging is a valuable resource which cannot be wasted if we are to achieve the objectives of the European Green Deal. APEAL will continue to work with its colleagues, the European Commission, European Parliament, Member States and all stakeholders to realise a shared ambition of a truly circular economy.”

A new APEAL report, ‘Why Steel recycles forever – How to collect, sort & recycle steel for packaging’, designed to help stakeholders throughout the value chain work collaboratively to achieve the 2025 Vision, is set to be published in December 2021.

At the same time, APEAL will reveal a new recycling rate objective in line with the new EU calculation methodology. Applicable for data from 2020, this new methodology moves the calculation point for all members states and all packaging materials, to the entrance of the recycling operation. This means that no impurities can be included and only materials that are really recycled can be included in the measurement process.

Mr Van Maercke added: “Indeed, APEAL will release the 2019 steel recycling rate in May this year. But towards the end of the year we aim to be the first material to release our figures with the new methodology.”

APEAL announces 2025 vision for recycling

The 2025 Vision is set to be supported by action in four key areas, identified by the Association as critical in the drive to prevent steel packaging being diverted from recycling and wasted.

Alexis Van Maercke, secretary general of APEAL, said: “The four key areas of action will include a focus on optimising separate waste collection, establishing a scrap quality standard, the collection and sorting of steel closures, and designing for recyclability.
“As APEAL’s recycling report published in 2018 illustrates, separate collection is the best way of guaranteeing high-quality input into recycling operations. It was therefore encouraging to see this highlighted in the Circular Economy Action Plan (CEAP) 2.0 report adopted by the European Parliament last 9th February.

“Establishing a scrap quality standard is equally important. Crucially, to maintain quality in the steel for packaging scrap value chain, quality control must start when the material is at the sorting facility. This can only be achieved by establishing a quality standard for packaging steel scrap.”

Whilst an average of 82,5% of all steel packaging is currently recycled across Europe, the collection and sorting of steel closures in Europe is estimated to be below-average, with steel closures regularly put in the wrong waste bin (and often in the residual waste bin) by citizens.

Mr Van Maercke continued: “Improving the recycling rate of steel closures will make a significant contribution in the drive towards zero steel packaging to landfill. But there is currently a lack of clear sorting instructions and low awareness among citizens. At the same time ineffective sorting techniques in a number of facilities result in collected steel closures being lost and not recycled.”

APEAL also believes designing for recyclability will underpin the successful implementation of all these measures, helping to ensure that every product placed on the market, can be recycled as efficiently as possible.

“Ultimately, steel packaging is a valuable resource which cannot be wasted if we are to achieve the objectives of the European Green Deal. APEAL will continue to work with its colleagues, the European Commission, European Parliament, Member States and all stakeholders to realise a shared ambition of a truly circular economy.”

A new APEAL report, ‘Why Steel recycles forever – How to collect, sort & recycle steel for packaging’, designed to help stakeholders throughout the value chain work collaboratively to achieve the 2025 Vision, is set to be published in December 2021.

At the same time, APEAL will reveal a new recycling rate objective in line with the new EU calculation methodology. Applicable for data from 2020, this new methodology moves the calculation point for all members states and all packaging materials, to the entrance of the recycling operation. This means that no impurities can be included and only materials that are really recycled can be included in the measurement process.

Mr Van Maercke added: “Indeed, APEAL will release the 2019 steel recycling rate in May this year. But towards the end of the year we aim to be the first material to release our figures with the new methodology.”

APEAL announces 2025 vision for recycling

The 2025 Vision is set to be supported by action in four key areas, identified by the Association as critical in the drive to prevent steel packaging being diverted from recycling and wasted.

Alexis Van Maercke, secretary general of APEAL, said: “The four key areas of action will include a focus on optimising separate waste collection, establishing a scrap quality standard, the collection and sorting of steel closures, and designing for recyclability.
“As APEAL’s recycling report published in 2018 illustrates, separate collection is the best way of guaranteeing high-quality input into recycling operations. It was therefore encouraging to see this highlighted in the Circular Economy Action Plan (CEAP) 2.0 report adopted by the European Parliament last 9th February.

“Establishing a scrap quality standard is equally important. Crucially, to maintain quality in the steel for packaging scrap value chain, quality control must start when the material is at the sorting facility. This can only be achieved by establishing a quality standard for packaging steel scrap.”

Whilst an average of 82,5% of all steel packaging is currently recycled across Europe, the collection and sorting of steel closures in Europe is estimated to be below-average, with steel closures regularly put in the wrong waste bin (and often in the residual waste bin) by citizens.

Mr Van Maercke continued: “Improving the recycling rate of steel closures will make a significant contribution in the drive towards zero steel packaging to landfill. But there is currently a lack of clear sorting instructions and low awareness among citizens. At the same time ineffective sorting techniques in a number of facilities result in collected steel closures being lost and not recycled.”

APEAL also believes designing for recyclability will underpin the successful implementation of all these measures, helping to ensure that every product placed on the market, can be recycled as efficiently as possible.

“Ultimately, steel packaging is a valuable resource which cannot be wasted if we are to achieve the objectives of the European Green Deal. APEAL will continue to work with its colleagues, the European Commission, European Parliament, Member States and all stakeholders to realise a shared ambition of a truly circular economy.”

A new APEAL report, ‘Why Steel recycles forever – How to collect, sort & recycle steel for packaging’, designed to help stakeholders throughout the value chain work collaboratively to achieve the 2025 Vision, is set to be published in December 2021.

At the same time, APEAL will reveal a new recycling rate objective in line with the new EU calculation methodology. Applicable for data from 2020, this new methodology moves the calculation point for all members states and all packaging materials, to the entrance of the recycling operation. This means that no impurities can be included and only materials that are really recycled can be included in the measurement process.

Mr Van Maercke added: “Indeed, APEAL will release the 2019 steel recycling rate in May this year. But towards the end of the year we aim to be the first material to release our figures with the new methodology.”